The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

'This really is the "everything you have always wanted to know about feminism but were afraid to ask' manual. From a mind as lucid and witty as it is kind and empathetic comes essential reading for the planet.' EMMA THOMPSON In 2015 I described myself as 'guilty feminist' for the first time. My goals were noble but my concerns were trivial. I wanted desperately for women...

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Title:The Guilty Feminist
Author:Deborah Frances-White
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The Guilty Feminist Reviews

  • Eva

    You'd be hard-pressed to find a book that talks about feminism in a more accessible, eloquent, sensitive, empathetic way. It's a book that acknowledges the imperfections of modern feminism and how to improve, how to be more inclusive, how to be better feminists and people. It includes interviews with people from all sorts of different backgrounds, giving variety and diversity of opinion to the book. It's such an enjoyable, funny and brilliant book that you will read in one breath and will feel a

    You'd be hard-pressed to find a book that talks about feminism in a more accessible, eloquent, sensitive, empathetic way. It's a book that acknowledges the imperfections of modern feminism and how to improve, how to be more inclusive, how to be better feminists and people. It includes interviews with people from all sorts of different backgrounds, giving variety and diversity of opinion to the book. It's such an enjoyable, funny and brilliant book that you will read in one breath and will feel a slight twinge of sadness when you reach the last page.

  • Natalie Talisman

    I had to stop marking out the pages that I need my daughter to read as soon as she’s able to read because then the whole page would have been folded! Absolutely essential reading for everyone.

  • Michael Legge

    He dies of shame in the end.

  • Kat Sanders

    Just read it.

    Some of it is familiar, but it all rings true.

    Accessible and entertaining.

    The insights are intersectional and varied.

    The more privilege you have, the more obligation you have to persuade rather than just vent.

    If we won’t respect the binary and form ourselves into two camps, how will they know who to oppress?

    I want to host a party where everyone wears something they already own but would never dare wear.

    Freeze and friend was new to me but I can see so many times I’ve employed

    Just read it.

    Some of it is familiar, but it all rings true.

    Accessible and entertaining.

    The insights are intersectional and varied.

    The more privilege you have, the more obligation you have to persuade rather than just vent.

    If we won’t respect the binary and form ourselves into two camps, how will they know who to oppress?

    I want to host a party where everyone wears something they already own but would never dare wear.

    Freeze and friend was new to me but I can see so many times I’ve employed that tactic.

    Yes controls your own narrative, but no changes someone else’s.

    We need to stop pushing for a unanimous agreement and start acting.

    I can watch Dirty Dancing guilt-free. I’m going to do that now...

  • Angelique

    "I feel it's my job, as a privileged woman who is not suffering under the most oppressive forces, to do more than let my anger out in random, undirected bursts. I need to turn my anger into influential words and persuasive ideas wherever possible"

    "Fish are so woke"

    DFW works hard and is constantly challenging herself and white woman feminism and is funny sometimes. Total win. She formulates thoughts I've had eloquently and with panache.

    I give it 4 instead of 5 because I felt like although the le

    "I feel it's my job, as a privileged woman who is not suffering under the most oppressive forces, to do more than let my anger out in random, undirected bursts. I need to turn my anger into influential words and persuasive ideas wherever possible"

    "Fish are so woke"

    DFW works hard and is constantly challenging herself and white woman feminism and is funny sometimes. Total win. She formulates thoughts I've had eloquently and with panache.

    I give it 4 instead of 5 because I felt like although the length was justified, with a few more edits, it could have been more potent. (Perhaps the interviews being written like essays? I don't know.)

    I loved it though and should be mandatory reading for all/most feminists in the western world. It's also given me more confidence to get out there and take up space and not apologise and can the whole 'if it's okay, if you don't mind, I know you're busy' shit.

    Also, there were bonus writing tips! Thanks Deborah Frances-White!

    Bits I liked:

    Is it common practice for guys to attack each other savagely on Twitter for not being sufficiently nuanced in the languages they use around the brotherhood? Are boys encouraged to look at their achievements and aspirations as wanting?

    You turning up to a party in trainers or a kitten heel isn't going to make the world a safe, better-represented, more liberated place for women to live in. You could argue that your choices about heels, make-up, romcoms and career help to create an empowered headspace important for your feminist agenda.

    In 2016 the percentage of female CEOs of Fortune 500 companies dropped from 5.5 percent to 4.

    In 1995, 11.3 per cent of national parliamentarians were female, globally. In June 2016 that percentage had risen to 22.8%

    **Let's be honest, most feminists feel guilty, because most feminists are women and women have been trained to feel guilty because it maintains the status quo. Guilt make us feel ashamed and when we are ashamed we feel less entitled to take action.**

    **Capitalism is no friend to feminism...the structure is designed to make the stock feel competitive**

    When people laugh their defences come down...[the podcast is] mostly comedy, it doesn't feel like homework.

    You need influence. You need a plan.

    If you are going to 'call people out,' please be aware that it's highly class and location based.

    ***[on watching Yes to the Dress/brides/bridezillas] I'm watching women be central to proceedings and demand perfection without apology...there is a hidden power in the process because it's one of the only socially acceptable spheres of almost entirely female influence. Some women become 'bridezillas' because it might be the only time in their life that they're in complete control of everything in their domain and they can, at least sometimes, even get their own mothers to back down and bow to their wishes.***

  • Laura

    Firstly, I have to admit my ignorance to the highly successful podcast on which the author created and instead chose this book based on its reviews. Although this reads much like a companion guide to the podcast of the same name, it’s actually easily digestible and thoroughly entertaining as a stand-alone guide to feminism.

    The author covers a large range of topics, although a few I expected to read on were not mentioned or discussed minimally. The book addresses individual topics with passion a

    Firstly, I have to admit my ignorance to the highly successful podcast on which the author created and instead chose this book based on its reviews. Although this reads much like a companion guide to the podcast of the same name, it’s actually easily digestible and thoroughly entertaining as a stand-alone guide to feminism.

    The author covers a large range of topics, although a few I expected to read on were not mentioned or discussed minimally. The book addresses individual topics with passion and expert knowledge on the issues facing women and other marginalised communities in the modern world. There are some fabulous and profound discussions on gender and non conformity within sexuality too. The author also confidently addresses where the feminist movement has to develop and how inequalities still exist within a culture designed to eradicate it.

    The book is handily broken down into chapters and feature reoccurring themes. The author encourages those interested in the feminist cause to create change and promote action. The chapter focusing on confidence and saying “no” was particularly interesting. It certainly caused me to reflect on aspects within my own life that are privileged and yet I have always taken for granted.

    I would have liked to have seen issues such as female genital mutilation, abortion and reproductive rights and the gender pay gap discussed in more detail but I appreciate that these topics alone could fill a whole other book.

    This is a really intriguing guide to those with unanswered questions and assumptions about what feminism means today - and well worth a read for anyone who supports equality.

  • Jo

    The author discusses different aspects of feminism and how it can become more inclusive. But also that you can like romcoms and wearing high heels and still march for women's rights. Agreed with much of what she said but overall I found this quite thought-provoking.

  • Katie Lumsden

    I found this a very interesting read - comprehensive, enjoyable and thought-provoking at every turn.

  • Niamh

    Though I've never listened to 'The Guilty Feminist' podcast, I found this book to be hugely interesting, funny and incredibly personable. Though this is, like many good feminist books, a generalised opinion over certain feminist issues, she does what any good ally should do- when she's unqualified in whatever way to talk about a certain issue, like intersectionality, transgender rights, gender identity, disabilities and more, she lets other people do the talking in the form of interviews.

    Each c

    Though I've never listened to 'The Guilty Feminist' podcast, I found this book to be hugely interesting, funny and incredibly personable. Though this is, like many good feminist books, a generalised opinion over certain feminist issues, she does what any good ally should do- when she's unqualified in whatever way to talk about a certain issue, like intersectionality, transgender rights, gender identity, disabilities and more, she lets other people do the talking in the form of interviews.

    Each chapter is punctuated by her classic line 'I'm a feminist, but...' which can often lead to hilarious admissions of being a guilty feminist, much like Roxane Gay's admission of being a bad feminist. Whether it's exalting the woes of the romantic comedy, admitting to loving the uneducated antics of the Kardashians or spending more time picking a wedding dress than protesting, it's comforting to listen to people who aren't always top-dog feminists all the time.

    Deborah writes with her own personal brand of wit and interest, weaving in her own experiences as a young Jehovah's Witness, to breaking out onto the stand-up comedy scene as a 'female comedian'. I think this book is a continuation of her brilliant podcast, and I am more convinced than ever that I should be listening to it. And so, in the words of the battle cry that she re-writes from Shakespeare's Henry VII:

    'Cry for Women, Feminism and Saint Angelou!'

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