The Complete Persepolis

The Complete Persepolis

Here, in one volume: Marjane Satrapi's best-selling, internationally acclaimed graphic memoir.Persepolis is the story of Satrapi's unforgettable childhood and coming of age within a large and loving family in Tehran during the Islamic Revolution; of the contradictions between private life and public life in a country plagued by political upheaval; of her high school years...

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Title:The Complete Persepolis
Author:Marjane Satrapi
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Edition Language:English

The Complete Persepolis Reviews

  • Patrick

    I sat down to read a little of this during lunch, and ended up sitting in the restaurant for an hour after I was done eating. Eventually I felt guilty and left, but my plans were shot for the afternoon, as all I could think about was finishing this book.

    I wish there were some mechanism on Goodreads to occasionally give a book more than five stars. Something to indicate when you think a book is more than merely excellent. Like for every 100 books you review, you earn the right to give one six-st

    I sat down to read a little of this during lunch, and ended up sitting in the restaurant for an hour after I was done eating. Eventually I felt guilty and left, but my plans were shot for the afternoon, as all I could think about was finishing this book.

    I wish there were some mechanism on Goodreads to occasionally give a book more than five stars. Something to indicate when you think a book is more than merely excellent. Like for every 100 books you review, you earn the right to give one six-star review.

    If such a mechanism were in place, I'd use my six-star review on this graphic novel. It was lovely and clear. It had a strong emotional impact, without being sugary or uncomfortable. It was eye-opening without being preachy or didactic. I read the whole thing in less than three hours, and I can honestly say I am better for the experience.

  • Rowena

    This was brilliant: a graphic novel depicting the coming-of-age of a young Iranian girl living in Iran during the Islamic Revolution, who is eventually sent to live in Austria for 4 years for her safety. It shows the horrors of living in a war-torn nation, as well as how terrifying it must be to live in a country run by religious fundamentalists/fanatics. The Muslim leaders recruited 14 year old boys in the war effort, closed down schools, targeted intelligent people and women wearing jeans and

    This was brilliant: a graphic novel depicting the coming-of-age of a young Iranian girl living in Iran during the Islamic Revolution, who is eventually sent to live in Austria for 4 years for her safety. It shows the horrors of living in a war-torn nation, as well as how terrifying it must be to live in a country run by religious fundamentalists/fanatics. The Muslim leaders recruited 14 year old boys in the war effort, closed down schools, targeted intelligent people and women wearing jeans and nail polish...

    As a woman, the sexist views of the Islamists made me angry. One panel shows an Islamist on television saying "Women's hair emanates rays that excite men. That's why women should cover their hair." If that isn't the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard :/

    This was a very raw and candid portrayal of life. Satrapi didn't really try to sugarcoat anything. I liked the precocious child, Marji, who was trying to understand the world that was going on around her and wasn't scared of questioning the hypocrisies she witnessed. And her self-realization as she tried to determine her identity in Austria and when she went back to Iran and was perceived as an outsider and a worldly woman also held my attention.

    It made me think of people,especially children, living in other war-torn places such as Syria, what must they be going through everyday? What must they be witnessing? Torture, death etc? How can someone get over that?

    Definitely a must-read for everyone.

    Disclaimer: This book isn't anti-Islam, it's anti-fundamentalist. Satrapi mentioned how fundamentalists in every religion are dangerous, and I wholeheartedly agree.

  • Manny

    Visiting Spain for a conference earlier this month, I impulsively decided to do something about my almost non-existent Spanish. I began by reading the Spanish edition of

    , which got me started nicely. Now I wanted to try something harder. I had in fact read

    in French not long after it came out, but I remembered very little of it; this would be a proper test of whether I had actually learned anything. I was pleased to find that I could read it! I'm still having to guess

    Visiting Spain for a conference earlier this month, I impulsively decided to do something about my almost non-existent Spanish. I began by reading the Spanish edition of

    , which got me started nicely. Now I wanted to try something harder. I had in fact read

    in French not long after it came out, but I remembered very little of it; this would be a proper test of whether I had actually learned anything. I was pleased to find that I could read it! I'm still having to guess a lot of words, and every now and then I found a sentence that made no sense at all, but I could follow the story without difficulties.

    The thing which surprised me most was that I found I liked the book better in Spanish than I had in French. After a while, I figured out why: my very uncertain language skills forced me to look carefully at all the pictures, and I realized that I hadn't properly appreciated them first time round. I'd read the book pretty much in one sitting, which didn't do it justice. This time, I gave the graphical aspects the attention they deserved.

    But dammit, forget the Spanish and the artwork: it's still the story that wins. Her horror and indignation over the dreadful Iranian republic are so powerfully expressed. There's one episode in particular that I can't get out of my head. She's been characteristically loudmouthed at school. The teachers call her parents, and they tell her very seriously that she must be more careful. Does she know what had happened to the teenage daughter of the man they knew who made false passports?

    Marji looks at them.

    Well, say her parents, they arrested her. And they sentenced her to death. But, according to Iranian law, one may not put a virgin to death. So she was forcibly married to one of the revolutionary guards, and he deflowered her. And then they could shoot her. But, again according to Iranian law, the groom must give the bride a dowry, and if she is dead he must give it to her parents. So the next day, a representative of the revolutionary guard called on them. And he gave them fifty tumanes - about five dollars. That was the price for her virginity and her life.

    I'm sorry, says Marji, stunned. I didn't know.

    The truly terrifying thing is that the tone, throughout most of the book, is one of amused irony. As she says in another very powerful passage, when she meets a friend who's been horribly mutilated after serving in the war with Iraq, you can only complain up to a certain point, when the pain is still bearable. After that it makes no sense any more. All you can do is laugh.

  • Alejandro

    Creator, Writer & Illustrator: Marjane Satrapi

    Creator, Writer & Illustrator: Marjane Satrapi

    is the masterpiece by Marjane Satrapi, a pseudo-biographical work, illustrating her life since 10 years old (1980) until 24 years old (1994), where she experienced her coming-to-life, in her native Iran, during the Islamic Revolution and the war with Iraq, along with four years in Europe, and her return to Iran again.

    In this graphic novel you will witness many of the convoluted events happening during the decade of the 80s in the Middle East, from the point of view of a brave girl that was living at the heart of the incidents.

    Marjane is able to present each topic that she wants to expose in titled parts where you learn about relevant facts of Iranian’s society, its past, its present and its future.

    However, what makes unique

    is the brilliant approach by Marjane Satrapi of those events, since while she is fearless to show the brutal side, she is also honest in showing her failures and doubts during growing up, and even she goes to the funny side of life.

    Since it’s impossible for any human being to live in constant stressed status, people need to breath, to liberate the weight of their risky existence in many different ways.

    People needs to smile, not matter where they live. They need to live.

    And Marjane knows that.

    Therefore, she masterfully is able to tell her lifestory, full of political episodes and social chapters, but always adding humoristic elements with taste and without ridiculing the seriousness and gravity of the situations.

    Anybody can tell a tragedy but…

    …a dramedy requires talent, tact and wit.

    Brace yourself and meet

    .

  • Marpapad

    Persepolis is a truly amazing graphic novel....

  • Mia Nauca

    Hace poco leí el cuento de la criada y me pareció un libro de distopía inconcebible en la actualidad. Sin embargo, leer Persépolis me ha abierto muchísimo la mente, para una mujer occidental es fácil olvidar la realidad que se vive en los países como Irán e Iraq que están sometidos a regímenes religiosos extremistas donde las mujeres no tienen ningún derecho. Ni siquiera pueden correr en público, maquillarse, enseñar los tobillos o las muñecas... es que es tan surreal para mi pensar que eso pasa

    Hace poco leí el cuento de la criada y me pareció un libro de distopía inconcebible en la actualidad. Sin embargo, leer Persépolis me ha abierto muchísimo la mente, para una mujer occidental es fácil olvidar la realidad que se vive en los países como Irán e Iraq que están sometidos a regímenes religiosos extremistas donde las mujeres no tienen ningún derecho. Ni siquiera pueden correr en público, maquillarse, enseñar los tobillos o las muñecas... es que es tan surreal para mi pensar que eso pasa en el 2017.

    Pero hay muchas personas que se rebelan contra el sistema, mucha gente que no esta de acuerdo y que hace una diferencia. Que importante es leer este libro amigos que en forma de novela gráfica se pasa volando.

  • Mohammed Arabey

    مورجان سترابي من عائلة متحررة الي حد كبير، ليس الأمر شاذا هنا… ففي إيران الستينات والسبعينات رغم القمع العسكري من شاه إيران إلا ان التشدد لم يبلغ ماحدث بعد الثورة ال-استغفر الله العظيم-الاسلامية

    فتاة بأحلام الطفولة البريئة ظنت انها عندما تكبر يمكنها ان تكون "رسولة" تنشر رسالة الخير والمساواة والعدالة الإجتماعية لمن حولها، مبنية علي ثقافات بلدها وفلسفة رازدشت

    كونها من عائلة مثقفة وواعية وميسورة الحال جعلها تعرف الكثير عن تاريخ إيران وحروبها مع العرب والمغول، انقلاب الخمسينات وطغيان الشاه...ظنت عندما وجدت ثورة 79 إنه قد يتحقق فعلا المساواة والعدالة الإجتماعية لتكتشف مدي خداع احلامها الطفولية

    من خلال حوالي 20 فصلا ستري قصص أسرية، ثورية، أجزاء كبيرة من شكل الحياة الايرانية قبل وبعد الثورة.. إقحام الدين في الاستبداد والحروب وقتل القاصرين في الصفوف الأمامية في الحروب...لمحات من تاريخ إيران ونقاط التحول السياسية بها

    وكيف تم تشويه الدين عن طريق السياسة والأطماع

    ستري أيضا الانبهار المعتاد بالثقافة الغربية والأغاني الأجنبية، مايكل جاكسون وفرقة آبا بطريقة أعتقد شبيهة جدا لفترة السبعينات في مصر..فمن من اهلنا لا يعرف خوليو اجلاسياس أو ديميس روسوس او حتي فيلم جون ترافولتا الراقص وبروس لي ملك الترسو الاجنبي؟

    ولكنك ستجد كيف صار الحصول علي أشياء كهذه في ايران جريمة عقابها الجلد

    عند نشر الكتاب لاول مرة تم نشره علي 4 اجزاء، قصة عودة مكونة من جزئين ايضا ولنر

    النصف الأول مورجان وتحولها من فتاة في الرابعة عشر الي السادسة عشر...عامان في الخارج تحاول تحقيق نفسها،استكمال تعليمها في بلد يتيح لها التنفس

    ورغم طبيعتها المتمردة إلا انها ستحاول رغم صعوبات أخري قد تكون مختلفة شكلا ولكنها تكاد تكون متشابهة مضمونا

    اما النصف الثاني فهو أواخر شهور مورجان في الخارج إنتهاءا بفصل مسمي بعبقرية "الخمار"، متبوعا بفصول عودتها الي إيران في سن الشباب لتشهد التغيرات -للاصعب- ببلدها

    لتكمل دراستها الأكاديمية بالفن...والبحث عن الذات والهوية...في ظل هرمونات الارتباط في مجتمع متشدد لا يخلو من الحياة الماجنة السرية

    محمد العربي

    من 20 يوليو 2016

    الي 22 يوليو 2016

  • Alienor ✘ French Frowner ✘

    :

    was originally written in French. Way to feel dumb as shit in the (French) bookstore, I assure you.

    :

    , as a French-Iranian, can't enter the US now. But hey, it's for your

    , all that shit.***

    *** I just learned that French-Iranian had been authorized to go to the US with a Visa.

    :

    :

    was originally written in French. Way to feel dumb as shit in the (French) bookstore, I assure you.

    :

    , as a French-Iranian, can't enter the US now. But hey, it's for your

    , all that shit.***

    *** I just learned that French-Iranian had been authorized to go to the US with a Visa.

    :

    (approximate translation by me, I don't own the English version to check)

    ... because

    For me, the strength of

    's graphic-novel relies on the

    it offers the reader : where more classic nonfiction books can easily end up as mere juxtapositions of historical events (which is often boring, okay?),

    successfully breaks the codes by combining Iran's History with

    's experience. I, for one, believe that we need this kind of insight just as much as history books, because as I said in my review of

    , it's way too easy to dehumanize people we know nothing about, to forget the much real people living in the countries that our leaders target.

    This is what I mean when I say that there's nothing

    anymore in strongly disagreeing with Trump's decisions, especially when it comes to Muslims. At this point, it's not about agreeing on reducing taxes for the rich in order to avoid flight of capital, it's about acknowledging that everything in Western culture participates in feeding our prejudices. Really it's about

    and that it's an everyday, conscious work to fight against them.

    : It doesn't mean agreeing with everything. It doesn't mean, oh my god, erasing western culture** - and that concept, loved and spread by so many of far right voters is so fucking ridiculous given the fact that we have controlled the narrative for so long, it's not even funny. The "great replacement" so dearly loved by FN voters is merely another way for them to express their islamophobia and show their lack of basic education. Forget me with this shit.

    ** I'm using "western culture" as a generalization here - I don't believe that all western countries share the *same* culture, far from it.

    : it means accepting that different experiences are just as much

    It means educating yourself, reading about and from people from different cultures. It means rejecting any attempt of categorizing cultures as being good or evil as a whole. It means a lot of listening and maybe less talking.

    Trust me, I very much include myself when I say that we have to educate ourselves. The truth is, I have a shit tons of biases. I'm desperately secular, hopelessly Cartesian and very much on the Left spectrum. I've beneficed from my white privilege my whole life. I'm a straight, abled woman from Europe. I will never understand religion - I am interested

    religions, but it's not the same thing and it never will. As far as I'm concerned, though, people can believe what they want as long as they don't try to convince me that I should believe and live my life according to thus beliefs. And just to be clear, right now the intolerant people who are being vocals about condemning abortion or LGBTQIA rights in my country are very much Christians.

    Am I going to screw up and fail to notice hurtful contents in the books I read? Probably, unfortunately. Yet I think that in the end,

    Everything starts with education, and I'm not saying this because I'm a teacher.

  • Casey

    Ugh. I am deeply ambivalent. First, I found the political side fascinating. If you're interested in Iran's history, the graphic novel format is really accessible. However, I really disliked Marjane. I feel a little guilty about this, as she's a real person. While she and her family were proud that she was outspoken, I found her rude and obnoxious. They believed she was raised to be "free." I certainly appreciate their hugely liberal views in such a repressive environment, but their version of "f

    Ugh. I am deeply ambivalent. First, I found the political side fascinating. If you're interested in Iran's history, the graphic novel format is really accessible. However, I really disliked Marjane. I feel a little guilty about this, as she's a real person. While she and her family were proud that she was outspoken, I found her rude and obnoxious. They believed she was raised to be "free." I certainly appreciate their hugely liberal views in such a repressive environment, but their version of "free" felt more like "offensive" and "disrespectful" and "tactless." There are so many instances in this book where Marjane faces conflict, and instead of sticking up for herself in a decent manner, she resorts to calling people prostitutes or bitches or whatever. I never thought I'd be one to criticize profanity or being up-front, but I found that they made Marjane very unsavory.

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