Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Willy Wonka's famous chocolate factory is opening at last!But only five lucky children will be allowed inside. And the winners are: Augustus Gloop, an enormously fat boy whose hobby is eating; Veruca Salt, a spoiled-rotten brat whose parents are wrapped around her little finger; Violet Beauregarde, a dim-witted gum-chewer with the fastest jaws around; Mike Teavee, a toy pi...

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Title:Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
Author:Roald Dahl
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Reviews

  • Jason Koivu

    I was ten years old and already the magic was gone from the Tooth Fairy, the Easter Bunny, leprechauns, Santa Claus and his buddy the Krampus. All was stripped of its power to enthrall. Heck, even sex had been demystified years prior.

    Then along came

    . It gloried in candy, my number one passion of the day. But not only that, eating candy was the means to getting even MORE candy!

    Ah, the golden ticket. How, oh, how I longed for it to be a real thing! I would've tr

    I was ten years old and already the magic was gone from the Tooth Fairy, the Easter Bunny, leprechauns, Santa Claus and his buddy the Krampus. All was stripped of its power to enthrall. Heck, even sex had been demystified years prior.

    Then along came

    . It gloried in candy, my number one passion of the day. But not only that, eating candy was the means to getting even MORE candy!

    Ah, the golden ticket. How, oh, how I longed for it to be a real thing! I would've traded in a half dozen Christmasses for that.

    For those few who haven't read the book or seen one of the movies, finding a golden ticket in a candy bar meant you got to visit Willy Wonka's mysterious chocolate factory, which had been closed to the public and rumored to be run by a madman.

    Once poor-and-ever-so-grateful Charlie makes it inside the factory everything comes alive! The amazing sights, sounds, smells and tastes! The sky's the limit (quite literally we discover in the second book). Wonka's childlike imagination seems to know no bounds!

    But then things turn a bit queer. One by one, the children invited into the factory start dropping off and in the most interesting of ways. This is a fight to the finish and it becomes clear that there can be only one!

    I don't know what was better, the candy or the killing off of brats. Ah but to be serious,

    brought back the wonder and excitement of my earliest memories. Thank you Roald Dahl for giving me back magic, the sweetest gift of all.

  • Grace Tjan

    Jess, my 7 year old little girl, gives it 5 stars.

    Comments while reading:

    “How come someone is called ‘Gloop’? And ‘Salt’? Isn’t that the thing that we use for cooking?”

    “What is ‘spoiled’? Oh, okay, I’m NOT spoiled.”

    “Huh, Grandpa Joe is 96 years old?! How come that he’s even older than my grandpa?”

    “How come Charlie’s dad can’t work at the toothpaste factory anymore? What does ‘bankrupt’ mean?”

    “Will Charlie ever get the golden ticket?”

    “Yes! Charlie found it!”

    “Mr. Wonka looks like a clown!”

    “How com

    Jess, my 7 year old little girl, gives it 5 stars.

    Comments while reading:

    “How come someone is called ‘Gloop’? And ‘Salt’? Isn’t that the thing that we use for cooking?”

    “What is ‘spoiled’? Oh, okay, I’m NOT spoiled.”

    “Huh, Grandpa Joe is 96 years old?! How come that he’s even older than my grandpa?”

    “How come Charlie’s dad can’t work at the toothpaste factory anymore? What does ‘bankrupt’ mean?”

    “Will Charlie ever get the golden ticket?”

    “Yes! Charlie found it!”

    “Mr. Wonka looks like a clown!”

    “How come Oompa-Loompas only eat mashed up caterpillars? EEW!”

    “Augustus Gloop got sucked up into the pipe because he was GREEDY.”

    “Will Violet ever be all right again or will she always be a blueberry?”

    “I want these:

    EATABLE MARSHMALLOW PILLOWS

    So I can sleep on it and eat it little by little.

    LICKABLE WALLPAPER

    It would be great if I can have it in my room, so every time I want an orange or banana, I can just lick it.

    LUMINOUS LOLLIES FOR EATING IN BED AT NIGHT

    So that I don’t have to use my night light anymore. But what happens when it’s finished?

    INVISIBLE CHOCOLATE BARS FOR EATING IN CLASS

    So that I can eat it in class! But I don’t think Miss Ayu will like it if I do that.”

    “These are just silly! Mr. Wonka likes to invent strange things!

    HOT ICE CUBES THAT MAKES HOT DRINKS HOTTER

    Who wants to have their hot drinks even hotter?

    FIZZY LEMONADE SWIMMING POOL

    Won’t your body be tingling and itchy all over if you swim in there? It’s fizzy like Coca Cola, right?”

    “But the funniest thing is that SQUARE CANDY THAT LOOKS ROUND! I’m going to tell dad about it and then all my friends at school!”

    “I like it when Mr. Wonka says to Mrs. Salt, “My dear old fish, go boil your head!” Mr. Wonka used to be more polite and now he is getting rude.”

    “Mike Teavee got very small because he is sent through the TV. No, I don’t watch too much TV like him.”

    “This song about watching too much TV is too LONG. Just skip it.”

    “I don’t think anything bad will happen to Charlie, because he’s good. Also, it is written in the front of the book that he is THE HERO.”

    “What? Charlie got the whole factory? That’s because he’s GOOD.”

    “I want a chocolate candy and I want more books by Roald Dahl!”

  • Patrick

    Tonight I just finished reading Charlie and the Chocolate factory with my son. This is the first chapter book I've read all the way through with him. And it was a ton of fun.

    First off, I'll admit that I love the movie. I grew up with it. (I'm talking about the Gene Wilder version, of course.)I'll even admit to liking the movie better than the book. Which is something that doesn't happen very often with me.

    That said, the book is really, really good. It held my four-year old's attention. It's si

    Tonight I just finished reading Charlie and the Chocolate factory with my son. This is the first chapter book I've read all the way through with him. And it was a ton of fun.

    First off, I'll admit that I love the movie. I grew up with it. (I'm talking about the Gene Wilder version, of course.)I'll even admit to liking the movie better than the book. Which is something that doesn't happen very often with me.

    That said, the book is really, really good. It held my four-year old's attention. It's silly, and it's fun.

    And it's DARK.

    For those of you who haven't read the book, let me underline this fact for you. Dahl takes pains to really detail the fact that Charlie and his family aren't just hungry and poor. They're destitute. Charlie sleeps on a mattress on the floor. In the winter they are cold, and they're starving to death.

    And if you think I'm exaggerating on that last point, I'm not. One of the chapters is titled: The Family Begins to Starve.

    But you know what? I like this book better because of that. It's not sanitized pablum written by committee to be inoffensive. It's the story of a little boy who is in a fucking awful situation, but he is still good and kind and polite and then something really nice happens to him.

    That's a trope I can get behind.

    Its it a good book to read with your kids? Absolutely.

    That said, allow me to tangent off and share my thoughts as a total bastard:

    If Willie Wonka actually hired workers and paid them a living wage, maybe Charlie Bucket wouldn't be starving to death in the first place.

    Follow me here. Wonka is effectively running a company where everyone is paid in scrip. The Oompa Loompas are paid, quite literally, in beans. Beans that I'm guessing he has the Oompa Loompas themselves growing in some huge underground cavern.

    Let's not even get into the ethical tarpit of the fact that Wonka uproots an entire indigenous culture and enslaves them. Let's just look at this from a raw numbers point of view. Pure economics.

    The Oompa Loompas work in the factory. They are not paid. They never leave the factory. That means they don't pay rent. They don't buy groceries. They don't go to the movies, or take taxis ,or buy clothes.

    But *everyone* buys Wonka's chocolate.

    That means that money goes into the factory, but it doesn't come back out into the town.

    As a result, the local economy is crap. And it's because of this that Charlie's dad can't get a decent job. What's more, it's because of this that his dad *loses* his shitty job, and his family is starving to death.

    Willie Wonka isn't a childlike magic maker. He's a billionaire corporate fuckwit. He's the candy equivalent of Monsanto. There's no government oversight there. Osha would never have approved that bullshit boiled sweet boat and chocolate river. No. Dude is untouchable.

    And don't tell me he isn't. That shit that goes on with the other kids? Nobody even *thinks* of suing him. None of the parents even *hint* at it. He probably owns half the judges in the state, and a handful of senators, too.

    He's a fucking supervillian. And I would paid serious money to see a story where Batman kicks his ass.

    *End Rant*

    In closing, let me share something that Oot said while I was reading him this book:

    "Dad, Willie Wonka is just a regular human, but he *is* a little bit of a wizard like you."

  • Bookdragon Sean

    I was planning on writing an extremely argumentative review explaining how sadistically vile Willie Wonka is, and how his god-like complex ruined the lives of four flawed children. But that seems insensitive at the moment.

    Instead I shall simply say that Gene Wilder dominated his performance as Willie Wonka. He carried all the outward charm, the charisma and the playfulness, but still managed to portray the suggestions of darkness that permeate this character’s heart. Wonka is far from a good ma

    I was planning on writing an extremely argumentative review explaining how sadistically vile Willie Wonka is, and how his god-like complex ruined the lives of four flawed children. But that seems insensitive at the moment.

    Instead I shall simply say that Gene Wilder dominated his performance as Willie Wonka. He carried all the outward charm, the charisma and the playfulness, but still managed to portray the suggestions of darkness that permeate this character’s heart. Wonka is far from a good man, though this book remains excellent and an extended allegory for many things.

    Full review to come.

  • James

    One of the first books I ever read. I wanted to watch the movie, but wasn't allowed to until I read the book. And so I did. And now, every few years, I want to again. It's been a long time. But who doesn't love chocolate and dreams and wishes and gifts? I think I may read this series... only looked at the first one.

  • Justin

    I'm sitting here on the couch watching Violet turn violet and fill up with juice before being sent off to the de-juicing room. The sun is going down, and it's almost bedtime out here, at least for the kids. My night is just beginning. I've been halfway following along with the movie and thinking about how awesome it was to be a kid- to dream of chocolate factories and eating a lifetime supply of chocolate with no fear of diabetes or a heart attack.

    This was the first book I read all the way thro

    I'm sitting here on the couch watching Violet turn violet and fill up with juice before being sent off to the de-juicing room. The sun is going down, and it's almost bedtime out here, at least for the kids. My night is just beginning. I've been halfway following along with the movie and thinking about how awesome it was to be a kid- to dream of chocolate factories and eating a lifetime supply of chocolate with no fear of diabetes or a heart attack.

    This was the first book I read all the way through with the kids, and then we were immediately back at the library to pick up the sequel, which I never read as a kid. It has a really weird beginning. Not quite the same as this one. But I'm having the time of my life reading classic children's book out loud and feeling young again.

    My oldest son is 7 and he's on he fourth book in the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series. He's flying through them! He now takes a book to school, in the car on short rides, to bed at night, and anywhere else he can. Hashtag parenting win. I hope he sticks with it.

    Mike Teevee just got blasted into a million pieces and showed up on television. What a wild trip that was, he says. Almost time for Charlie to.... spoiler alert... we'll, you know what happens next. You should know. Everyone knows. Gene Wilder is awesome.

    I thought I read a lot of Roald Dahl as a kid, but there are a lot of books I missed apparently. I did star as the father of James in my high school's production of James and the Giant Peach. I had one line, I think. I just said "Oh no! A rhino!" I'm pretty sure that was it, and then I died. Trampled by a rhinoceros.

    You get nothing! You lose! Good day, sir!

  • Whitney Atkinson

    The movie always fascinated me--both as a kid and adult--so I was really eager to jump into this and see if I could figure it out. But dude, i'm still stumped. I'm not sure if Willy Wonka is supposed to be mad, a genius, or a mad genius. There's just so many priceless lines of dialogue that the movies also captured so well, and this book is so whimsical and wholesome, yet dark with sort of a fable-esque message about greed and whatnot from the Oompa-Loompa's songs/poems.

    I took a star off becaus

    The movie always fascinated me--both as a kid and adult--so I was really eager to jump into this and see if I could figure it out. But dude, i'm still stumped. I'm not sure if Willy Wonka is supposed to be mad, a genius, or a mad genius. There's just so many priceless lines of dialogue that the movies also captured so well, and this book is so whimsical and wholesome, yet dark with sort of a fable-esque message about greed and whatnot from the Oompa-Loompa's songs/poems.

    I took a star off because of shaky footing with the portrayal of certain features in this book, such as recurring fatphobia (also present in his other books), and the weird savior portrayal of Wonka in relation to his using Oompa-Loompas basically as slave labor in exchange for food and not much else. Maybe i'm reading too far into it, but it seems like a very unethical capitalistic scheme and instead of seeing Oompa-Loompas as people eager to make some chocolate, they seemed rather treated as inferior. (This is definitely not something 10-year old me picked up on as a child, but I can't unsee it, nonetheless)

  • Lyn

    Gene Wilder June 11, 1933 - August 29, 2016 - Goodbye Gene, you'll always be Willy Wonka to me.

    Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl first published in 1964 was an immediate children’s classic and has inspired two film versions.

    I was surprised to see that neither of the films came close to Dahl’s text. Dahl’s Willy Wonka is a dark creature who killed children, crushed their bones and baked them into the candy bars.

    Just kidding.

    This is of course a delightful children’s / young adult fan

    Gene Wilder June 11, 1933 - August 29, 2016 - Goodbye Gene, you'll always be Willy Wonka to me.

    Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl first published in 1964 was an immediate children’s classic and has inspired two film versions.

    I was surprised to see that neither of the films came close to Dahl’s text. Dahl’s Willy Wonka is a dark creature who killed children, crushed their bones and baked them into the candy bars.

    Just kidding.

    This is of course a delightful children’s / young adult fantasy featuring the inimitable Willy Wonka. The 1971 musical film directed by Mel Stuart and featuring Gene Wilder and Jack Albertson has long been a family favorite and I grew up loving the songs and Wilder’s performance. (Interestingly, according to IMDB – so you know its true – Peter Ostrum, the child actor who portrayed Charlie Bucket, only ever appeared in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, it was his only film credit. He is now a veterinarian).

    Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Tim Burton’s 2005 adaptation starring Johnny Depp and Christopher Lee was also very entertaining and I have enjoyed watching it as well.

    So it was no surprise that I finally got around to reading Dahl’s original novel. I was curious to see which film version came closest to Dahl’s vision, and I can surprisingly report that though they both come close to the original text, both rely heavily on artistic license and the kind of freedoms a director will often take when translating a literary work into film.

    Brilliant, quirky, and original this is a short work that a fan of the films, or of children’s fantasy literature should take the time to thoroughly enjoy.

  • Jan-Maat

    Slightly odd story of virtuous poverty rewarded by evil capitalist who caused the poverty by firing all his workers in favour of employing non-human immigrants.

    Unemployment from the chocolate factory, apparently the only consumer of labour in the otherwise stagnant economy of Charlie's home town, (proving I suppose that an excess of chocolate is really bad for you both economically and physically) requires that all of his grandparents have to live and sleep in one bed while the family slowly sta

    Slightly odd story of virtuous poverty rewarded by evil capitalist who caused the poverty by firing all his workers in favour of employing non-human immigrants.

    Unemployment from the chocolate factory, apparently the only consumer of labour in the otherwise stagnant economy of Charlie's home town, (proving I suppose that an excess of chocolate is really bad for you both economically and physically) requires that all of his grandparents have to live and sleep in one bed while the family slowly starves. Evidently the social contract is relentlessly one-sided in Charlie's country.

    Willy Wonka, the owner of the chocolate factory, a man who makes Charles Montgomery Burns look reasonable, holds a competition to allow a small number of children into his factory to select one of them to be his successor.

    Charlie wins one of the tickets. The hard school of his poverty having made him virtuous, he manages to survive all the other children whose gross moral turpitudes cause them to be eliminated.

    Having won the right to become Willy Wonka's successor he wins himself a sequel adventure but this involves travelling to the moon in an elevator rather than changing the employment practises of the factory and the introduction of a living wage. Proving, I suppose, there is a limit to the amount of fantasy you can fed a child before it becomes completely unbelievable.

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