The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

From Pulitzer Prize winner and New York Times -bestselling author Deborah Blum, the dramatic true story of how food was made safe in the United States and the heroes, led by the inimitable Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley, who fought for change By the end of nineteenth century, food was dangerous. Lethal, even. "Milk" might contain formaldehyde, most often used to embalm co...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the Twentieth Century
Author:Deborah Blum
Rating:

The Poison Squad: One Chemist's Single-Minded Crusade for Food Safety at the Turn of the Twentieth Century Reviews

  • Jillian Doherty

    Page turning and solicitous! This incredible story widens the view of what we think we know about how our nation’s food. From flood shavings in the chowder, to exactly how much plaster makes sour milk looks just right again – this book is for anyone who loves reading about history that you can’t believe is true.

    Where the Food Explorer took us on a wild ride, discovering where our food came from – this wowzers of a history will make you sooooo glad we had Dr. Wiley on our side ensuring we aren’t

    Page turning and solicitous! This incredible story widens the view of what we think we know about how our nation’s food. From flood shavings in the chowder, to exactly how much plaster makes sour milk looks just right again – this book is for anyone who loves reading about history that you can’t believe is true.

    Where the Food Explorer took us on a wild ride, discovering where our food came from – this wowzers of a history will make you sooooo glad we had Dr. Wiley on our side ensuring we aren’t poisoned daily!

    Galley borrowed from the publisher.

  • Erin

    Absolutely fascinating. I guess I should feel glad that the American political system has always been full of craven, venal blowhards. Frankly we’re all lucky to be alive, given this history of the pure food and drug act.

  • Elizabeth

    A fascinating look at the history behind the FDA and the legislation enacted to protect the American food supply. This book was packed with information but Blum kept things fast paced and easy to digest (pun intended). I thoroughly enjoyed "The Poisoner's Handbook," so I expected to like this one, too, and certainly did!

  • Virginia

    An intense historical narrative about the fight to regulate food in the US. Deborah Blum's book will shock and intrigue you as she goes through the life of Harvey Washington Wiley's whose research and strength pushed legislation to protect the current and next generation of Americans from terrible ingredients food companies added to make their food last longer or produce faster.

    You mouth will drop at her descriptions of formaldehyde being used in milk, green slime getting scrapped off canned me

    An intense historical narrative about the fight to regulate food in the US. Deborah Blum's book will shock and intrigue you as she goes through the life of Harvey Washington Wiley's whose research and strength pushed legislation to protect the current and next generation of Americans from terrible ingredients food companies added to make their food last longer or produce faster.

    You mouth will drop at her descriptions of formaldehyde being used in milk, green slime getting scrapped off canned meat, and whiskey using anything but distilled corn. If you still have a steady stomach, you'll be intrigued by the politics and lobbying used to help food companies keep these terrible practices. Then, prepare to be surprised at the extents Wiley went to show how dangerous these food additives were, including human experimentation. The worst thing about all this? Despite Wiley's hard work, we're still not done yet.

    This book is incredibly fascinating and very well written, propelling you through 19th and 20th century American history and looking at a section you might not have read about before (beyond THE JUNGLE by Upton Sinclair which is talked about in the book!).

    This compulsive read is perfect for American history buffs and would be a "cool" gift for foodies.

  • Margaret Myers

    You know how some things seem like such an entrenched part of our society that we’ve forgotten how they got there? Deborah Blum reveals the story of one those facets of America: food and drug law (did you ever stop to think what “unbleached” flour means, or why labels are so proud of this fact? Mystery solved thanks to this book). Blum details Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley’s decades long quest (1880s-1906) for food and drug regulation, against always-formidable business owner foes and their govern

    You know how some things seem like such an entrenched part of our society that we’ve forgotten how they got there? Deborah Blum reveals the story of one those facets of America: food and drug law (did you ever stop to think what “unbleached” flour means, or why labels are so proud of this fact? Mystery solved thanks to this book). Blum details Dr. Harvey Washington Wiley’s decades long quest (1880s-1906) for food and drug regulation, against always-formidable business owner foes and their governmental allies. Rife with truly disgusting historical detail--congealed rope sent as meat to American soldiers, insects in dry goods, formaldehyde in milk--Blum renders evergreen American philosophies about regulation and capitalism in stark clarity. History isn’t as far away as it feels sometimes, and this book has made this particular legacy feel alive and close--a real accomplishment.

  • Brenda Ayala

    Dude.

    The Industrial Revolution, for all its major leaps toward with invention and innovation, definitely fucked over some people.

    Like

    of people.

    The biggest take away from this nonfiction book is that given the opportunity, big business will screw us over tenfold unless someone holds them accountable.

    Kids died from drinking milk. That’s so mind boggling that I had to reread the paragraphs focused on that. Paragraphs, plural,

    Dude.

    The Industrial Revolution, for all its major leaps toward with invention and innovation, definitely fucked over some people.

    Like

    of people.

    The biggest take away from this nonfiction book is that given the opportunity, big business will screw us over tenfold unless someone holds them accountable.

    Kids died from drinking milk. That’s so mind boggling that I had to reread the paragraphs focused on that. Paragraphs, plural, because it HAPPENED MORE THAN ONCE OVER SEVERAL YEARS.

    This author does an amazing job of compiling all of the information together in a cohesive form. There’s a inordinate amount of information within these pages and while it can get a bit dense and repetitive, it never lost my interest. I’m so glad I had the opportunity to read it and I’m going to make damn sure everybody knows to read it.

    (Or just hold corporations like Coca-Cola accountable)

  • Jill Heather

    I do not think I love the balance in this -- I would have preferred more on the political or more on the science, but this felt unsatisfyingly short on both, somehow. Still a very fascinating book.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.