I Am Sonia Sotomayor

I Am Sonia Sotomayor

Sonia Sotomayor, the first Latina Supreme Court Justice, is the subject of the sixteenth picture book in the New York Times bestselling series of biographies about heroes.This friendly, fun biography series focuses on the traits that made our heroes great--the traits that kids can aspire to in order to live heroically themselves. Each book tells the story of one of America...

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Title:I Am Sonia Sotomayor
Author:Brad Meltzer
Rating:
Edition Language:English

I Am Sonia Sotomayor Reviews

  • Amie

    This was FANTASTIC. My teenager didn't balk at it (too much) and my three year old was engaged. I knew a little bit about Sonia, because we'd read another picture book biography before, but this greatly elaborated on that. I enjoyed it.

  • Michael

    Informative, accessible and inspiring, a book that should inspire many children to reach beyond their dreams. Justice Sotomayor is revealed to be a hardworking, deep-thinking woman who came from absolutely no means to become one of the most influential people in the United States today.

  • Brad Meltzer

    What can I say? Meltzer is my favorite author. Seriously, I can't wait for you to read this book. Chris knocked it out of the universe.

  • Michele Knott

    A fantastic introduction to Sonia Sotomayor. Pairs well with her "Turning Pages" picture book.

  • Shauna Yusko

    Pair with Turning Pages.

  • KC

    Love this series

  • Barbara

    Teachers and caregivers will certainly want to add this title, part of the Ordinary People Change the World series to their libraries. Featuring the first Hispanic and third woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court, the book is quite accessible as it describes Sonia Sotomayor's formative years growing up in the Bronx borough of New York, and how she set and reached various professional goals. Young readers will appreciate the graphic novel format used in telling her inspiring story as well as

    Teachers and caregivers will certainly want to add this title, part of the Ordinary People Change the World series to their libraries. Featuring the first Hispanic and third woman to be appointed to the Supreme Court, the book is quite accessible as it describes Sonia Sotomayor's formative years growing up in the Bronx borough of New York, and how she set and reached various professional goals. Young readers will appreciate the graphic novel format used in telling her inspiring story as well as the challenges she faced with diabetes and the death of her father. The Supreme Court Justice even offers some helpful advice to encourage others who might have been born poor or learned English as a second language. This series is highly addictive, and I cannot imagine a youngster who wouldn't find it entertaining and informative. I know that I enjoyed the book a great deal even though the caricature of Sonia at a later age sometimes seemed a bit odd.

  • Jo Oehrlein

    Bibliography of Sonia Sotomayor's life, explaining how she had never seen a female hispanic lawyer or judge and how she had to push past those lack of examples to do what she has done.

    She was inspired by detectives on TV to seek justice for people and dedicated her life to that.

    Points out that Sonia's Type 1 Diabetes prevented her from becoming a detective, but just treats it very matter-of-fact-ly.

  • Nathan Albright

    How do you make one of the more problematic justices of the Supreme Court into the subject of a gushing hagiography for children?  The author shows the way to manage this through a book that ignores the justice's decisions or her deeply flawed judicial worldview and instead tries to make her into an object of pity, someone who overcomes self-doubt and leverages her background in urban poverty as the diabetic child of Puerto Ricans in New York into a position of more prestigious positions within

    How do you make one of the more problematic justices of the Supreme Court into the subject of a gushing hagiography for children?  The author shows the way to manage this through a book that ignores the justice's decisions or her deeply flawed judicial worldview and instead tries to make her into an object of pity, someone who overcomes self-doubt and leverages her background in urban poverty as the diabetic child of Puerto Ricans in New York into a position of more prestigious positions within the legal establishment of the United States.  The author tries to shoehorn all kinds of subaltern groups and their identity politics into a book that celebrates a country where someone's background is the fastest ticket to being seen as a hero.  It is not someone's position that makes them a hero, or else one would write a book like this about the heroism of President Harding and how he rose from a small town merchant to increasing positions within the politics of Ohio and then a presidency in which he oversaw the return from Wilson's war paranoia into normalacy.  Never mind, come to think of it, that would be a lot better a book than this one or most of the books in this series, even if few would consider Harding a heroic figure.

    Nevertheless, despite its flawed approach, this book does follow the series' pattern of talking a lot about its subject's childhood and background as a way of setting the context for her adult behavior.  Here we have childhood dreams of being a detective, a lot of energy that has a hard time being directed properly, a diagnosis of diabetes that causes her to redirect her ambition to the law, whining about the poor quality of schools in urban New York City, and the idealism encouraged by her college experience.  We see her as homesick and encouraged by others to maximize her potential and we see very little that makes her heroic.  Is one simply a hero for serving as a standard bearer for various subaltern groups?  If so, there is going to be a lot more intolerable material in this series to deal with, and I'm pretty sure I want no part of reading that dreck.  Fortunately, the author doesn't even try to make her positions on things like abortion heroic, as that would be completely unacceptable.  Mercifully, the author does not attempt that impossible task.

    So what we are left with is a book that greatly waters down what is considered heroic.  One used to have to do brave deeds in order to be considered heroic.  There is even a film that tries to portray fellow Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg as a heroine for her stance regarding gender equality, while giving her among the most unpleasant accents possible and similarly avoiding the positions that make her one of America's villains rather than heroes, and the same is the case here.  Being a token member of a subaltern group that succeeds because of politics and whose viewpoints are detrimental to the well-being of the United States and who sits on our high court and has the chance to vote with that unacceptable legal and moral perspective does not make one a hero, it makes our country troubled, and this book and its author have little idea about how to understand this.  If all you want is for children of all backgrounds to be able to dream that they could be any sort of position, that is one thing, but encouraging them to do good deeds and believe the right things would be a far better approach than to appeal to identity politics as this book does.

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