There Will Be No Miracles Here: A Memoir

There Will Be No Miracles Here: A Memoir

The testament of a boy and a generation who came of age as the world came apart--a generation searching for a new way to live.Casey Gerald comes to our fractured times as a uniquely visionary witness whose life has spanned seemingly unbridgeable divides. His story begins at the end of the world: Dallas, New Year's Eve 1999, when he gathers with the congregation of his gran...

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Title:There Will Be No Miracles Here: A Memoir
Author:Casey Gerald
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There Will Be No Miracles Here: A Memoir Reviews

  • Tina Panik

    Unlike any book, or any memoir, I have ever read. Casey’s honesty is equal parts shame and pride, brains and ignorance, hope and despair. His story is still unfolding, and I’ll be first in line for a follow up volume...

    This was an ARC from Book Expo NYC, where I saw Casey speak at a dinner that left everyone in tears.

  • Mehrsa

    I read a lot of memoirs. I love memoirs. This is one of the best I've ever read. It's so beautifully written, so honest, and so timely. The perfect trifecta of a memoir.

  • Bookreporter.com Biography & Memoir

    Casey Gerald, the author of this magical mystical tour, is a Yale grad, football star and business maven who was raised in poverty. In his 30s, he is still defining himself by a standard that includes equal parts angst, irony and glimmers of hope.

    Casey’s father was a football star back in the day when black college players were a rarity. He was also absent for much of his son’s adolescence, reappearing as a reformed addict whose redemption was sufficient to earn him a role as an evangelical prea

    Casey Gerald, the author of this magical mystical tour, is a Yale grad, football star and business maven who was raised in poverty. In his 30s, he is still defining himself by a standard that includes equal parts angst, irony and glimmers of hope.

    Casey’s father was a football star back in the day when black college players were a rarity. He was also absent for much of his son’s adolescence, reappearing as a reformed addict whose redemption was sufficient to earn him a role as an evangelical preacher. Casey’s mother also disappeared, her reasons never fully defined and her reemergence in his life fraught with misunderstanding. A sister was an example and a mainstay for the young man grappling with big issues. The family lived in public housing in a black section of Dallas, yet Casey somehow got the impression that being black in the US was a positive. It wasn’t until his college years that he began to understand that being black might mean having “so little money in our bank accounts, so little food on our tables, so few books in our classrooms…”

    In a series of remarkable coincidences, the boy who played football in the projects was drafted to play football for Yale, where he found out that he could write. By that time, he also had realized that he was gay, giving him yet another barrier to push back at. In the later stage of his college career, he became a campus leader of his African American cohort and was a finalist for a Rhodes scholarship. Free from the restraints of education for a while, he drifted, but got back into the swim with an MBA from Harvard; helped found MBAs Across America, aimed at helping people in the hinterlands make it as entrepreneurs; and then took a sabbatical from everything else to write this hugely fascinating autobiography.

    Casey’s professors at Yale were certainly correct: the man can write. His stream-of-consciousness tell-all style captures the reader from the opening segment in which he explains the book’s title (no spoilers here). He can make almost any subject simultaneously painfully hilarious and wistfully sad, as so much of his life has encompassed that paradox. He confesses that when asked, as part of his interview for a Rhodes scholarship, what book he had most recently read, at that point he had never actually completely read any single book, though he did delve into such diverse tomes as BLACK LIKE ME and JAMES AND THE GIANT PEACH. In speaking of his highly dysfunctional family, Casey depicts their interactions as something like “a blaxploitation Fellini movie.” Yet his spiritual side is quietly evident at times. There is one family member, a cherished niece, who he refuses to sully with his sorrow or his sarcasm, because “I like that baby.”

    This is a life in progress, one senses, rather than a mere memoir. The reader undoubtedly will feel that, as much as Casey Gerald can and will retreat into his mental world again and again, he is also destined and determined to do good things and take justifiable pride in their accomplishment.

    Reviewed by Barbara Bamberger Scott

  • Tikyna Dandridge

    I’ve read the physical book twice and listened to audiobook once, so I offer advice to the “casual reader.” First, just brace yourself and be comfortable sitting in paradox. This is not the glorified story of Casey Gerald’s “brand.” Casey chose to write about another trajectory and I’m so happy because I did not want another, “started from the bottom, now I’m here memoir.” Now that I’m done, I celebrate Casey’s human-ness before any of his accomplishments.

    I’ve been familiar with Mr. Gerald’s “a

    I’ve read the physical book twice and listened to audiobook once, so I offer advice to the “casual reader.” First, just brace yourself and be comfortable sitting in paradox. This is not the glorified story of Casey Gerald’s “brand.” Casey chose to write about another trajectory and I’m so happy because I did not want another, “started from the bottom, now I’m here memoir.” Now that I’m done, I celebrate Casey’s human-ness before any of his accomplishments.

    I’ve been familiar with Mr. Gerald’s “achievements” since 2012, and this book set the record straight through his own words. Mr. Gerald reintroduced Casey in this book, and I am here for this human. The audio proves that Gerald’s storytelling and oration is harmonious artistry. Reading is better once you appreciate Gerald’s delivery style, so I urge you to go listen to him speak before you do yourself a disservice by becoming lost in his written words.

    Casey introduces you to his family (his dirt) and their impact on him. This story also gives insight into the seeds of knowledge and lived experiences that grew Gerald into his many ways of knowing. A recipe for making this read phenomenal: know when to pause, even if it’s in the middle of a sentence, let some sentences/paragraphs/chapters breathe, leave and come back with a different version of self, remove predispositions, give yourself time to read, and if you really must, take notes to keep up, but move through this beautiful memoir until its completion.

    This book is for the outcast, radical, and revolutionary. It is also for the “token,” the person who’s trying to figure it out, and for the person who “knows” where they’re going. Casey paints a vivid picture of the unintended consequences of the American dream and delves into the intersectional axes of “success.” Just brace yourself. Casey is going to get you where you want to go if you just shut up (mentally, physically, spiritually, and emotionally) and let him drive.

    Best memoir I’ve read in years, I didn’t know I needed something different until Casey Gerald delivered it to me on a platinum platter.

  • Teresa

    I was asked to read this ARC/memoir for an honest review. It is already receiving notable buzz from many reliable, reputable sources - Lissa Muscatine (One of the owners of Politics & Prose) and Colm Toibin (Author) to name two. And, the true life story of Casey Gerald's rise from "rags to riches" is truly astonishing in the way only true stories can be.

    The book begins at a religious revival with 12 year old Casey discovering doubt for the first time in his life. He grew up in Texas with a

    I was asked to read this ARC/memoir for an honest review. It is already receiving notable buzz from many reliable, reputable sources - Lissa Muscatine (One of the owners of Politics & Prose) and Colm Toibin (Author) to name two. And, the true life story of Casey Gerald's rise from "rags to riches" is truly astonishing in the way only true stories can be.

    The book begins at a religious revival with 12 year old Casey discovering doubt for the first time in his life. He grew up in Texas with a father who following a legendary football career descends into drug use and a mother who battled mental illness. His sister and other female family members were the ones who saved Casey - saved him from bullying, saved him from homelessness and saved him from floating through school with indifferent, meaningless class assignments. Casey improbably pursues football in high school as a way to connect with his father's victorious history. Usually 3rd string and warming the bench, he is unexpectedly given a chance in one game's desperate attempt for victory and ends up scoring a touchdown. This play is repeated and he finally has what he wants - a spot on varsity and some respect. From this unlikely point, he begins his ascent to recognition and is ultimately offered a football scholarship to Yale. Everyone that has influence over Casey's decision advises him to take it - to make his high school proud and to be an example of success for his town. From his first visit to the campus through his first semester, he writes of his struggle to fit in to a place and a people so different than anything he has ever experienced before.

    What makes this memoir so poignant is the seemingly insurmountable climb that Casey has accomplished as he goes on to become a Rhodes scholar finalist and attend Harvard Business School. But, it is also his brutal honesty about the conflicts in his life that create such empathy that you feel devastated when he describes feeling so alone in the world and his bouts of sobbing without reason. Nothing is ever easy, but for Casey, what is the personal cost? How do some people stay positive in an uncertain world full of inequities - some just due to your station in life at birth? This is the gift the reader receives from selecting and reading diverse books. It creates compassion. A brilliant, spiritual young man searching for answers in life, a unique, true-life narrative, and a writer's voice worth reading. Look for this release in October 2018.

  • Germaine Irwin

    I think this is a fabulous book, a life so far lead with no shortage of problems, naïveté, desire, strength, foolishness, and enlightenment- just like many of us and also very different from many of us. He shows us his path without judgements (except for himself) and thus shows us a way to relate experiences while also opening our eyes to other truths.

  • Anne

    From his childhood in Oak Cliff, Texas, then to Yale, Harvard Business School, and Wall Street, Casey Gerald moved from one hard won opportunity to another, striving to excel but experiencing dissatisfaction with the guises he wore to be what others expected of him.

    I found Casey’s story riveting and his writing absolutely beautiful. Though at times his despair was devastating he shares it with honesty and often humor. The reader is left not knowing what comes next for Casey but eager to see whe

    From his childhood in Oak Cliff, Texas, then to Yale, Harvard Business School, and Wall Street, Casey Gerald moved from one hard won opportunity to another, striving to excel but experiencing dissatisfaction with the guises he wore to be what others expected of him.

    I found Casey’s story riveting and his writing absolutely beautiful. Though at times his despair was devastating he shares it with honesty and often humor. The reader is left not knowing what comes next for Casey but eager to see where he goes.

  • Cherise Wolas

    An interesting memoir. A coming of age tale, of a young queer black boy. Rags to riches. From the other side of the river in Dallas in 1999, in a family of preachers, with a father who was a star football player, and then became a drug addict, a bipolar mother who disappears, a boy who finds himself at Yale, etc. There is fury and poetry in some of the prose that makes it shimmer.

  • Lily

    I tried to force myself through this book and succeeded through it for awhile. It might have a message somewhere in there about who Casey is/was and what he has learned. Obviously, he had an unsettled childhood from what I did read. I do not want to wade through the rest of the book to find out the moral of the story (if there is one) because of the coarseness of the narrative and language. It was interesting to hear the lingo of his world.

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