The World of Lore: Dreadful Places

The World of Lore: Dreadful Places

Captivating stories of the places where human evil has left a nefarious mark, featuring stories from the podcast Lore--now a streaming television series--including "Echoes," "Withering Heights," and "Behind Closed Doors" as well as rare material.Sometimes you walk into a room, a building, or even a town, and you feel it. Something seems off--an atmosphere that leaves you o...

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Title:The World of Lore: Dreadful Places
Author:Aaron Mahnke
Rating:

The World of Lore: Dreadful Places Reviews

  • Jessica

    Thanks to Del Rey for the free copy in exchange for my honest review.

    Since picking up Slenderman recently, I have been absolutely fascinated with folklore, specifically the new generation of digital folklore. However, it was nice going back to the folklore that brought us the monsters and places that we would scary each other with in campfire stories.

    Both of these editions in The World of Lore series were very engrossing to read. For Dreadful Places we are brought all over the world to examine

    Thanks to Del Rey for the free copy in exchange for my honest review.

    Since picking up Slenderman recently, I have been absolutely fascinated with folklore, specifically the new generation of digital folklore. However, it was nice going back to the folklore that brought us the monsters and places that we would scary each other with in campfire stories.

    Both of these editions in The World of Lore series were very engrossing to read. For Dreadful Places we are brought all over the world to examine different stories involving New Orleans, ghost ships, the American colonies, and even out to Scotland. These are broken up into smaller sections for each location – so the readers get a good introduction and brief history on all of them. Of course with any kind of book like this there will be some stories that hold the interest of readers more than others, so the short sections make it easy to fly through them.

    I think the creepiest ones for me were the ones in New Orleans. I’ve visited family there many times and had no idea. I will definitely be thinking of these the next time I’m in the area. Mahnke does an incredible job setting the scene with some spine chilling tales.

    After reading Dreadful Places I picked up Monstrous Creatures (which had been hanging out on my shelves for awhile). This one I was really excited for because the folklore surrounding the monsters we grew up hearing about is something I didn’t know much about. Vampires, ghosts, dolls, and more are covered in this book. Each has a detailed background and some were more unsettling than others.

    Overall, if you’re looking for something that reads like fiction then this might be on the dry side for you. From what I’ve heard, if you’ve been an avid listener of the podcast some of these stories are recycled from there. As someone that hasn’t listened to the Lore podcast, these were all new to me! I may have to start listening to some of the podcast – I’ve never really been a podcast listener. With the layout of these stories it is incredibly easy to pick this one up and put it down without getting lost. I would highly recommend this to anyone that is curious about the topic of folklore.

  • Rachael  Fryman

    If you are a fan of the Lore podcast, you will love this next installment of The World of Lore. This edition takes readers all over the world to some of the most haunted and terrifying places around the globe. Some of my favorites that were included in this book are tales from Savanah and New Orleans, the Dyatlov Pass, the Bell Witch Cave, and the many asylums and jails sprinkled through America and Europe.

  • Erikka

    This was just as I expected: a pretty complete retelling of all the stories from the Lore podcast that involve a spooky place or creepy setting. I've loved this entire trilogy, mostly because I adore the Lore podcast. That being said, this one was especially great because it contained my favorite ever Lore story (the King, about a lighthouse on an island. Ep 35) followed immediately by the story of the Dyatlov pass mystery. When a mystery contains the phrase "her tongue and eyeballs were mysteri

    This was just as I expected: a pretty complete retelling of all the stories from the Lore podcast that involve a spooky place or creepy setting. I've loved this entire trilogy, mostly because I adore the Lore podcast. That being said, this one was especially great because it contained my favorite ever Lore story (the King, about a lighthouse on an island. Ep 35) followed immediately by the story of the Dyatlov pass mystery. When a mystery contains the phrase "her tongue and eyeballs were mysteriously missing", you know that's going to be a good scary story. Which is right up my alley. From asylums to haunted houses, graveyards to cities, if you want to be scared out of ever traveling again, pick this up.

  • Sara

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    The latest instalment in the ‘Lore’ series, this follows the stories that surround the dark and sinister places in our lore. As usual it’s easy to read, with a friendly and familiar writing style that lends itself well to these types of stories. It’s as though the writer is talking around a camping fire with old friends, relaying spooky stories - which is exactly how these tales should be told.

    The stories and places covered range

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    The latest instalment in the ‘Lore’ series, this follows the stories that surround the dark and sinister places in our lore. As usual it’s easy to read, with a friendly and familiar writing style that lends itself well to these types of stories. It’s as though the writer is talking around a camping fire with old friends, relaying spooky stories - which is exactly how these tales should be told.

    The stories and places covered range from New Orleans, Scottish castles, the American colonies and ghost ships and it’s very good at dipping the readers toe into this range of stories and folklore that can then be followed up in greater depth by the reader if they want to. It never lingers too long on one story or subject, offering an introduction and background to the tale and a brief outline before moving on. This meant that if one story didn’t intrigue me, I was quickly swept up into the next one, and the next. I was particularly taken with the sections on New Orleans and ghost ships. These areas were deeply atmospheric and creepy, with unexplained tales that were genuinely chilling.

    The first section is very ‘America’ centric, and I was a little less interested in these stories because of their lack of richness and history. America itself is a relatively new country in my eyes, and somewhat lacks the magical and ethereal elements that more ancient cultures have in abundance. I also found it was quite flippant at times in its portrayal of slavery and the associated atrocities.

    However, the later chapters do branch out into the wider world and this is where the book came into its own as it allowed for a broader scope in stories. Folklore is so fascinating, and so unique to each culture and local area that I felt it was necessary to do this. It’s an organic thing, that evolves and changes with the people, as well as helping to join a community together through socialisation and the author does well to get this across here. It’s evident he has a passion for the subject, and a need to spread these stories like our ancestors did. It’s a way of keeping the tales alive.

    Another great addition to the ‘Lorek series. I really enjoy these books, and this is perfect to read at this time of year for a creepy little night in.

  • Geoffrey

    (Note: I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley)

    Aaron Mahnke's third book takes its readers on a journey to an array of places that have all been permanently marked by their respective dark pasts.

    That this work (like the others) is a "best of" collection from his podcast becomes overly clear early on with a definite repetitiveness in the first few sections that isn't noticeable when they're audio episodes spread out over a long-running series, but is all too noticeable when compiled and pu

    (Note: I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley)

    Aaron Mahnke's third book takes its readers on a journey to an array of places that have all been permanently marked by their respective dark pasts.

    That this work (like the others) is a "best of" collection from his podcast becomes overly clear early on with a definite repetitiveness in the first few sections that isn't noticeable when they're audio episodes spread out over a long-running series, but is all too noticeable when compiled and put one-after-the-other in the typed word. A little bit of editing here would have gone a long way, because "Dreadful Places" ended up dragging at the start.

    Thankfully the book does eventually recover as it draws one in on a fascinating and far-ranging tour. The mix of locations that Mahnke covers ranges from the expected, like the Winchester House or the Tower of London, to lesser-known spots whose history's are no less unsettlingly stained, such as Clipperton Island or Smalls Lighthouse. Unless one has studiously gone through the entire Lore podcast, it will probably be difficult to come away from this book without learning about at least several new disturbing places that they'll feel compelled to discover a little more about on their own. I personally discovered and had my interest sparked for a few spots right in my own home state that I had never heard of until now (something that honestly still amazes me as I write this - Connecticut is quite a small place, to put it kindly).

    This is a morbidly engrossing read that will be quick to get through, and will in turn be quick to spark your curiosity, your imagination, and will also be quick to make the hairs on the back of your neck stand straight as steel rods.

  • Amanda

    Being a fan of the podcast Lore, I decided to give one of the books a try. That turned out to be a double-edged sword as the book consists of transcripts of episodes that I've already heard before. Not necessarily a bad thing; just not what I was expecting. It did make for some great, spooky bedtime reading, though! I would recommend it if you wanted to dip your toe into the world of Lore or if you were looking for a portable version of the podcast.

    I received a digital ARC from the publisher vi

    Being a fan of the podcast Lore, I decided to give one of the books a try. That turned out to be a double-edged sword as the book consists of transcripts of episodes that I've already heard before. Not necessarily a bad thing; just not what I was expecting. It did make for some great, spooky bedtime reading, though! I would recommend it if you wanted to dip your toe into the world of Lore or if you were looking for a portable version of the podcast.

    I received a digital ARC from the publisher via Netgalley.

  • Sesana

    Pretty much exactly like the previous Lore books, with all the strengths and weaknesses that implies. I like when Mahnke does put in the extra work of questioning the folklore, and I'm happiest when it's treated as exactly that and not true events. But he sometimes forgets to do that, even when it would be really easy. If Sarah Winchester never spoke about her belief that ghosts were haunting her and she needed to build constantly to fool them, how do we know that was what she actually believed?

    Pretty much exactly like the previous Lore books, with all the strengths and weaknesses that implies. I like when Mahnke does put in the extra work of questioning the folklore, and I'm happiest when it's treated as exactly that and not true events. But he sometimes forgets to do that, even when it would be really easy. If Sarah Winchester never spoke about her belief that ghosts were haunting her and she needed to build constantly to fool them, how do we know that was what she actually believed? Maybe she had more in common with Alex Jordan (of The House on the Rock fame) than the Fox sisters.

  • Ashleigh

    is the 3rd book in a companion series of books to the podcast, Lore. This book explores cities, towns, states, hotels, buildings, etc where 'dreadful' things have happened or occur. For example, we have hotels haunted by past residents, and towns cursed to fall.

    So this is the first Lore book I've picked up, (and I've never actually listened to the podcast), but it was a fun read. I loved the little snippets about the various places in this book, and it would

    is the 3rd book in a companion series of books to the podcast, Lore. This book explores cities, towns, states, hotels, buildings, etc where 'dreadful' things have happened or occur. For example, we have hotels haunted by past residents, and towns cursed to fall.

    So this is the first Lore book I've picked up, (and I've never actually listened to the podcast), but it was a fun read. I loved the little snippets about the various places in this book, and it would definitely be a great book for horror fans to flick through every now and then, or as a spooky read this October. The illustrations in my e-arc were cute and I imagine they look even better in the finished copy. I didn't have any issues with the book so to speak, but I think if I had been a fan of the original podcast, I might have enjoyed this a bit more.

  • Out of the Bex

    Not quite as good as the previous two...

    Admittedly, I've never listened to the Lore Podcast. But I have read all three books!

    The third installment lacked fluidity, the stories flitted about briefly and quickly dissolved into the next chapter perhaps too quickly after their climax. It did even out after around 100 pages, but though less so, it was still noticeable.

    Also of note, this book is filled with a great deal of history notes and descriptions, much more so than books one and two.

    All in al

    Not quite as good as the previous two...

    Admittedly, I've never listened to the Lore Podcast. But I have read all three books!

    The third installment lacked fluidity, the stories flitted about briefly and quickly dissolved into the next chapter perhaps too quickly after their climax. It did even out after around 100 pages, but though less so, it was still noticeable.

    Also of note, this book is filled with a great deal of history notes and descriptions, much more so than books one and two.

    All in all it was an enjoyable enough read for Halloween.

    VERDICT:

    Borrow it

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