Dare to Lead: Brave Work. Tough Conversations. Whole Hearts.

Dare to Lead: Brave Work. Tough Conversations. Whole Hearts.

In her #1 NYT bestsellers, Brené Brown taught us what it means to dare greatly, rise strong and brave the wilderness. Now, based on new research conducted with leaders, change makers and culture shifters, she’s showing us how to put those ideas into practice so we can step up and lead. Leadership is not about titles, status and power over people. Leaders are people who hol...

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Title:Dare to Lead: Brave Work. Tough Conversations. Whole Hearts.
Author:Brené Brown
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Dare to Lead: Brave Work. Tough Conversations. Whole Hearts. Reviews

  • Shanique Edwards

    This book combines Brene's (we're friends in my head) previous work and puts it in the context of being a strong, healthy leader. She takes her work on wholehearted living (Gifts of Imperfection), vulnerability & shame (Daring Greatly), the reckoning, rumble & revolution (Rising Strong), assuming the best intent (Braving the Wilderness) and much more and places those principles in an organizational environment. She gives practical advice about what it means to lead wholeheartedly, with v

    This book combines Brene's (we're friends in my head) previous work and puts it in the context of being a strong, healthy leader. She takes her work on wholehearted living (Gifts of Imperfection), vulnerability & shame (Daring Greatly), the reckoning, rumble & revolution (Rising Strong), assuming the best intent (Braving the Wilderness) and much more and places those principles in an organizational environment. She gives practical advice about what it means to lead wholeheartedly, with vulnerability (and what it doesn't), how to encourage and empower your team, and how to allow everyone to be their whole and best selves, using stories in her signature style. Of course Brene will wreck your whole life, in a good way, so be prepared to have thoughts and feel feelings and react viscerally as applicable.

  • Min

    So, I really appreciate Brené Brown. I love her books. I love her cussing (which she does in her talks more than her books) and, most of all, I love her staggering vulnerability and empathy.

    Dare To Lead continues her conquest of shame, dysfunction, ego, hate, indifference, and everything else that tries to dehumanize and destroy us every day but now, she focuses her work on vulnerability in the workplace.

    How do we become courageous, bold, creative, caring leaders at work? What does it mean for

    So, I really appreciate Brené Brown. I love her books. I love her cussing (which she does in her talks more than her books) and, most of all, I love her staggering vulnerability and empathy.

    Dare To Lead continues her conquest of shame, dysfunction, ego, hate, indifference, and everything else that tries to dehumanize and destroy us every day but now, she focuses her work on vulnerability in the workplace.

    How do we become courageous, bold, creative, caring leaders at work? What does it mean for us to begin a process of healing from past hurts, growing through our insecurities and shortcomings, and stepping into the arena, as Brown puts it, every single day?

    Dare to Lead addresses an epidemic need for greater trust, authenticity, empathy, and care within our organizations and places of work. Wherever we work, inevitably we will experience miscommunication, misalignment, mismanagement, conflict, unethical decisions, criticisms, pressures to excel, temptations to hide your weaknesses and failures, and so much more.

    Worse, we as a culture are becoming increasingly insensitive, outraged, and out of touch to our very own humanity. In the age of social media, algorithms, AI learning, and splintered narratives, we have forgotten that we are “people, people, people.” We are not just our tweets, we are not just our pain, we are not just our jobs or positions, but we are thoroughly and complexly human. Dare to Lead addresses these issues and helps pave a better path for all of us.

    I wholeheartedly recommend this book! It is relevant, powerful, smooth to read, and deeply real.

  • Stephanie

    Courage > Comfort.

  • Rose

    Brene Brown's "Dare To Lead" takes several discoveries and ideals from Brown's previous books and compiles them into a guide to be successful in business and leadership pursuits. A combination of personal stories, research from a wide variety of fields and concepts, Brown talks about having empathy, being able to rumble within difficult conversations, recognizing shame, being vulnerable, and using these concepts to become more daring leaders. "Courage over Comfort" is emphasized among a number o

    Brene Brown's "Dare To Lead" takes several discoveries and ideals from Brown's previous books and compiles them into a guide to be successful in business and leadership pursuits. A combination of personal stories, research from a wide variety of fields and concepts, Brown talks about having empathy, being able to rumble within difficult conversations, recognizing shame, being vulnerable, and using these concepts to become more daring leaders. "Courage over Comfort" is emphasized among a number of phrases. I thought this book was more focused and came together much better than "Braving the Wilderness" and I thought it was a very well done merging of Brown's eloquence in naming these specific issues while making the narrative personable, funny, engaging, and constructive. I definitely see myself coming back to listen to this audiobook in the future and I'm glad that I had the chance to read it.

    Overall score: 4.5/5 stars.

  • Lori

    I received this book from the goodreads giveaways. A very informative book on how to take down that armory. We are all vulnerable. it is hard to have confrontations with others or get our feelings out there. Brene' Brown gives good advice on how to get along with co-workers whether if you are a boss or an employee working with others. She offers tools of taking down that shield we can all have to communicate with others.

  • Mehwish Mughal

    The last self-help book I read was

    by Rhonda Byrne and that was approximately a decade ago. I made a simple decision. I won't do self-help books. Ever. Again. I would be telling lies if I say I have never been curious when people around me have talked about so and so self-help book and its 'greatness' or that I have never picked up self-help books while browsing in bookstores and libraries. The curiosity would be short-lived though. Just reading one page would reinforce my decision t

    The last self-help book I read was

    by Rhonda Byrne and that was approximately a decade ago. I made a simple decision. I won't do self-help books. Ever. Again. I would be telling lies if I say I have never been curious when people around me have talked about so and so self-help book and its 'greatness' or that I have never picked up self-help books while browsing in bookstores and libraries. The curiosity would be short-lived though. Just reading one page would reinforce my decision that I am not cut out for such books. I am just saying that watered-down version of great philosophical ideas or looking at science from a superficial level or telling me that my pain is bad or removing me from my political, geographical and social location is not for me. Though I still acknowledge and appreciate that these books help a lot of people. I guess that is some sort of consolation.

    Now that I have ranted about my stance on self-help books, I will move on to what I thought about this book:

    was an End of Year present from my manager and another friend had recommended it as well.

    The book is divided into 4 parts:

    1) The first part about vulnerability forced me to reflect on a lot of daily practices at work and I was deeply engaged in writing down ideas and making check-lists.

    2) The second part about values had hit it hard for me and therefore the 4 stars. There was an exercise that asked you to look at the values that form our core. The last 6 months have felt like being in the middle of the ocean with a tiny wooden boat with a hole at the bottom and not knowing how to swim. In that corporate chaos, I had completely forgotten what I stand for or if I stand at all. The exercise helped me ground myself again. Had it been any longer I would have lost some of my values.

    3) Part 3 & 4 went into being a self-help book. Easily forgettable paragraphs after paragraphs.

    Overall, the book is real and forces you to think about the way you deal with things. You cannot change how you are treated but you can change the way how you treat others. The chain of command with unhealthy practices can be stopped at you, filtered and then allowed to reach the people who look up to you. Ultimately, the onus of responsibility [for some things] lies with you and I am okay with that [for some things].

    I recommend it to leaders at any level.

  • Mehrsa

    It’s Brene Brown for your corporate retreat! I was turned off by the management speech, which I thought she said in the beginning she wouldn’t do (the temptation is great). I was also annoyed at the commodification of her vulnerability insights into cute little worlds. “We’re going to rumble with this.” My SFD is... etc. Its sort of what happens to good insights—once they go thru the corporate retreat circus, they come out as weird nouns that can also be verbs and lose their original meaning.

    Hav

    It’s Brene Brown for your corporate retreat! I was turned off by the management speech, which I thought she said in the beginning she wouldn’t do (the temptation is great). I was also annoyed at the commodification of her vulnerability insights into cute little worlds. “We’re going to rumble with this.” My SFD is... etc. Its sort of what happens to good insights—once they go thru the corporate retreat circus, they come out as weird nouns that can also be verbs and lose their original meaning.

    Having said that, it’s useful insights as always. Just maybe read the first few books as all her ideas can be applied to the workplace without becoming cute phrases and procedures and meetings.

  • Veronica

    With respect to Brené Brown, I could not even finish this book; as the genre goes, it's probably a wonderful work. But I

    this genre of books and don't know why I continue to seek them out with the naïve hope that I might find an exception to the rule. Attempting to read

    was a blunt reminder of the reason I never read self-help books.

  • Kelly

    I had a long drive to make this week and couldn't decide between buying this on audio or picking it up in print, and a friend suggested I listen to it on audio, then when it hits in paperback, buy that and mark it up. I think this was a great suggestion, and it was a nice reminder, too, how we pick up different things when we listed, as opposed to when we read in print.

    Brown is one of the best thinkers on leadership and confidence, and this book is no different. There are strategies here for bei

    I had a long drive to make this week and couldn't decide between buying this on audio or picking it up in print, and a friend suggested I listen to it on audio, then when it hits in paperback, buy that and mark it up. I think this was a great suggestion, and it was a nice reminder, too, how we pick up different things when we listed, as opposed to when we read in print.

    Brown is one of the best thinkers on leadership and confidence, and this book is no different. There are strategies here for being a better person, for developing empathy (which is a wonderfully deep section in the book -- a lengthy discussion of empathy vs. sympathy helps conceptually define the two ideas and showcases actions that define each). I'm a big believer that part of success comes from understanding people are people, and Brown's big mantra throughout the book is "people, people, people." Everyone has a story and everyone's minds make up stories to help them get through the day. When we remember this simple thing, it becomes easier to be a leader and to be an advocate for what it is you want, what you need, and where you fit into the grander scheme of your life. Because this book isn't about leadership in organizations only; sure that's there. But it's a book about being a leader in your life and showing up, day after day, for yourself.

    Maybe my favorite of hers so far. It incorporates a lot of what research she did in previous books but adds even more depth to them. I also enjoyed being reminded to reconsider what my core values are and I'm itching to get into her worksheets to suss those out. We all operate from a set (and yes, SET) of core values and when we can remember them, we can show up for ourselves again and again.

    Brown reads the audio and performs it less like a stiff reader and more like she's giving a TED talk or having a conversation with a group of people in an organization. There are good breaks and laughs, and I just really like hearing these ideas and seeing what sticks from the verbal explanation. I'm eager to revisit this in a year or so in print and read it with pen in hand.

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