Untrue: Why Nearly Everything We Believe About Women, Lust, and Infidelity Is Wrong and How the New Science Can Set Us Free

Untrue: Why Nearly Everything We Believe About Women, Lust, and Infidelity Is Wrong and How the New Science Can Set Us Free

From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Primates of Park Avenue, a bold, timely reconsideration of female infidelity that will upend everything you thought you knew about women and sex.What do straight, married female revelers at an all-women's sex club in LA have in common with nomadic pastoralists in Namibia who bear children by men not their husbands? Like wome...

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Title:Untrue: Why Nearly Everything We Believe About Women, Lust, and Infidelity Is Wrong and How the New Science Can Set Us Free
Author:Wednesday Martin
Rating:

Untrue: Why Nearly Everything We Believe About Women, Lust, and Infidelity Is Wrong and How the New Science Can Set Us Free Reviews

  • Verne Curley

    Great book

  • Simone Collins

    What a thoroughly enjoyable read! As having basically zero sex drive myself (let's be honest with ourselves: humans are repulsive), I blithely accepted the conventional wisdom that women had lower sex drives, cheated less, and were tempted to cheat less.

    Few things are more refreshing than books that help to change one's paradigm. Untrue was definitely one of these books for me. I thoroughly enjoyed Wednesday's multifaceted exploration of female infidelity, explored through different social scien

    What a thoroughly enjoyable read! As having basically zero sex drive myself (let's be honest with ourselves: humans are repulsive), I blithely accepted the conventional wisdom that women had lower sex drives, cheated less, and were tempted to cheat less.

    Few things are more refreshing than books that help to change one's paradigm. Untrue was definitely one of these books for me. I thoroughly enjoyed Wednesday's multifaceted exploration of female infidelity, explored through different social scientists', psychologists', and primatologists' opinions, as well as various subcultures, groups, one-on-one interviews, and personal anecdotes.

    Wednesday Martin has a knack for presenting concepts in a very engaging, relatable manner (as opposed to a purely academic or purely anecdotal fashion). I LOVE her books. Can't wait to see what she writes next.

  • Jocelyn Rivard

    This book won't be for everybody. And I'll admit that my attention wandered a bit in chapters dealing with research into primates, etc. But the anecdotal sections and the historic detail of how monogamy became a thing were truly fascinating.

  • Cristine Mermaid

    Enlightening book about the myths surrounding women's sexuality. It contains heaps of research breaking myths such as "women are biologically wired for monogamy", "women need to be 'in love' to enjoy sex and can't have sex without falling in love", "women have low sex drives", "straight women can't be attracted to other women" etc etc.

    The research and science behind the studies along with their conclusions is downright fascinating although it did go a bit too long about primate sexual behavior

    Enlightening book about the myths surrounding women's sexuality. It contains heaps of research breaking myths such as "women are biologically wired for monogamy", "women need to be 'in love' to enjoy sex and can't have sex without falling in love", "women have low sex drives", "straight women can't be attracted to other women" etc etc.

    The research and science behind the studies along with their conclusions is downright fascinating although it did go a bit too long about primate sexual behavior for me. The anecdotes and women's stories were diverse and interesting and added a personal touch to what otherwise might be a slighly dry text book tone.

    I have read similar books before so I knew of the views on how women weren't seen as men's property until the agricultural age when men wanted to be sure that they were leaving the land they owned to their genetic offspring but this went a great deal more in depth. It also thoroughly explained the cultural/societal expectations and teachings that insisted women were a certain way and how they were punished when they dared to break out of those narrow restraints.

    I read other reviews and just as the book discussed, this made a lot of people angry. Why? For those who were insisting that they are naturally geared toward monogamy, the book wasn't saying that you weren't. It was about women as a whole, of course individuals vary. It also wasn't saying that people couldn't choose to be monogamous. However, it made the point that there is a wide spectrum and that lifelong strict monogamy could be challenging for many and that there are other options.

    It also discussed other arrangements such as open relationships, polyamory etc and how these types of relationships are a much better fit for so many people and even though they still seem to anger a lot of traditionalists ( why? no one is trying to force it upon you, it doesn't affect you), they are becoming more and more common.

  • Mark Grether

    Yes, come for the salaciousness but stay for the lesson.

    Eye opening in a number of ways, but what stands out is how still deeply maintained in our politics, and US culture, is the ongoing subjugation of women and a demonstration how much farther we have to go. Martin, as well as Christopher Ryan Ph.D and others, have highlighted that shifting to agriculture from hunter-gatherer took us from more equal roles by placing exclusive value on brute-force farming and encouraging control: separating wom

    Yes, come for the salaciousness but stay for the lesson.

    Eye opening in a number of ways, but what stands out is how still deeply maintained in our politics, and US culture, is the ongoing subjugation of women and a demonstration how much farther we have to go. Martin, as well as Christopher Ryan Ph.D and others, have highlighted that shifting to agriculture from hunter-gatherer took us from more equal roles by placing exclusive value on brute-force farming and encouraging control: separating women allowed the isolation and marginalization of their contribution and denial of full participation.

    Women and people in general do not have easy or a simple range of behaviors, and this book helps to rip more stereotypes apart and throw out more assumptions.

  • Cait

    So. I'm really into the use of ethnography and participant-observation as a way to examine mainstream, western culture. That being said, I needed this to either be less anthropological or more. It might be the penalty of knowing too much, but I had a lot of questions about the ethics here & the tone at times was not great

  • Morgan Destera

    I can't say I am a fan of her writing style. It seems many of her sentences run on and get somewhat confusin - One thing I am not pleased with is the author's tendency to describe the people she is interviewing. Tall, blonde, willowy, beautiful, young, what color lipstick, etc. Everyone seems to fit into the mold of the “perfect woman”. Where are the short, heavier ladies? Where are the non-binary (noted but never described)? - She cites a lot of other peoples' reseach but seems to only conduct

    I can't say I am a fan of her writing style. It seems many of her sentences run on and get somewhat confusin - One thing I am not pleased with is the author's tendency to describe the people she is interviewing. Tall, blonde, willowy, beautiful, young, what color lipstick, etc. Everyone seems to fit into the mold of the “perfect woman”. Where are the short, heavier ladies? Where are the non-binary (noted but never described)? - She cites a lot of other peoples' reseach but seems to only conduct her own experiments in certain situations - which seem to be high-end Skirt Parties or conventions/seminars where she might be surrounded by higher societal professionals. Did she do any bonobo research? Even to spend a few days watching the primates in the zoo? Did she travel or even try to communicate with women of the Himba tribe?

    Also it kind of bothered me that she needed/got her husband's “permission” to “fool around” at these Skirt Parties (which she couldn't bring herself to do). I'm not saying as a researcher she should have joined in (I doubt I could have joined in), but her husband shouldn't have needed to give permission when he knew what she was writing about.

    Maybe I am thinking she should have done a little more than watch.. This kind of skews the results for me knowing she did not give much hands-on approaches in any sense

  • Scribe Publications
  • Scribe Publications

    Untrue

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