The World of Lore: Dreadful Places

The World of Lore: Dreadful Places

Captivating stories of the places where human evil has left a nefarious mark, featuring stories from the podcast Lore--now a streaming television series--including "Echoes," "Withering Heights," and "Behind Closed Doors" as well as rare material.Sometimes you walk into a room, a building, or even a town, and you feel it. Something seems off--an atmosphere that leaves you o...

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Title:The World of Lore: Dreadful Places
Author:Aaron Mahnke
Rating:

The World of Lore: Dreadful Places Reviews

  • Jessica

    Thanks to Del Rey for the free copy in exchange for my honest review.

    Since picking up Slenderman recently, I have been absolutely fascinated with folklore, specifically the new generation of digital folklore. However, it was nice going back to the folklore that brought us the monsters and places that we would scary each other with in campfire stories.

    Both of these editions in The World of Lore series were very engrossing to read. For Dreadful Places we are brought all over the world to examine

    Thanks to Del Rey for the free copy in exchange for my honest review.

    Since picking up Slenderman recently, I have been absolutely fascinated with folklore, specifically the new generation of digital folklore. However, it was nice going back to the folklore that brought us the monsters and places that we would scary each other with in campfire stories.

    Both of these editions in The World of Lore series were very engrossing to read. For Dreadful Places we are brought all over the world to examine different stories involving New Orleans, ghost ships, the American colonies, and even out to Scotland. These are broken up into smaller sections for each location – so the readers get a good introduction and brief history on all of them. Of course with any kind of book like this there will be some stories that hold the interest of readers more than others, so the short sections make it easy to fly through them.

    I think the creepiest ones for me were the ones in New Orleans. I’ve visited family there many times and had no idea. I will definitely be thinking of these the next time I’m in the area. Mahnke does an incredible job setting the scene with some spine chilling tales.

    After reading Dreadful Places I picked up Monstrous Creatures (which had been hanging out on my shelves for awhile). This one I was really excited for because the folklore surrounding the monsters we grew up hearing about is something I didn’t know much about. Vampires, ghosts, dolls, and more are covered in this book. Each has a detailed background and some were more unsettling than others.

    Overall, if you’re looking for something that reads like fiction then this might be on the dry side for you. From what I’ve heard, if you’ve been an avid listener of the podcast some of these stories are recycled from there. As someone that hasn’t listened to the Lore podcast, these were all new to me! I may have to start listening to some of the podcast – I’ve never really been a podcast listener. With the layout of these stories it is incredibly easy to pick this one up and put it down without getting lost. I would highly recommend this to anyone that is curious about the topic of folklore.

  • Christine Staszko

    I had wanted to get in on these Podcasts, the TV show, or the books, one or the other or all of the above. Ever since I saw the cover of the books and heard the premise it seemed right up my supernaturally obsessed alley. The logical place to start was with this book focusing on “dreadful places” because I’m always looking for new places to add to my haunted places bucket list.

    I really loved the quality and quantity of places the author presents in this book. I’m always worried because of my pre

    I had wanted to get in on these Podcasts, the TV show, or the books, one or the other or all of the above. Ever since I saw the cover of the books and heard the premise it seemed right up my supernaturally obsessed alley. The logical place to start was with this book focusing on “dreadful places” because I’m always looking for new places to add to my haunted places bucket list.

    I really loved the quality and quantity of places the author presents in this book. I’m always worried because of my previously mentioned obsession with the paranormal that these kind of books will just be a retread down roads I’ve already researched. However, I’d say 80% of the places mentioned I was totally ignorant of. And as far as the places I was familiar with or had visited before, the author was able to present me with new content I had never heard of before. A great example of this was the chapter on the Winchester Mystery House. I own the Helen Mirren film, I got to see pieces of the movie set and costumes from the film in person, and I’ve toured the actual property 3 times since it’s right in my backyard (not without picking up a ghost story of my own I might mention). This book had the best compilation of stories about Sarah Winchester and her mansion that I’ve read anywhere, and that’s saying a lot considering how little that can be found on the subject. Even for someone pretty knowledgeable, Mahnke managed to give me a fresh spin on the tale.

    The downfall of this book is a common one for books in this category. You’re going to have stories that grip you and others that are just meh. This is especially true based on what really creeps you out because those are going to be the tales that send shivers up your spine. For me, tales of the demonic or mysterious disappearances keep me awake at night, but things like haunted battle fields or cemeteries are a bit too cliché to get me truly terrified. Luckily no chapter is too long so anything that doesn’t catch your interest will be over before you know it. The knitty gritty with this book is, some stories are light on truth or concrete evidence, and others might not entertain you as much as others.

    I think I’ll eventually read the other two books in this series. While I won’t be rushing out to get them, at least I know I can expect a ton of stories and that a lot of it will probably not be anything I’ve already read about. I also love the light mix of whimsically dark illustrations accompanied with the text that remind me of the scary story books I used to pick up as a kid at my elementary school book fair. While not outright frightening, the tales in this book will definitely make you scratch your head and question the truth about these “dreadful places.”

  • Sara

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    The latest instalment in the ‘Lore’ series, this follows the stories that surround the dark and sinister places in our lore. As usual it’s easy to read, with a friendly and familiar writing style that lends itself well to these types of stories. It’s as though the writer is talking around a camping fire with old friends, relaying spooky stories - which is exactly how these tales should be told.

    The stories and places covered range

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    The latest instalment in the ‘Lore’ series, this follows the stories that surround the dark and sinister places in our lore. As usual it’s easy to read, with a friendly and familiar writing style that lends itself well to these types of stories. It’s as though the writer is talking around a camping fire with old friends, relaying spooky stories - which is exactly how these tales should be told.

    The stories and places covered range from New Orleans, Scottish castles, the American colonies and ghost ships and it’s very good at dipping the readers toe into this range of stories and folklore that can then be followed up in greater depth by the reader if they want to. It never lingers too long on one story or subject, offering an introduction and background to the tale and a brief outline before moving on. This meant that if one story didn’t intrigue me, I was quickly swept up into the next one, and the next. I was particularly taken with the sections on New Orleans and ghost ships. These areas were deeply atmospheric and creepy, with unexplained tales that were genuinely chilling.

    The first section is very ‘America’ centric, and I was a little less interested in these stories because of their lack of richness and history. America itself is a relatively new country in my eyes, and somewhat lacks the magical and ethereal elements that more ancient cultures have in abundance. I also found it was quite flippant at times in its portrayal of slavery and the associated atrocities.

    However, the later chapters do branch out into the wider world and this is where the book came into its own as it allowed for a broader scope in stories. Folklore is so fascinating, and so unique to each culture and local area that I felt it was necessary to do this. It’s an organic thing, that evolves and changes with the people, as well as helping to join a community together through socialisation and the author does well to get this across here. It’s evident he has a passion for the subject, and a need to spread these stories like our ancestors did. It’s a way of keeping the tales alive.

    Another great addition to the ‘Lorek series. I really enjoy these books, and this is perfect to read at this time of year for a creepy little night in.

  • Stephanie Griffin

    The audiobook version of The World of Lore: Dreadful Places is written and read by Aaron Mahnke. It’s based on a podcast that I know next to nothing about. Although I currently subscribe to 48 podcasts, this one never interested me.

    Then, the good people at Lore decided to put into book format a series of books on the different subjects they cover. Dreadful places?! I’m in!

    There are so many great stories in here. Very few had I already heard of. Some of them were so spooky I jumped when someone t

    The audiobook version of The World of Lore: Dreadful Places is written and read by Aaron Mahnke. It’s based on a podcast that I know next to nothing about. Although I currently subscribe to 48 podcasts, this one never interested me.

    Then, the good people at Lore decided to put into book format a series of books on the different subjects they cover. Dreadful places?! I’m in!

    There are so many great stories in here. Very few had I already heard of. Some of them were so spooky I jumped when someone tried to get my attention while I was listening!

    Mahnke lets the reader know when there is no evidence to back up some of the tales he tells. A small amount of them are pretty outrageous. Then there are some stories that might convince you that ghosts are real and that hauntings exist!

    The only disappointing thing I found was the lack of emotion in the reader’s voice for most of the book. Maybe this was on purpose in order to leave it up to the reader to decide if each story is real? Still, I was entertained by the stories themselves.

    I had a lot of fun listening to this book. In fact, I think I might get a print copy for my personal library! I’d recommend Dreadful Places to everyone who likes good ghost stories.

  • Ashleigh

    is the 3rd book in a companion series of books to the podcast, Lore. This book explores cities, towns, states, hotels, buildings, etc where 'dreadful' things have happened or occur. For example, we have hotels haunted by past residents, and towns cursed to fall.

    So this is the first Lore book I've picked up, (and I've never actually listened to the podcast), but it was a fun read. I loved the little snippets about the various places in this book, and it would

    is the 3rd book in a companion series of books to the podcast, Lore. This book explores cities, towns, states, hotels, buildings, etc where 'dreadful' things have happened or occur. For example, we have hotels haunted by past residents, and towns cursed to fall.

    So this is the first Lore book I've picked up, (and I've never actually listened to the podcast), but it was a fun read. I loved the little snippets about the various places in this book, and it would definitely be a great book for horror fans to flick through every now and then, or as a spooky read this October. The illustrations in my e-arc were cute and I imagine they look even better in the finished copy. I didn't have any issues with the book so to speak, but I think if I had been a fan of the original podcast, I might have enjoyed this a bit more.

  • Out of the Bex

    Not quite as good as the previous two...

    Admittedly, I've never listened to the Lore Podcast. But I have read all three books!

    The third installment lacked fluidity, the stories flitted about briefly and quickly dissolved into the next chapter perhaps too quickly after their climax. It did even out after around 100 pages, but though less so, it was still noticeable.

    Also of note, this book is filled with a great deal of history notes and descriptions, much more so than books one and two.

    All in al

    Not quite as good as the previous two...

    Admittedly, I've never listened to the Lore Podcast. But I have read all three books!

    The third installment lacked fluidity, the stories flitted about briefly and quickly dissolved into the next chapter perhaps too quickly after their climax. It did even out after around 100 pages, but though less so, it was still noticeable.

    Also of note, this book is filled with a great deal of history notes and descriptions, much more so than books one and two.

    All in all it was an enjoyable enough read for Halloween.

    VERDICT:

    Borrow it

  • Katherine

    Puckwedgies rise again because he made an appearance here. I can't seem to get away from them, can I?

    I'll always love anything and everything Lore, but for some reason, this one didn't grab my attention as much as the first book did (or as much as I think the third one will). I guess I'm not as fascinated with haunted places and cities as I am with creatures and people. Nonetheless, Aaron Mahnke delivered more ta

    Puckwedgies rise again because he made an appearance here. I can't seem to get away from them, can I?

    I'll always love anything and everything Lore, but for some reason, this one didn't grab my attention as much as the first book did (or as much as I think the third one will). I guess I'm not as fascinated with haunted places and cities as I am with creatures and people. Nonetheless, Aaron Mahnke delivered more tales of the supernatural, and begs the question: What are monsters really made of?

  • Matt

    So disclosure: I have yet to find a podcast that doesn't annoy me. I just don't like most people's voices. So I've never listened to Lore, nor will I likely ever.

    Here's how this went: I started reading, realized this guy's writing voice sounds exactly like a bad podcast voice, and just couldn't do it. I made myself struggle through about 15 pages before I reminded myself, hey, life is short, and I don't have to read anything I don't want to.

    [1 star for the premise. I think it could have been dec

    So disclosure: I have yet to find a podcast that doesn't annoy me. I just don't like most people's voices. So I've never listened to Lore, nor will I likely ever.

    Here's how this went: I started reading, realized this guy's writing voice sounds exactly like a bad podcast voice, and just couldn't do it. I made myself struggle through about 15 pages before I reminded myself, hey, life is short, and I don't have to read anything I don't want to.

    [1 star for the premise. I think it could have been decent had it been done by someone else or better edited.]

  • Kerri Anne

    I admittedly picked this book up from our local library because I thought the cover art was fantastic (and it is), not because I'd ever listened to the podcast on which this book is based (Lore). And while certain stories were new to me and definitely piqued my interest, this book felt like an uncomfortable regurgitation of podcast content.

    I can forgive repetitive content when it's well-written, but this just wasn't. And I'm not saying that to be snarky or unfairly judgmental. Bad writing is ba

    I admittedly picked this book up from our local library because I thought the cover art was fantastic (and it is), not because I'd ever listened to the podcast on which this book is based (Lore). And while certain stories were new to me and definitely piqued my interest, this book felt like an uncomfortable regurgitation of podcast content.

    I can forgive repetitive content when it's well-written, but this just wasn't. And I'm not saying that to be snarky or unfairly judgmental. Bad writing is bad writing, and this was not only terribly written (replete with ill-timed and clunky attempts at humor, including a clichéd and strangely placed "dying to get in there" cemetery joke), it was terribly organized and sloppily edited, too. I kept reading because (I'm an eternal optimist, and really did believe it would get better, yes, and), like aforementioned, some of the stories themselves are just bizarre/horrifying/unexplained enough to be interesting.

    If you're into dark places and why they feel dark (anyone who has ever stepped foot in New Orleans knows what I'm talking about), you might find parts of this book as interesting as I did. But more than reading every page, I'd recommend using that time to find more research and better books on the strange places made strange by horrible human behavior.

    (Speaking of strange, I find it odd that a book about eerie and haunted places, especially with so many chapters centered on unexplained/unsolved mysteries, doesn't include any mention of the lost colony of Roanoke.)

    [One star for the cover art and internal illustrations.]

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