I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff

I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff

From the co-creator and co-star of the hit series Broad City, a hilarious and poignant collection about love, loss, work, comedy, and figuring out who you really are when you thought you already knew.When Abbi Jacobson announced to friends and acquaintances that she planned to drive across the country alone, she was met with lots of questions and opinions: Why wasn't she g...

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Title:I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff
Author:Abbi Jacobson
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I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff Reviews

  • BiblioBrandie

    I sent the publisher a fangirl email (always with the "I'm a librarian" mention) and begged for an advanced copy of this book. To my surprise, it worked! I quickly read through this collection of essays by one of my favorite funny ladies and her writing does not disappoint. Which really was not a surprise. There is so much to love within these pages...she's hilarious (I couldn't help but hear her voice as I was reading), there are some very touching moments (the long love letters to Ilana and he

    I sent the publisher a fangirl email (always with the "I'm a librarian" mention) and begged for an advanced copy of this book. To my surprise, it worked! I quickly read through this collection of essays by one of my favorite funny ladies and her writing does not disappoint. Which really was not a surprise. There is so much to love within these pages...she's hilarious (I couldn't help but hear her voice as I was reading), there are some very touching moments (the long love letters to Ilana and her mom are two of my favorite chapters), she includes some of her drawings, and there are some revealing moments (won't spoil!). It's exactly what I always hope for in a collection of personal essays. Sad it's over but my daughter was basically reading over my shoulder so she's happy I can pass it on to her now.

  • Rich

    A total delight! Equal parts poignant and funny, Abbi has a really cool perspective.

  • Lauren

    Get the audio book. You won't regret it. Abbi tells her stories and short rants effortlessly. I felt that she was so relatable while discussing her inner conflicts and going through heartbreak. Going on a cross country road trip solo is bad ass in its own but I like that she took the time to do it her way, without taking everyone's advice on must do's (something I'd like to try on my next trip). I really enjoyed the parts where she spoke about her step dad, mom, and Ilana. Now to figure out how

    Get the audio book. You won't regret it. Abbi tells her stories and short rants effortlessly. I felt that she was so relatable while discussing her inner conflicts and going through heartbreak. Going on a cross country road trip solo is bad ass in its own but I like that she took the time to do it her way, without taking everyone's advice on must do's (something I'd like to try on my next trip). I really enjoyed the parts where she spoke about her step dad, mom, and Ilana. Now to figure out how to look at the photos and drawings from the audio book...

  • Natalie Adams

    Listening to Abbi's voice really pushed this into the 5-star arena. As a voice actress on top of her comedic presence, she is able to capture a lovely balance between vulnerability and humor.

  • Janday

    I want to give this book to all of my friends. I want to encourage us to write the shit out because we all need therapists and none of us can afford them. In a world where everything is so damn performative, Abby's voice isn't clear, nor is it fresh: it's one of a rambling, borderline obsessive overthinker. That selfsame voice screaming at us about that one time we mispronounced a word in front of our crush in eighth grade when we're now 35 and it's 3:32am and wehaveameetinginfivehoursforthelove

    I want to give this book to all of my friends. I want to encourage us to write the shit out because we all need therapists and none of us can afford them. In a world where everything is so damn performative, Abby's voice isn't clear, nor is it fresh: it's one of a rambling, borderline obsessive overthinker. That selfsame voice screaming at us about that one time we mispronounced a word in front of our crush in eighth grade when we're now 35 and it's 3:32am and wehaveameetinginfivehoursfortheloveofallthatisholy!

    The Anxiety in Me recognizes the Anxiety in You, Abbi. And I hope more of us can open up and be more honest with ourselves.

  • Amy Polyreader

    Exactly the revitalizing read I needed! Humorous, engaging and self-reflective. I lucky enough to be sent a copy from the publisher pre-release date, and I just devoured this in a few short sittings. Full review to come on the blog!

  • Katie Pelton

    Read this in 24 hours, which is a personal record for this slow reader! Although it’s a bit Eat, Pray, Love of a privileged female getting time and freedom to face heartache, I couldn’t put it down and found it wildly relatable. Plus there are references to Gilmore Girls and My Best Friend’s Wedding. I laughed out loud often and appreciated the slightly neurotic thoughts of an anxious mind.

  • Nat

    I was over the moon excited when I found this was out in the world and also (low-key) mad that I wasn't informed earlier of this release.

    was one of my highlights of September 2017, when I first discovered and watched the series with the release of season four, and featured my commentary and all the details on the show in

    of the month. In hindsight, I guess some things are better left unread, l

    I was over the moon excited when I found this was out in the world and also (low-key) mad that I wasn't informed earlier of this release.

    was one of my highlights of September 2017, when I first discovered and watched the series with the release of season four, and featured my commentary and all the details on the show in

    of the month. In hindsight, I guess some things are better left unread, like angry emails or rant-y reads.

    Going into this having left two disappointing books prior, I was hoping for a pick-me-up in the form of Abbi Jacobson's writing voice. I checked out the audiobook - read by the author - and it was a joy to discover her words read with such intending and meaning; Abbi Jacobson doesn’t just read her words, she lives through them.

    While reading, I also realized that this was my first foray into the author's solo work without Ilana being there to balance out her more every-day-awkwardness. It got me wondering which part of the Broad City duo I essentially enjoy more when they're apart. After reading nearly three chapters, it dawned on me pretty quickly...

    As much as I enjoy a good tangent, I'd like to, at some point in the storyline, reach the bigger picture, you know, the one mentioned in the title and then never elaborated on till the very rapid end... This is usually where Ilana comes in to balance out Abbi's long-winded talks with humor to light up the scene, so I found that aspect to be repeatedly missing in the essays.

    It's just that I'd rather not be taken through pages of discussion on her junk mail disposing routine and what that fully entails with the many different categories they're divided in. By the time she gets to the point, on finding a long-lost letter, I've already forgotten what the essay title was about. And this effect only snowballed the more she went on. It's at this point that I was extremely thankful for the 2X speed on audio.

    It got me wondering whether a certain word count was trying to be met?? Because Abbi Jacobson had so many worthy components to elaborate on (like discussing the actual seventy-year-old letter that reached her, her road trip which starts off the book but isn't mentioned for at least three chapters, the actual relationship she first experienced) but she either skims over the highlights in a quick paragraph or wraps it up in a speedy end, opting to discuss detailed throwaway things . And it made me feel slowly more riled up the more I found random tangents thrown my way.

    I'm perplexed as to why the audiobook is over six hours when that time could've been cut in half with all these rants on

    and building up any possible scenario (that'll never happen) before and after the event... but then the event itself is barely discussed in detail. Like the chase to hunt down the owners of the seventy-year-old letter, which she spent romanticizing in plenty of paragraphs wondering

     when in reality it was wrapped up in one page.

    Nonfiction essays are supposed to be a fun, easy-breezy read for me, like I recently experienced while listening to Anne Bogel's “I'd Rather Be Reading,” which cuts short at just over two hours. I wanted to be left wanting something more, which is what

    excels at with its 20-minute episodes. But this book just left me wanting something

    . I jumped on any opportunity to be distracted in a google search by her mentions in the book, such as her friend's chase after the rightful owner behind the developed film found in a blizzard.

    I can appreciate a long tangent and vibe if it’s on a topic the writer personally cares about and I get to experience the excitement through her words, but Jacobson chose to elaborate on details that are usually cut in the second draft. There's a lot of pages filled with dreaming and fantasizing, but little to no actual time spent on the action of the event. She even acknowledges the same:

    She goes again into an ‘I wonder what will happen…’ spiral when staying for the first time at a B&B on her road trip, instead of just skipping straight ahead to what actually went down. This occurs way too many times in her writing to make the book enjoyable to read for me. The fact is that she build-up so many possibilities in her head of what might happen so that it creates this effect of disappointment when the real-life event finally comes around to being discussed and pales in comparison.

    I mean, this is when you know the rants are bad: 

    Plus: a whole chapter dedicated to all the items in her car for the 10-hour drive ahead.

    This is also where the frustrations hits rock bottom because there are so many moments when it’s acceptable to go in depth with something juicy, like Kelly Rippa holding an article about that same long-lost letter Abbi found from seventy years ago in her mail, which happens way before Broad City, and way before Kelly Rippa even appeared on the show. Like, was that ever mentioned in real life? Did Kelly remember delivering the story? So many details worth to elaborate on but are barely mentioned again. Even something as trivial as her friend’s last name being Bieber.

    Like, sure, go on a tangent about your junk mail and skip over this… Don’t mind me. There comes a point when you spend so much time wrapped up in fiction and fantasy that you tend to forget how simple and great real life can feel, how intimate and true. And I feel like this book lacked the intimate truths I was waiting to connect with, like those feelings evoked after watching a good episode of 

    .

    So it's regrettable the good didn't come to outshine the bad because when Abbi Jacobson focuses on the subject in front of her she shines so brightly in her humor. She nails down so many specifics that had me nodding along. Like her 

    '

    when it comes to her three-week road-trip. In the end, I just wish the author would've spent more time talking about herself, rather than wasting so many pages on unimportant details and scenarios that never came to happen.

    Her insights are on-point:

    If you enjoy long-winded, off-the-page, stream-of-consciousness writing then 

     by Abbi Jacobson might be your kind of book.

    Make your bookish purchase through my Amazon Affiliate:

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  • Kelly Hager

    Confession time: I haven't watched Broad City (although it's been on my radar and I do want to watch; I'll probably binge pretty soon) and I accepted a pitch for this because Cheryl Strayed blurbed the cover. (And because I tend to love memoirs by funny women, regardless of my familiarity with their work.)

    I said that to say this: I am now a huge fan of Abbi Jacobson. This book is as funny as you'd expect (maybe even funnier; suffice to say it's a fantastic read) but she's also incredibly honest.

    Confession time: I haven't watched Broad City (although it's been on my radar and I do want to watch; I'll probably binge pretty soon) and I accepted a pitch for this because Cheryl Strayed blurbed the cover. (And because I tend to love memoirs by funny women, regardless of my familiarity with their work.)

    I said that to say this: I am now a huge fan of Abbi Jacobson. This book is as funny as you'd expect (maybe even funnier; suffice to say it's a fantastic read) but she's also incredibly honest. I'm not sure I've ever related to a stranger as much as I've related to her in this.

    (Her sleep study chapters, you guys. I feel like if you've ever had any problems sleeping, you'll know where this is coming from.)

    I expected to enjoy this book and I expected it to make me even more excited to watch Broad City. I didn't expect to completely love it and read it in a day.

    Highly recommended.

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