The Wondering Years: How Pop Culture Helped Me Answer Life’s Biggest Questions

The Wondering Years: How Pop Culture Helped Me Answer Life’s Biggest Questions

When you hear the phrase pop culture, you likely think reality television, boy bands or Real Housewives of various cities. While these are elements of popular culture, they aren’t all it has to offer. Pop culture may not cure diseases, topple political regimes, or make scientific breakthroughs, but it does play a vital role in the story of humanity.In fact, it’s pretty har...

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Title:The Wondering Years: How Pop Culture Helped Me Answer Life’s Biggest Questions
Author:Knox McCoy
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The Wondering Years: How Pop Culture Helped Me Answer Life’s Biggest Questions Reviews

  • Tyler Mills

  • Emily Gardner

    Thanks to W Publishing and NetGalley for an early look at a book I've pre-ordered!

    In an effort to explain to my inquisitive four-year-old why saying "God is light" doesn't mean God is, in fact, the moon, I put my English degree to good use describing how metaphors use ideas we already understand to illuminate more complicated concepts.

    That's exactly what

    does in The Wondering Years. In a voice that is humorous, heartwarming, and perceptive, Knox shares pop culture anecdotes and analo

    Thanks to W Publishing and NetGalley for an early look at a book I've pre-ordered!

    In an effort to explain to my inquisitive four-year-old why saying "God is light" doesn't mean God is, in fact, the moon, I put my English degree to good use describing how metaphors use ideas we already understand to illuminate more complicated concepts.

    That's exactly what

    does in The Wondering Years. In a voice that is humorous, heartwarming, and perceptive, Knox shares pop culture anecdotes and analogies that have helped him (and now us) make sense of life and faith. Though I've never been punched in the face (you'll understand after the first chapter) and don't consider myself any sort of pop culture maven*, Knox's stories and insights were infinitely relatable. His ability to transition from funny story to personal reflection is seamless.

    Also, his footnotes are perfection.

    If you you're a Popcast fan, you will love this book.

    If you love Jesus and Netflix, you will love this book.

    If you are a bit dubious about Christianity or have lots of questions, you will love this book.

    If you've ever wondered who the seven suspected antichrists are, you will love this book.

    "There's a cheesy cliche you've probably heard of: 'Not all who wander are lost.' But the truth is, not all who wonder are lost either." - Knox

    *The Popcast with Knox and Jamie is the only reason I ever kind of know what I'm talking about in regards to pop culture. And a lot of times, I don't always know what they're talking about. But I still tune in every Wednesday - it's that good. Same goes with this book. I didn't always catch the references, but it didn't diminish my enjoyment one bit.

  • Kate Mcpherson

    Uh, 10,000 points to Gryffindor because this book is amazing. It's like if Lorelai Gilmore wandering into your living room and started waxing theologic. I have never met Knox, but I'm pretty sure we would be best friends based on the sheer pop culture references that made me laugh. And the section where he talks about converting dogs to Christianity after seeing All Dogs Go To Heaven? Literally on the floor laughing (and yes, I know what literally means). Must read.

  • Laura Tremaine

    Really enjoyed these essays from my friend and fellow podcaster Knox McCoy. I laughed out loud throughout.

  • Emily

    I laughed out loud repeatedly. I think what made it extra funny to me was, as an avid listener of The Popcast, I read the whole book in Knox’s voice. I especially loved the footnotes where he inserted his snarky comments like he would in the podcast as well.

  • Laura

    Knox McCoy must be about the same age as I am, because we have almost all the same pop-culture touchstones (minus, for me, most of the sports references) although I have not kept up with his pace of pop-culture consumption. He grew up in the South so his early faith framework is familiar but certainly more rigid than what I grew up with. Nonetheless, I related strongly to his childhood perspectives. This book definitely made me laugh out loud (That dog-conversion chapter? Golden) and there were

    Knox McCoy must be about the same age as I am, because we have almost all the same pop-culture touchstones (minus, for me, most of the sports references) although I have not kept up with his pace of pop-culture consumption. He grew up in the South so his early faith framework is familiar but certainly more rigid than what I grew up with. Nonetheless, I related strongly to his childhood perspectives. This book definitely made me laugh out loud (That dog-conversion chapter? Golden) and there were almost hints of, and I don't say this lightly, Dave Barry-level humor.

    (Update: Yeah, I don't think this one is for the audience at Servants of Grace. But it is super funny for Christians who grew up in the 80's/90's and he always manages to land the plane by the end of the chapter. No matter how bizarre the story, it ends up illuminating some aspect of his faith.)

  • Carmen Marie

    What's my green light this week?

    As a long time listener of the

    with Knox and Jamie, I was eager to read Knox's book,

    . I was not disappointed by his memoir. He's equal parts humorous and introspective.

    is about the intersection of faith and pop culture. Knox grew up Evangelical in the South. He makes a compelling case about how his touchstones for pop culture taught him nuance somehow filling in the gaps in his faith formation.

    What's my green light this week?

    As a long time listener of the

    with Knox and Jamie, I was eager to read Knox's book,

    . I was not disappointed by his memoir. He's equal parts humorous and introspective.

    is about the intersection of faith and pop culture. Knox grew up Evangelical in the South. He makes a compelling case about how his touchstones for pop culture taught him nuance somehow filling in the gaps in his faith formation. Don't skip the footnotes. They are hilarious. I spent a lot of time watching the WB back in the day. So, yeah, when mentions he was also watching

    , I can't help laugh out loud over a footnote like this:

    Or this one:

    The Popcast may

    , but both Knox and Jamie do their homework and they know how much pop culture actually shapes our lives and helps us make sense of difficult topics. Well done, Knox!

  • Jill Robinson

    At first I was less than impressed. After all, I am a huge Popcast fan and it almost felt like Knox was just throwing around a ton of words and not saying much of anything. But the more I got into it, the deeper it got and Knox’s transparency is greatly appreciated. He admits what we all know about ourselves—we don’t have it all together. But God is so much bigger than that. Well done Knox!

    PS: you can definitely tell this was written by an enneagram 5!

  • Kaytee Cobb

    Plenty of fun and laughs and cunning observations. Audiobook is totally the way to go. Had a great time listening to this on a road trip with my adult sibling and parents. We all found something to laugh at.

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