Flavor, Vol. 1

Flavor, Vol. 1

Image Comics' most delicious Young Adult Culinary Fantasy is served up in a collected edition! Within a strange walled city, an unlicensed chef discovers a mystery that threatens to end it all. Join JOSEPH KEATINGE (GLORY, SHUTTER) and WOOK JIN CLARK (Adventure Time: The Flip Side) on this culinary epic adventure--FLAVOR--where chefs are the ultimate celebrity and food is...

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Title:Flavor, Vol. 1
Author:Joseph Keatinge
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Flavor, Vol. 1 Reviews

  • -RadioactiveBookworm-

    I know I say this a lot, but Flavor is unlike any of the other graphic novel's that I've read lately. Not only is the art style quirky and cute, but the story is as well, though it does harbour something dark just out of reach. From the first page, I couldn't wait to see what I was getting myself into.

    Check out my full review here!

  • Liz (Quirky Cat)

    Check out my review over at

  • Ruthsic

    This book was an enjoyable fantasy about a city with cutthroat culinary traditions, but a lot of the fun is dampened by the fact that hardly anything of it is explained. Xoo is a trained but not certified chef, and Anant is a novice chef who is also the son of the city's Lord - both live in this city where being a chef is a BIG DEAL. There's also a mystery regarding chefs who are disappearing and the authorities being involved in it. Their stories don't really intersect except for one common cha

    This book was an enjoyable fantasy about a city with cutthroat culinary traditions, but a lot of the fun is dampened by the fact that hardly anything of it is explained. Xoo is a trained but not certified chef, and Anant is a novice chef who is also the son of the city's Lord - both live in this city where being a chef is a BIG DEAL. There's also a mystery regarding chefs who are disappearing and the authorities being involved in it. Their stories don't really intersect except for one common character between them, and for the most part this volume is about the impending culinary competition about to the held in the city. One thing I didn't understand is why the non-certified chefs would even put in that much money to participate when they keep saying they are definitely not going to win. Seems Xoo is the only one who is fiscally smart? The artwork is good, and I love the character design. Overall, this first volume has been hiding more than it is revealing, essentially just keeping the reader confused and I don't wholly appreciate it.

  • Paul Decker

    *I received this book as an eARC from Image Comics via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review*

    The world in this book is so different than any I've seen before. It's a fantasy setting where the culinary arts are the center of everything. Chefs must be registered. There's a fancy academy for cooks-in-training. The worldbuilding is so cool.

    I'd say this book is Masterchef meets a fantasy dystopia. There's even a crepe recipe at the end! I give this book a 4/5. It's so unique. I'm excited to see

    *I received this book as an eARC from Image Comics via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review*

    The world in this book is so different than any I've seen before. It's a fantasy setting where the culinary arts are the center of everything. Chefs must be registered. There's a fancy academy for cooks-in-training. The worldbuilding is so cool.

    I'd say this book is Masterchef meets a fantasy dystopia. There's even a crepe recipe at the end! I give this book a 4/5. It's so unique. I'm excited to see where this series goes.

  • Arden Belrose

    A deliciously illustrated story of social strata, prejudices and taking risks. It is also about food, family and giving people a chance. Brownie points: It's a dystopian setting; what could be behind those walls?

    The illustration style is one of my favorites(and half the reason for picking this book), it's reminiscent of TinTin but with smoother edges and slightly more pastel colours. Font was Comic Sans MS(not unique but I'm not complaining as it's easy on the eye). I LOVED the little details th

    A deliciously illustrated story of social strata, prejudices and taking risks. It is also about food, family and giving people a chance. Brownie points: It's a dystopian setting; what could be behind those walls?

    The illustration style is one of my favorites(and half the reason for picking this book), it's reminiscent of TinTin but with smoother edges and slightly more pastel colours. Font was Comic Sans MS(not unique but I'm not complaining as it's easy on the eye). I LOVED the little details they put in to each panel, especially the larger ones with a town scene as there's lots of things to see. Buster, the dog, was just the cutest thing! Having him made it more bearable as I did not like the MC too much. Too stubborn for my liking.

    Flavor passes on the message that, to be a chef, certificates and prestige are not the key ingredients, rather, it's your absolute understanding of the food you're working with coupled with a zesty imagination and fiery resolve that puts you a cut above the rest!

  • Veronica

    Interesting worldbuilding. A vaguely fantastical city where cooking without a license is illegal hosts a massive cooking competition, and two young people -- a girl struggling to run her parents' restaurant after they both suffered an unspecified accident and a boy who attends an exclusive cooking school but fears he is only permitted to remain due to his parents' influence -- are caught up in the surrounding chaos. The two storylines don't intersect in the first volume, which leaves it feeling

    Interesting worldbuilding. A vaguely fantastical city where cooking without a license is illegal hosts a massive cooking competition, and two young people -- a girl struggling to run her parents' restaurant after they both suffered an unspecified accident and a boy who attends an exclusive cooking school but fears he is only permitted to remain due to his parents' influence -- are caught up in the surrounding chaos. The two storylines don't intersect in the first volume, which leaves it feeling very much like a lead-up to the actual action. The art is gorgeous, especially the colors. Appropriate for middle-grade readers and up.

  • Laura

    I liked it fine. Good colors, hints of interesting world building and something ominous. Didn't enthrall me, but entertaining enough.

  • Manon

    I wanted to love this but couldn't. I found it confusing and strange but not in a good way? I honestly wouldn't be able to summarize it right now. It felt kind of messy in every way and I was mostly lost.

    It had some good sides though but I didn't find the world was properly explained.

    The characters were pretty likable but they didn't make me feel.

    i found myself mostly untouched by this story... I jus

    I wanted to love this but couldn't. I found it confusing and strange but not in a good way? I honestly wouldn't be able to summarize it right now. It felt kind of messy in every way and I was mostly lost.

    It had some good sides though but I didn't find the world was properly explained.

    The characters were pretty likable but they didn't make me feel.

    i found myself mostly untouched by this story... I just went through the pages without feeling much. And that's a damn shame.

    I have to point out that I liked the art though and it was pretty original too.

  • Theediscerning

    A book I actually started re-reading, but only to see if I'd missed something I hadn't. But no. In a world of underground cooking contests, a boy who is in the academy to be a top chef becomes a girl who isn't, but is running an unlicensed creperie instead. Meanwhile there's a dog that borrows from Milou and Gromit both, so he can bark at our hero(ine) and be understood while at it, and read – and prep food, and I don't just mean cracking cheese. I can see why this is being compared with Ghibli,

    A book I actually started re-reading, but only to see if I'd missed something I hadn't. But no. In a world of underground cooking contests, a boy who is in the academy to be a top chef becomes a girl who isn't, but is running an unlicensed creperie instead. Meanwhile there's a dog that borrows from Milou and Gromit both, so he can bark at our hero(ine) and be understood while at it, and read – and prep food, and I don't just mean cracking cheese. I can see why this is being compared with Ghibli, as well, although that's actually not a great thing in my mind (I know, shoot me). What it actually is is just too muddled, with multiple time-lines, and too much that's held back to ever explain this place's mindset. The hermaphroditic lead is confusing, too.

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