The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

'This really is the "everything you have always wanted to know about feminism but were afraid to ask' manual. From a mind as lucid and witty as it is kind and empathetic comes essential reading for the planet.' EMMA THOMPSON In 2015 I described myself as 'guilty feminist' for the first time. My goals were noble but my concerns were trivial. I wanted desperately for women...

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Title:The Guilty Feminist
Author:Deborah Frances-White
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The Guilty Feminist Reviews

  • Eva

    You'd be hard-pressed to find a book that talks about feminism in a more accessible, eloquent, sensitive, empathetic way. It's a book that acknowledges the imperfections of modern feminism and how to improve, how to be more inclusive, how to be better feminists and people. It includes interviews with people from all sorts of different backgrounds, giving variety and diversity of opinion to the book. It's such an enjoyable, funny and brilliant book that you will read in one breath and will feel a

    You'd be hard-pressed to find a book that talks about feminism in a more accessible, eloquent, sensitive, empathetic way. It's a book that acknowledges the imperfections of modern feminism and how to improve, how to be more inclusive, how to be better feminists and people. It includes interviews with people from all sorts of different backgrounds, giving variety and diversity of opinion to the book. It's such an enjoyable, funny and brilliant book that you will read in one breath and will feel a slight twinge of sadness when you reach the last page.

  • Natalie Talisman

    I had to stop marking out the pages that I need my daughter to read as soon as she’s able to read because then the whole page would have been folded! Absolutely essential reading for everyone.

  • Michael Legge

    He dies of shame in the end.

  • Barry

    An absolute essential for fans of the podcast

  • Mark Farley

    MARK RUINS FEMINISM

    Feminism was invented by a man. And a Frenchman, at that. In 1837. That’s right. His name was Charles Fourier and he was a philosopher. Another man invented The Pill. And Florence Nightingale? She didn’t agree with women being doctors. Yes, that Florence Nightingale. The saintly nurse who can do no wrong.

    Germaine Greer recently said that consistently having bad sex in a marriage was worse than being raped, Susan B. Anthony was against abortion, Betty Friedan was homophobic an

    MARK RUINS FEMINISM

    Feminism was invented by a man. And a Frenchman, at that. In 1837. That’s right. His name was Charles Fourier and he was a philosopher. Another man invented The Pill. And Florence Nightingale? She didn’t agree with women being doctors. Yes, that Florence Nightingale. The saintly nurse who can do no wrong.

    Germaine Greer recently said that consistently having bad sex in a marriage was worse than being raped, Susan B. Anthony was against abortion, Betty Friedan was homophobic and Gloria Steinham didn't approve of transgenders and then changed her mind later in life (when it became trendy and mainstream), reverting to the one stereotype that all women hate being called.

    Then, there’s the suffragettes. I know what you are thinking. Ok, stop Mark. Ruin anything but leave the suffragettes alone. Anyone but them. You’re going to hell for this one.

    Sorry, but they weren’t the heroines they were made out to be. They were both classist and racist. They mostly acted in the interests of well-to-do white women. And Emily Davison didn't "sacrifice herself" for the cause, under the King's horse at Epsom. She was trying to pin a Suffragette banner to it, as it went past. Stupidity killed her.

    But yay, you got the vote! Well done, you. Oh, by the way, it isn't a 100 years since women got the vote. Women under 30 had to wait another ten years, so it's 90 years technically. At least you don’t live in Switzerland, where women didn’t get the vote until 1971 and still couldn’t vote on all issues until 1991.

    Luckily they have all passed on though, the Suffragettes. Because in 2016, and despite all of their brave efforts and achievements, when women finally had the opportunity to break the highest of glass ceilings, and use that vote to elect a woman as President of the United States, they chose not to.

    Hillary Clinton was a former lawyer, Senator, First Lady and Secretary of State, but the majority of white women in America chose instead to vote for a narcissistic, racist, reality TV host cum man baby, with a spotty cartoon mushroom penis who (on many occasions) bragged about sexually assaulting women and thinks that the Saharan desert is in Spain. And he has the hots for his own daughter.

    If I started on that genius, we’d be here all day. So let’s move on.

    Then there’s the #MeToo movement, which was ruined this Summer by a neurotic, out of work soap actress with multiple personality disorder. Roxanne Pallet managed to set back the whole argument and agenda, thus questioning the legitimacy and reliability of the movement in the UK, and undoing all of their good work, by accusing another out-of-work male soap actor of physical abuse and breaking both the news and the internet, in the process.

    The only problem was that she was caught out lying through her manipulative teeth when choosing to do this in the Big Brother house in front of hundreds of cameras and ten (mostly gormless) witnesses. And for those who say this was an unfortunate, isolated incident. It wasn’t. False accusations against men at the hands of vindictive and troubled muppets like Roxanne Fucking Pallett happen every day. She should have been arrested and charged herself. Instead, she turned on the waterworks and was let off.

    Now, I may be being a bit flippant and making light of some of this, when it’s very serious subjects. But what I am trying to do is set you the right tone for the book, The Guilty Feminist.

    Finally, a book by a female writer about women that doesn’t pander and patronize her sisters and isn’t self-serving and aggrandizing.

    Deborah Frances–White, the self-professed Catholic priest of feminism, has written a collection of theories, arguments and opinions from her popular podcast of the same name and celebrates in the same sort of tone all of the ins and outs of the vagenda. Because women don’t get off lightly here either, as the author also highlights the insecurities and most implied and frustrating traits and behaviours of the female race. The contradictions, the hypocrisies and double standards that women fall foul of on a daily basis.

    That, despite all of the best efforts and striving for equality and all that, women have very much failed the initial spirit of the movement. You can march the streets in pussy hats all you want, but you can’t get distracted by the shop windows you go past. During the Women’s march in January 2017, department stores in downtown New York and other cities reported excellent profits and managers interviewed on the news networks on the day put it down to the marchers being distracted by their shiny shoes and face creams.

    And she manages to deftly and quite brilliantly explain Brexit better than anyone else in the media has done, so far:

    “Entitled, smug, privileged, powerful men got in a big red bus and told poor people lies so that they could have even more entitled, smug, privileged power. Even though they know it would make those poor people poorer.”

    Then boils down such basic principles down to clever metaphors and concepts throughout. Workplace sexism is sibling rivalry between twins, Why inequality started with the invention of the plough, the battle of the sexes being tribal survival techniques along with really great practical advice about people and relationships that can be applied everywhere. Plus, witty and insightful interviews with other women of diversity and their experiences.

    She has the balls to highlight what is wrong with feminism and the women who aren’t really helping. And that’s actually refreshing. Because whatever feminists are doing, it’s not working. And that’s not wholly the fault of men. And the sooner, they realise that, the sooner we can live in more of an equal footing. I would certainly prefer that. In fact, I wish women did run the world. There would be a lot less fucking war. If God was a woman, there would be less bigotry and more understanding. And probably war too. But God is clearly a man, I’m afraid.

    That’s the only way I can explain Donald Fucking Trump. That’s the only way I can explain Brexit. That’s the only way I can explain how Gemma Collins from The Only Way is Essex is allowed to be a walking, breathing human being. What other explanation can there be?

    Equality? Pffft. I mean, honestly, we’ve given you Doctor Who and The Ghostbusters. What more do you want?

    (That was a joke)

  • Kat Sanders

    Just read it.

    Some of it is familiar, but it all rings true.

    Accessible and entertaining.

    The insights are intersectional and varied.

    The more privilege you have, the more obligation you have to persuade rather than just vent.

    If we won’t respect the binary and form ourselves into two camps, how will they know who to oppress?

    I want to host a party where everyone wears something they already own but would never dare wear.

    Freeze and friend was new to me but I can see so many times I’ve employed

    Just read it.

    Some of it is familiar, but it all rings true.

    Accessible and entertaining.

    The insights are intersectional and varied.

    The more privilege you have, the more obligation you have to persuade rather than just vent.

    If we won’t respect the binary and form ourselves into two camps, how will they know who to oppress?

    I want to host a party where everyone wears something they already own but would never dare wear.

    Freeze and friend was new to me but I can see so many times I’ve employed that tactic.

    Yes controls your own narrative, but no changes someone else’s.

    We need to stop pushing for a unanimous agreement and start acting.

    I can watch Dirty Dancing guilt-free. I’m going to do that now...

  • Gayle

    This is one of the most inspiring books I’ve ever read. I listened to the podcast from the very early days and have found it useful funny inspiring and heartbreaking. I wondered how this would translate into a book - well it does fabulously!! In the time I’ve been reading this book I’ve said yes to new experiences, no to things I don’t want to do and even stopped apologising for my opinions in emails to colleagues!! I’m not a fan of self help books but this is the beat self help book I’ve ever r

    This is one of the most inspiring books I’ve ever read. I listened to the podcast from the very early days and have found it useful funny inspiring and heartbreaking. I wondered how this would translate into a book - well it does fabulously!! In the time I’ve been reading this book I’ve said yes to new experiences, no to things I don’t want to do and even stopped apologising for my opinions in emails to colleagues!! I’m not a fan of self help books but this is the beat self help book I’ve ever read!

  • Angelique

    "I feel it's my job, as a privileged woman who is not suffering under the most oppressive forces, to do more than let my anger out in random, undirected bursts. I need to turn my anger into influential words and persuasive ideas wherever possible"

    "Fish are so woke"

    DFW works hard and is constantly challenging herself and white woman feminism and is funny sometimes. Total win. She formulates thoughts I've had eloquently and with panache.

    I give it 4 instead of 5 because I felt like although the le

    "I feel it's my job, as a privileged woman who is not suffering under the most oppressive forces, to do more than let my anger out in random, undirected bursts. I need to turn my anger into influential words and persuasive ideas wherever possible"

    "Fish are so woke"

    DFW works hard and is constantly challenging herself and white woman feminism and is funny sometimes. Total win. She formulates thoughts I've had eloquently and with panache.

    I give it 4 instead of 5 because I felt like although the length was justified, with a few more edits, it could have been more potent. (Perhaps the interviews being written like essays? I don't know.)

    I loved it though and should be mandatory reading for all/most feminists in the western world. It's also given me more confidence to get out there and take up space and not apologise and can the whole 'if it's okay, if you don't mind, I know you're busy' shit.

    Also, there were bonus writing tips! Thanks Deborah Frances-White!

    Bits I liked:

    Is it common practice for guys to attack each other savagely on Twitter for not being sufficiently nuanced in the languages they use around the brotherhood? Are boys encouraged to look at their achievements and aspirations as wanting?

    You turning up to a party in trainers or a kitten heel isn't going to make the world a safe, better-represented, more liberated place for women to live in. You could argue that your choices about heels, make-up, romcoms and career help to create an empowered headspace important for your feminist agenda.

    In 2016 the percentage of female CEOs of Fortune 500 companies dropped from 5.5 percent to 4.

    In 1995, 11.3 per cent of national parliamentarians were female, globally. In June 2016 that percentage had risen to 22.8%

    **Let's be honest, most feminists feel guilty, because most feminists are women and women have been trained to feel guilty because it maintains the status quo. Guilt make us feel ashamed and when we are ashamed we feel less entitled to take action.**

    **Capitalism is no friend to feminism...the structure is designed to make the stock feel competitive**

    When people laugh their defences come down...[the podcast is] mostly comedy, it doesn't feel like homework.

    You need influence. You need a plan.

    If you are going to 'call people out,' please be aware that it's highly class and location based.

    ***[on watching Yes to the Dress/brides/bridezillas] I'm watching women be central to proceedings and demand perfection without apology...there is a hidden power in the process because it's one of the only socially acceptable spheres of almost entirely female influence. Some women become 'bridezillas' because it might be the only time in their life that they're in complete control of everything in their domain and they can, at least sometimes, even get their own mothers to back down and bow to their wishes.***

  • Amanda Lagerfeld

    Rating 4.2/5

    I am a feminist but my favorite color is pink and I will purchase almost anything Hello Kitty........

    The word "feminist" can be quite loaded and come with a lot of strings and baggage. Can you call yourself a feminist if you love wearing make-up? What about if you didn't vote for Hillary? Can you still call yourself a feminist? How about if you spent more time picking out your wedding dress then you did on marching in protests?

    The Guilty Feminist tackles all of these issues and so ma

    Rating 4.2/5

    I am a feminist but my favorite color is pink and I will purchase almost anything Hello Kitty........

    The word "feminist" can be quite loaded and come with a lot of strings and baggage. Can you call yourself a feminist if you love wearing make-up? What about if you didn't vote for Hillary? Can you still call yourself a feminist? How about if you spent more time picking out your wedding dress then you did on marching in protests?

    The Guilty Feminist tackles all of these issues and so many more. It explores how you can be any feminist you want to be, or can be. There is no one definition as long as you support other women, allow yourself to be imperfect and do what you can when you can. Frances-White has produced a thought provoking, empowering, relatable, hilarious and sometimes frustrating collection of essays and interviews.

    The Guilty Feminist (from the creator of the podcast by the same name) is a no nonsense, witty look at some of the biggest issues women are facing today. The word "feminist" has been thrown around as an insult and a definer in the last few years more than ever before. We are now facing the 5th wave of feminism and Frances-White is here to hold our hand through the pit falls and fires that have been coming our way. Throughout the book she tackles female issues big and small from catcalling, to learning how to say no; how to support your fellow female, use your privilege to help others and most importantly how to not get into Facebook fights with your friends that are too scared to call themselves Feminists!

    Like 99% of "feminist" books this one will most skipped by men. But my hope is that a few of them will have the guts to pick this book up off their girlfriend/wife/mothers bookshelf and enlighten themselves just a little. I would highly recommend this book to anyone out there who is scared to label themselves a feminist or is proud to scream it from the roof tops!

    Also take note if you haven't yet listened to the Guilty Feminist Podcast I recommend heading over and listening at once!

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