The Collector’s Apprentice

The Collector’s Apprentice

From The Bestselling Author of The Art Forger and The MuralistIt’s the summer of 1922, and nineteen-year-old Paulien Mertens finds herself in Paris—broke, disowned, and completely alone. Everyone in Belgium, including her own family, believes she stole millions in a sophisticated con game perpetrated by her then-fiancé, George Everard. To protect herself from the law and t...

DownloadRead Online
Title:The Collector’s Apprentice
Author:B.A. Shapiro
Rating:

The Collector’s Apprentice Reviews

  • Linda Quinn

    This is another gem from Shapiro. A young woman is preyed upon and tricked by an older con man, leading to the ruin of her family and her banishment from them. The rest of the story moves forward from her banishment and into the past to show how she got there. Full of passion, betrayal and a satisfying denouement this one will keep you hooked.

  • Colleen

    B.A. Shapiro has done it again. If you loved The Art Forger, you will love this one. Mystery, romance, art, and intrigue - what's not to love? Highly recommended and suspenseful. A great novel and a great read. You won't be disappointed - true to character and story line, you won't want to put it down!

  • Linda

    Schemers and scoundrels hide and blend behind the scenes like the blurred textures within an art masterpiece. Within time, though, the eyes focus more readily and true colors are ultimately revealed.

    It's 1922 at a small estate in Belgium and we find Paulien Mertens lost in the pangs of love. Her nineteen years on this earth don't adequately prepare her for the waves of ill-intent by one George Everard. George has presented her with a sizable engagement ring. But what doesn't ring true are his sh

    Schemers and scoundrels hide and blend behind the scenes like the blurred textures within an art masterpiece. Within time, though, the eyes focus more readily and true colors are ultimately revealed.

    It's 1922 at a small estate in Belgium and we find Paulien Mertens lost in the pangs of love. Her nineteen years on this earth don't adequately prepare her for the waves of ill-intent by one George Everard. George has presented her with a sizable engagement ring. But what doesn't ring true are his shifty ways. Paulien convinces her father into investing with ol' George. The aftermath leaves the Mertens family without their art nor their fortune.

    Cast out by her angry family, Paulien heads to Paris. She is forced to reinvent herself including her own name. While keeping ahead of scandal, Paulien becomes Vivienne Gregsby. With very few coins in her handbag, Vivienne rents a tiny rundown apartment. She takes on new employment while working in a millinery shop, becoming a waitress, an art model, and eventually a translator. But this last option will open a heavy door that will drastically change Vivienne's life forever.

    Vivienne will meet Dr. Edwin Bradley, an American art collector who wishes to deal with avant-garde galleries. B.A. Shapiro intermixes her story with the likes of Henri Matisse and actual historical figures of the day as Bradley employs Vivienne to assist him in acquiring a high-end collection. We will find ourselves in the salon of Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas as well. Shapiro develops Vivienne with a fine-tuned artistic sensibility. As Bradley's collection grows, so does Vivienne's desire to re-engage with her family's lost art. She also wishes to once again connect with the conniving George. But will this ambition be her eventual downfall?

    I enjoyed The Collector's Apprentice as Shapiro wraps it in true artistic appreciation. But Shapiro also adds heavy brushstrokes of human greed and desire. Her characters take on a different hue when placed in iffy situations. My favorites of Shapiro are still The Muralist and The Art Forger. You may want to check these out as well. Shapiro is a master at blending the art world with the art of fiction.

    I received a copy of The Collector's Apprentice through NetGalley for an honest review. My thanks to Algonquin Books and to B.A. Shapiro for the opportunity.

  • Julie Klein

    In The Collector's Apprentice, B.A. Shapiro takes readers back in time to the art world of the 1920s where we meet Matisse, Gertrude Stein and other visionaries of the day. It's a wonderful historical novel for anyone interested in art and art history, in particular. The story is well written, fairly fast paced, and exciting. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoyed Shapiro's earlier work, The Art Forger.

  • Natalie

    This is an incredibly interesting novel about the young woman who worked with the fictioalized Albert Barnes in assembling the magnificent Barnes Collection in Philadelphia. Vivienne had been duped by a con man and lost her comfort and her family. She totally reinvents herself and finds work as an assistant to the millionaire art collector. She works with him in Europe and ultimately moves to Philadelphia as his aide.

    What should have been a happy change in her troubled life, becomes a nightmare

    This is an incredibly interesting novel about the young woman who worked with the fictioalized Albert Barnes in assembling the magnificent Barnes Collection in Philadelphia. Vivienne had been duped by a con man and lost her comfort and her family. She totally reinvents herself and finds work as an assistant to the millionaire art collector. She works with him in Europe and ultimately moves to Philadelphia as his aide.

    What should have been a happy change in her troubled life, becomes a nightmare. Vivienne is wrongly accused and winds up in prison. There are endless twists and turns within the novel. The author also makes use of many famous people and gives the reader sufficient information to place them.

    This is a fine read, definitely should be followed by a visit to the Barnes in its magnificent new home.

    Every reader should be sure to read the Author ‘s Note at the end of the book which explains the clever manipulation of the real and the fictional.

  • Rljulie

    I’m probably too close to the material to read this objectively, but it’s a frolicking and fun art-centered historical fiction, even when it gets the “history” part wackily and egregiously wrong. My least favorite aspect is how the main character seems to have time-travelled from the 21st century, with its mores, attitudes and expectations—so much so that at one point she’s trying to figure out how to work her art history degree into a curatorial career. And yet this is supposed to happen in the

    I’m probably too close to the material to read this objectively, but it’s a frolicking and fun art-centered historical fiction, even when it gets the “history” part wackily and egregiously wrong. My least favorite aspect is how the main character seems to have time-travelled from the 21st century, with its mores, attitudes and expectations—so much so that at one point she’s trying to figure out how to work her art history degree into a curatorial career. And yet this is supposed to happen in the 1920’s? And then you’ve got Matisse gluing paper to the gallery walls...yeah, I got distracted whenever the research got sloppy. As I said, I’m definitely too close to the material. But I appreciate the mystery just the same—it kept me turning pages. Someday, someone is going to write a really good bio of Dr. Barnes, art collector, including the scandals, sex, outrages, art world gossip, and naughty parts, and THAT is going to be a terrific five-star read. Until then, we’ll just have to make do with this fictional one.

    [Book Expo ARC 2018]

  • Daniel Villines

    This is my second novel by Shapiro. The first,

    , was impressive. She used the magic of words to make paintings come alive so that they could be loved by the reader as they were loved by her main character; just as art has been loved by me from time-to-time. And while the novel was technically a mystery novel, this tired format took a backseat to the power and beauty of art.

    Almost in direct contrast with

    ,

    flips the balance of art and mystery

    This is my second novel by Shapiro. The first,

    , was impressive. She used the magic of words to make paintings come alive so that they could be loved by the reader as they were loved by her main character; just as art has been loved by me from time-to-time. And while the novel was technically a mystery novel, this tired format took a backseat to the power and beauty of art.

    Almost in direct contrast with

    ,

    flips the balance of art and mystery around. I was hoping for another journey through art, but most of this novel’s focus is on the mystery. Shapiro uses time and story to mask truths that are predestined to be revealed at the end of the book. The reader is simply following a string through a maze.

    I think that Shapiro could be a better writer rather than one that needs to rest upon mystery novels and it's disheartening to see the mystery novel format taking hold over her ability to write beautifully about art. Given the pure joy of experiencing her talent in making art come alive, I know there is an even better novel in her waiting to be written.

  • Laura Rash

    A Ponzi scheme leads a woman to start a new life with a new identity in the art world. Just not my cup of tea tho I enjoyed her last book.

    This was a Goodreads win.

  • Jeanette

    No rating. I couldn't imagine giving it more than 2 stars for my own read. I got nearly to the 1/2 way point and all the others in my TBR pile called out to me. Just too many good ones there.

    It's about a women of 20 in 1922 who makes a new life for herself in Paris (working as an agent within the art sales of that period) because of a Ponzi scheme fall out with her former fiance and her entire wealthy family. Formerly wealthy- the Ponzi scheme, you know.

    Those readers here who are Romance genre l

    No rating. I couldn't imagine giving it more than 2 stars for my own read. I got nearly to the 1/2 way point and all the others in my TBR pile called out to me. Just too many good ones there.

    It's about a women of 20 in 1922 who makes a new life for herself in Paris (working as an agent within the art sales of that period) because of a Ponzi scheme fall out with her former fiance and her entire wealthy family. Formerly wealthy- the Ponzi scheme, you know.

    Those readers here who are Romance genre lovers and Paris sighers of gushing Seine placements will enjoy this one. Possibly. It's not my style of effusive writing or of principles' moods/abilities. Either. I did enjoy the Art Forger although I did find it plodding. This one also holds tons of instructive Post-Impressionist painting and sculpture of various types minutia and celeb artist intersect. None of which seems remotely possible to me, btw.

    Absolutely not my cup of tea. Writing or plot. I would also categorize it as Chick Lit.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.