Seaweed Chronicles: A World at the Water’s Edge

Seaweed Chronicles: A World at the Water’s Edge

“You might not expect unfettered passion on the topic of seaweed, but Shetterly is such a great storyteller that you find yourself following along eagerly.” —Mark Kurlansky “Seaweed is ancient and basic, a testament to the tenacious beginnings of life on earth,” writes Susan Hand Shetterly in this elegant, fascinating book. “Why wouldn’t seaweeds be a protean life source f...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Seaweed Chronicles: A World at the Water’s Edge
Author:Susan Hand Shetterly
Rating:

Seaweed Chronicles: A World at the Water’s Edge Reviews

  • Maura Muller

    Beautiful.

    "Wild places will teach us, if we let them, if we pay attention."

    I picked this book up as an ARC at Library Journal's Day of Dialog for my son who is studying to be a marine scientist in Maine. I began reading it to see if he might enjoy it. I know he will treasure it. I could not put it down.

    For anyone who has ever enjoyed a walk along a shoreline, or loves eating seafood; clams, lobster, shrimp, cod, haddock. Maybe you love science like me, or the ocean. Perhaps you vacation in Maine

    Beautiful.

    "Wild places will teach us, if we let them, if we pay attention."

    I picked this book up as an ARC at Library Journal's Day of Dialog for my son who is studying to be a marine scientist in Maine. I began reading it to see if he might enjoy it. I know he will treasure it. I could not put it down.

    For anyone who has ever enjoyed a walk along a shoreline, or loves eating seafood; clams, lobster, shrimp, cod, haddock. Maybe you love science like me, or the ocean. Perhaps you vacation in Maine or have dreamed of visiting there. You might be an avid birder, or love exploring tidepools. This is not a book only about seaweed, but about the people who live alongside and work and study coastal habitats. It is about our interconnectedness. Shetterly writes in her acknowledgements, "This book is about the past and the present, but also, and perhaps especially, it points to the future. As I wrote it, my grandchildren were my compass. They will inherit, as will all our children and grandchildren, what we leave for them of the wild." It is a beautiful book. Buy it! Read it. Share it.

  • Corinne

    I found this book fascinating. The Seaweed Chronicles explores the seaweed harvest in Maine, interweaving the importance of seaweed in coastal ecosystems, where every creature's life depends upon another. Shetterly takes us through the complicated debates between commercial harvesters, local harvesters and conservation efforts. Briefly describing the boom and bust of Maine fisheries, she makes the case for caution, consideration, compassion and thoughtfulness with new seaweed harvesting industry

    I found this book fascinating. The Seaweed Chronicles explores the seaweed harvest in Maine, interweaving the importance of seaweed in coastal ecosystems, where every creature's life depends upon another. Shetterly takes us through the complicated debates between commercial harvesters, local harvesters and conservation efforts. Briefly describing the boom and bust of Maine fisheries, she makes the case for caution, consideration, compassion and thoughtfulness with new seaweed harvesting industry, as well as other conservation efforts. Furthermore, Shetterly is an excellent writer; I felt like I was beside her on the rocky coast of Maine, with cold sea spray on my face, looking out at the seaweed curling in the waves. This book will make you care about seaweed! You'll be rooting for all of the passionate, hard-working people featured in this book who are fighting to preserve our natural resources and create a sustainable and responsible seaweed harvest.

  • Celina
  • Elentarri

    Seaweed Chronicles explores the harvest of seaweed in the Gulf of Maine. This book is about relationships - relationships between the local people, large scale commerce, conservationists, seaweed, and all the species that depend on seaweed in one way or another. Shetterly provides us with the personal stories of individual people who work and live at the shore, about the local ecology, about the past, present and ultimately about the future. I found the book eloquently written, interesting and i

    Seaweed Chronicles explores the harvest of seaweed in the Gulf of Maine. This book is about relationships - relationships between the local people, large scale commerce, conservationists, seaweed, and all the species that depend on seaweed in one way or another. Shetterly provides us with the personal stories of individual people who work and live at the shore, about the local ecology, about the past, present and ultimately about the future. I found the book eloquently written, interesting and informative, but lacking in detail about the biology of seaweed as opposed to seaweed harvesting. Photographs and a locality map would also have been nice.

  • Belle

    This was absolutely a wonderful and informative read. Before I get into the specifics of all the things I liked and didn’t, however, I would like to talk about my own feelings on the subject matter at hand. Reading this book frustrated me immensely. I hated reading about all this disappearing wildlife, and its habitat, and not being able to do anything about it. I was even more frustrated when Shetterly described the efforts being made to stop the industries that are trashing habitat and chewing

    This was absolutely a wonderful and informative read. Before I get into the specifics of all the things I liked and didn’t, however, I would like to talk about my own feelings on the subject matter at hand. Reading this book frustrated me immensely. I hated reading about all this disappearing wildlife, and its habitat, and not being able to do anything about it. I was even more frustrated when Shetterly described the efforts being made to stop the industries that are trashing habitat and chewing up seafloor, and the readiness of certain key individuals to kiss up to these industries instead of working to preserve these wild resources for our future. I really hope that, if not this book, then something else will have a profound effect on our society, and that much like the birds of Silent Spring, the creatures of Seaweed Chronicles will be saved before it is too late.

    Putting aside my frustration with out species, here are some of the things that caught my eye and I enjoyed reading about in Seaweed Chronicles:

    1. Complexity of ecosystems – the ecosystem of any area is a complex thing. The ocean, while seemingly self-contained and less complicated, actually is awe-inspiring in its complexity. I never really realized just how much all the different species and habitats affect each other, and just how much the temperature, acidity, and currents of the ocean can affect these interlocking species. If you don’t think the ocean in complex, or that there are many many resources worth saving, read this book. It may appear to be about seaweed, but in reality it is about the many separate wild lives that seaweed supports.

    2. Political and cultural effects – Even more shocking than the complexity of the ocean and the sheer amount of life that seaweed supports was the realization that this industry has enormous political and cultural potential, in both cases – whether the seaweed is conserved or completely destroyed. I got to read about the effects of the nuclear reactor in Fukushima, and about the poverty in the Phillipines. I never realized just how much these seemingly unimportant seaweeds tie us all together. Reading about all this was most definitely eye opening.

    3. Personal stories – my favorite part about the book was actually not the global impact it conveyed, but the personal, down to earth people that encapsulate the global reach of seaweed. I really enjoyed reading about all the scientists’ stories, all the fishermen and gatherers for whom seaweed is actually a way of life. I think its really hard to get people to connect to a nonfiction read, but Shetterly really draws you in with her ability to relate these real world figures through the pages. Reading about them and their way of life made me more aware of my own actions and the increasing need of awareness in others.

    I have little to say in terms of what I didn’t like, but one thing that I could recommend to the author, and that would have made the read a little bit easier would be the addition of graphics.There were no images or graphs and I ended up having to draw in the more detailed explanations to make sense of them. Perhaps someone understanding something about seaweed, or having a background in it, would not need help in this, but in my personal experience, it was a little confusing. There is a glossary at the beginning of the book, but as it is missing pictures of the species described, I didn’t find it to be much help.

  • Daniel

    I like to eat the 99 cent seaweed from the grocery store so I though I would want to eat I mean read a book about seaweed. I am having writers block about this review. I thought it was interesting to learn about the issues surrounding seaweed harvesting in Maine. For that matter I had no idea that seaweed was harvested in Maine. This was an entertaining book to read. I don't think I need to write more than that. I enjoyed reading it.

  • Nina

    This was a nice calm, slow read. I was expecting more of an overall view on seaweed and it turned out to mostly be an intimate portrayal of the seaweed industry in Maine. As such, it was focused more on people than on seaweed and the animals that depend on it (I felt). It serves as a good read on how we're more dependent on seaweed than we realize, and how we're doomed to keep repeating over-fishing stories of the recent past unless we set down some stricter regulations and answer some core ques

    This was a nice calm, slow read. I was expecting more of an overall view on seaweed and it turned out to mostly be an intimate portrayal of the seaweed industry in Maine. As such, it was focused more on people than on seaweed and the animals that depend on it (I felt). It serves as a good read on how we're more dependent on seaweed than we realize, and how we're doomed to keep repeating over-fishing stories of the recent past unless we set down some stricter regulations and answer some core questions about our consumption.

  • Daniel Farabaugh

    This book improved as it went along. It took its time finding a coherent narrative and I would have liked more technical information about seaweed itself to balance out the human interest info.

  • Yodamom

    I can't wait to read this. I have loved seaweed, diving in kelp forests, seaweed harvesting, exploring it's amazing uses since I was 12.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.