A Series of Unfortunate Events Box: The Complete Wreck

A Series of Unfortunate Events Box: The Complete Wreck

NOW A NETFLIX ORIGINAL SERIESSome boxes should never be opened.For the first time, the complete A Series of Unfortunate Events is available in one awful package!We can't keep you from succumbing to this international bestselling phenomenon, but we can hide all thirteen books in a huge, elaborately illustrated, shrink-wrapped box, perfect for filling an empty shelf or deep...

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Title:A Series of Unfortunate Events Box: The Complete Wreck
Author:Lemony Snicket
Rating:
Edition Language:English

A Series of Unfortunate Events Box: The Complete Wreck Reviews

  • lil em

    I love that you love these books! It's clever that the one word sayings from sunny are actually ironic one word summaries of the exact situation or sometimes a word in a different language to describe her meaning. I enjoy that hes teaching children vocabulary and pharses in easy to understand and witty ways. I love Lemony Snickets dark sense of humor, I think that he is opening doors for children to be introduced to great literature and poets by referencing them in his books. (ie Robert Frost, T

    I love that you love these books! It's clever that the one word sayings from sunny are actually ironic one word summaries of the exact situation or sometimes a word in a different language to describe her meaning. I enjoy that hes teaching children vocabulary and pharses in easy to understand and witty ways. I love Lemony Snickets dark sense of humor, I think that he is opening doors for children to be introduced to great literature and poets by referencing them in his books. (ie Robert Frost, Tolstoy, Baudelaire, etc). If you like these books you should listen to NPR interviews with Lemony Snicket they are hilarious...also the band the Gothic Archies (Magnetic Fields) are awesome!

  • Maralena

    I hate literature. Unabashedly and with passion. This, my friends, is not literature. You could not waste your time sitting around in a stuffy room with the windows drawn on a beautiful day analyzing this text. This is pure storytelling plain and simple and leaves no room for the ego. This is what books are about, my friends: losing awareness of the self such that when you turn the last page and come out the other end, you have no original thoughts whatsoever, only the desire to keep reading.

  • Yasi

    I really like Lemony Snicket's style of writing, asking us to stop reading throughout the book, giving definitions of the words. the books are totally funny. I have learned many new words and phrases by reading the series. I recommend the whole set!

  • Bethany

    What I have enjoyed throughout this series is the way the author makes the reader think. By think I mean, research, investigate and remember important events, words, etc. You are encouraged to keep a journal to write down your thoughts and insights. It is dark humour and probably appropriate for about age 8 and up depending on the sensitivity of the child. It does deal with some sad things like the fact that our protagonists become orphans and the adults are either trying to off them or are too

    What I have enjoyed throughout this series is the way the author makes the reader think. By think I mean, research, investigate and remember important events, words, etc. You are encouraged to keep a journal to write down your thoughts and insights. It is dark humour and probably appropriate for about age 8 and up depending on the sensitivity of the child. It does deal with some sad things like the fact that our protagonists become orphans and the adults are either trying to off them or are too incompetent or oblivious to help them. That aside, there are enough wonderfully witty and sensitive moments to keep the books brilliant all the while teaching large and obscure vocabulary. The books get a bit formulaic through the middle of the series; but stick with it and you'll be out of the mundane mire soon. The last four books were particularly good I thought. If you have been "keeping your notes up" (I did it easily in my head), The End should close things up rather nicely, if you didn't or only followed haphazardly, you may be disappointed. I would encourage parents to read along with their children as there are so many opportunities to discuss important "growing up issues" such as the fact that nobody is all bad or all good, that we don't know and can't know everything about another's life, and that you cannot escape all the bad things that happen in the world so we need to learn to deal with them. I thought the end of THE END was a rather sweet (but not sickeningly) adieu to a great series.

  • Adam

    Some things are best communicated in person. Among these things are sign language, marriage proposals, and infectious diseases. However, in many cases personal communication is simply not feasible. While I would like to declare to each of you personally the release of the 13th and final book in Lemony Snicket's "A Series of Unfortunate Events," I must resort to an impersonal means of making this most important announcement, so I am posting it here.

    For the sake of those who are unfamiliar with th

    Some things are best communicated in person. Among these things are sign language, marriage proposals, and infectious diseases. However, in many cases personal communication is simply not feasible. While I would like to declare to each of you personally the release of the 13th and final book in Lemony Snicket's "A Series of Unfortunate Events," I must resort to an impersonal means of making this most important announcement, so I am posting it here.

    For the sake of those who are unfamiliar with the series (and no, seeing the movie does not count as being familiar with the series), I will give you a small taste of what you are missing. The following is the opening paragraph from the tenth book:

    A man of my acquaintance once wrote a poem called "The Road Less Traveled," describing a journey he took through the woods along a path most travelers never used. The poet found that the road less traveled was peaceful but quite lonely, and he was probably a bit nervous as he went along, because if anything happened on the road less traveled, the other travelers would be

    more frequently traveled and so couldn't hear him as he cried for help. Sure enough, that poet is now dead."

    As is evidenced by the above excerpt, this book series is not for the faint of heart. If you want to read a book with a formulaic fairy-tale ending, or one that transports you to a land replete with butterflies and lollipops, then look elsewhere. So why am I so excited to read a book that is sure to be fraught with tragedy, woe, and death? Because it's funny as hades. If you want to read a book that takes life with all its maladies and presents it with such cleverness and wit that you can't help but laugh, then look no further. You'll be glad you took the road less traveled.

  • Candise

    Basically, this book is about how kids are hella smart, and adults just don't give them enough cred. The Baudelaire children have just become the Baudelaire orphans, and everything bad that could ever befall them happen in this series. Each child has a skill: Violet is a brilliant inventor, Klaus is a bookwork with an incredible memory, and Sunny has razor-sharp teeth. Together, they are the ultimate machine.

    There is mystery, multiple attempts at murder, serious pun-action, and a gothic overshad

    Basically, this book is about how kids are hella smart, and adults just don't give them enough cred. The Baudelaire children have just become the Baudelaire orphans, and everything bad that could ever befall them happen in this series. Each child has a skill: Violet is a brilliant inventor, Klaus is a bookwork with an incredible memory, and Sunny has razor-sharp teeth. Together, they are the ultimate machine.

    There is mystery, multiple attempts at murder, serious pun-action, and a gothic overshadow that makes the time-setting uncertain. Ultimately, this series is about three siblings who seriously care and look out for one another. They know their strength lies in being together.

    What I found amazing about this series is how everything seems to be in black and white at the beginning: you know who the good and bad guys are. But as the series progresses, the water muddies, and there is a lot more ambiguity. As the Baudelaire's (and our) knowledge grows, we are faced with difficult situations and thus cannot view the world in such extremes. Just like in life, there is no black and white. We can only do what we must in order to survive, and sometimes our actions and feelings are complicated.

    SOUE are children's books, but contain adult humor and themes. Originally, I thought that they were children's books written for adults. But I guess that's the point. We don't give kids enough credit.

  • Debbie

    #1: The Bad Beginning; #2: The Reptile Room; #3: The Wide Window; #4: The Miserable Mill; #5: The Austere Academy; #6: The Erstz Elevator; #7: The Vile Village; #8: The Hostile Hospital; #9: The Carnivorous Carnival; #10: The Slippery Slope; #11: The Grim Grotto; #12: The Penultimate Peril; #13: The End

    After the three Baudelaire children (Violet, Klaus, and Sunny) lose their parents in a house fire, they experience so much misfortune and so many narrow escapes from the evil Count Olaf that it ba

    #1: The Bad Beginning; #2: The Reptile Room; #3: The Wide Window; #4: The Miserable Mill; #5: The Austere Academy; #6: The Erstz Elevator; #7: The Vile Village; #8: The Hostile Hospital; #9: The Carnivorous Carnival; #10: The Slippery Slope; #11: The Grim Grotto; #12: The Penultimate Peril; #13: The End

    After the three Baudelaire children (Violet, Klaus, and Sunny) lose their parents in a house fire, they experience so much misfortune and so many narrow escapes from the evil Count Olaf that it barely fits into 13 books. They are smart and inventive, but they still can't avoid the trouble that finds them wherever they go. The End, the final book in the series, is a somewhat disappointing end to such an entertaining series. I feel a bit cheated that there aren't many answers at the end of The End.

  • Bakeshow

    I accidentally found this series one day at the library. The cover art intrigued me so I checked out the book I saw, not realizing it was the 5th in a series. I thought the book was hilarious so I quickly checked out all the books that were written up to that point.

    They are mock gothic novels following some very unfortunate children through thier lives of orphanhood. Yes, they live very, very depressing lives and only once in a while does some sun shine on thier otherwise woefully dark lives.

    I

    I accidentally found this series one day at the library. The cover art intrigued me so I checked out the book I saw, not realizing it was the 5th in a series. I thought the book was hilarious so I quickly checked out all the books that were written up to that point.

    They are mock gothic novels following some very unfortunate children through thier lives of orphanhood. Yes, they live very, very depressing lives and only once in a while does some sun shine on thier otherwise woefully dark lives.

    I was eager for the rest of the books to come out, reading them the day they were released then waiting impatiently for the next to come out a year or so later.

    Sadly though, I have to admit I was really disappointed with how they ended. But, if Mr. Snicket knew I thought that, he would figure his goal complete. They are not meant to end well. They are Unfortunate stories... not mostly unfortunate, but only until they end and just because it's what society wants (a happy ending) that is what society gets.

    Don't get me wrong, they don't end sad... they kind of just dont... end. All the sudden they're just over. Now that I've ruined it for you, go and read them and see for yourselves.

  • Will Byrnes

    series was great fun for the first few. They are entertaining, fast reads, filled with a dark, sardonic wit and a fairy tale sensibility. I found, though, that after a few they became redundant. It was the same bad guy using disguises and perverting systems designed to protect the children, to seek his own ends. It was the same clever children foiling the evil count's sinister design

    series was great fun for the first few. They are entertaining, fast reads, filled with a dark, sardonic wit and a fairy tale sensibility. I found, though, that after a few they became redundant. It was the same bad guy using disguises and perverting systems designed to protect the children, to seek his own ends. It was the same clever children foiling the evil count's sinister designs. You

    have too much of a good thing. I ultimately passed on the last volume or two. The 2004 film was visually impressive and entertaining overall. The Netflix series, with Neil Patrick Harris as you-know-who, began in 2017. Season two begins Friday, March 30, 2018. Season three has been set, with broadcast date remaining to be determined.

    - image from Elite Daily

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