You Don't Know Everything, Jilly P!

You Don't Know Everything, Jilly P!

Jilly thinks she's figured out how life works. But when her sister Emma is born Deaf, she realizes how much she still has to learn. A big fantasy reader, Jilly connects with another fan, Derek, who is a Deaf Black ASL user. She goes to Derek for advice but doesn't always know the best way to ask for it and makes some mistakes along the way. Jilly has to step back to learn...

DownloadRead Online
Title:You Don't Know Everything, Jilly P!
Author:Alex Gino
Rating:
Edition Language:English

You Don't Know Everything, Jilly P! Reviews

  • Andrew

    I devoured Jilly P in just a few hours, and I think that this book is going to be another game changer in middle grade literature. Jilly, white and hearing, looks in from the outside at both the big and small ways that Deaf people are discriminated against after her family discovers her newborn sister is Deaf, as well as the discrimination of black people, like her Aunt Alicia and her cousins. Her online friend is both Deaf and black. Between all these people, Jilly's world opens up wide. She is

    I devoured Jilly P in just a few hours, and I think that this book is going to be another game changer in middle grade literature. Jilly, white and hearing, looks in from the outside at both the big and small ways that Deaf people are discriminated against after her family discovers her newborn sister is Deaf, as well as the discrimination of black people, like her Aunt Alicia and her cousins. Her online friend is both Deaf and black. Between all these people, Jilly's world opens up wide. She is determined to learn from her mistakes as she tries to understand, and stand up to life's bullies, even the adults she holds dear. Heavy at times, but full of love, learning, and acceptance. Much like Gino's last novel, George, this is another essential and current book that readers of today, at any age, need to have on their list.

  • Ann

    (I read this ARC in exchange for an honest review. I discuss the content of the book, so my review contains spoilers.)

    As a writer, Alex Gino doesn’t know how to play it safe. In their debut middle grade (MG) novel, George, the protagonist is a transgender girl who wants to be Charlotte in a play of Charlotte’s Web, so everyone can see who she is, once and for all. The book, which has reached so many young readers, continues to be a lightning rod for queer oppression and censorship.

    (I read this ARC in exchange for an honest review. I discuss the content of the book, so my review contains spoilers.)

    As a writer, Alex Gino doesn’t know how to play it safe. In their debut middle grade (MG) novel, George, the protagonist is a transgender girl who wants to be Charlotte in a play of Charlotte’s Web, so everyone can see who she is, once and for all. The book, which has reached so many young readers, continues to be a lightning rod for queer oppression and censorship.

    In a recent presentation to the Association of Children’s Librarians, Gino stated (I’m using auto-captions): “That’s why I write for the future. That’s why I write kids’ books, so the next generation of people have more of a range of seeing what’s in the world.”

    Flash forward to this month: May 2018. During Deaf Awareness Week, I have twice read the ARC of Gino’s new MG novel, to be released in September. It is titled You Don’t Know Everything, Jilly P! And it’s marvelous. It is brilliant and funny and topical and timeless—and not safe.

    From the first page of chapter one, we are introduced to Jilly’s life and the themes that will weave together masterfully throughout the book. Jilly and her family are white and hearing. Jilly’s mom (or J.M., in the book’s ‘initialisms’) is pregnant with a second daughter. Jilly and her parents are in their living room watching TV, when the news come on that a fifteen-year-old Black girl has been fatally shot by the police following an undescribed ‘incident.’

    “Again?” Dad says. “This world gets scarier and scarier.”

    “No kidding,” says Mom.

    “Dad shuts off the TV and turns to me, wiping the concern from his face as quickly as the image on the screen disappears. As if it didn’t happen if we don’t mention it.”

    Jilly goes up her bedroom and logs into a fan site for her favorite fantasy book series, the Magically Mysterious Vidalia trilogy. Jilly and the other under-14 fans engage in text-like fandom specific banter. But life often leaks in. Especially in the form of profoundinoaktown, who does not wipe away the fact that he is Black and Deaf. He’s forthright and nervy; and Jilly thinks she may have a crush on him.

    When J.M gives birth to baby Emma it becomes quickly apparent that child is at the very least hard of hearing. J.M and J.D. are sullen for a period as they retest the baby and seek professional help. As Jilly’s best friend Macy explains to her, “I mean, they were expecting to have another kid who can hear and everything, and now they have to get used to the idea that they don’t.”

    This notion of parents ‘mourning the death of a perfect child’ when they have a Deaf or disabled child is not one I’m fond of, but many people will identify with it and it may help children understand their parents’ behavior in such circumstances. Especially if the period is temporary, as it is with Jilly’s parents.

    I’m more sympathetic to J.M. and J.D. when they consult with Emma’s first audiologist, the appropriately named Dr. Slapp. Dr. Slapp immediately talks hearing aids and getting Emma back on a “normal” track. She introduces the notion of surgery for a cochlear implant (CI) in their first meeting. She is oralism focused. Dr. Slapp discourages Emma’s family from learning American Sign Language. “Unless and until a family decides to go down the road of manual communication, it’s best to focus the child’s attention on spoken language.”

    None of this is exaggerated. It’s kind of thing that can confuse hearing parents of deaf kids who are not yet aware of their options and trying to do the best for their child. In my experience, audiologists like Dr. Slapp are persuasive and absolute. Gino shows this well. In doing so, they place themselves firmly on the side of Deaf community. That is, people (like me) who identify as culturally Deaf and speak ASL. There are so few MG and YA books that do this, it was stunning and affirming for me to read. I can’t wait to get this book into the hands of the Deaf kids I work with; and the hearing kids too.

    Jilly finds respite from her parents’ worries at her aunts’ house. Jilly’s Aunt Joanne is married to her Aunt Alicia, who “is Black, with dozens of straight, long locks running down her back.” She is real with Jilly in a way that her parents are not. Aunt Alicia has a young son and daughter from a previous marriage, and, like all Black mothers of Black children, she watches the daily news reports of Black adults and children being killed by law enforcement with intense pain and fear.

    We aren’t far into the book when we discover that Jilly really doesn’t know *everything*. She has never confronted her white privilege. When Jilly suggests to her Aunt Alicia that “things will be different” when her two cousins grow up, Aunt Alicia doesn’t pull any punches: “That’s a really sweet thought, Jellybean. But we’ve got a long way to go between here and there.”

    Aunt Alicia tells Jilly to discuss the latest shooting of a young Black man with her family that night. Their responses are uncomfortable and evasive. She also makes missteps online with profound. He is uncomfortable and embarrassed when she excitedly tells him her sister is Deaf in front their Vidalia group.

    Moving along to a Thanksgiving dinner from hell, which families are certainly experiencing in Trump’s America. Aunt Alicia is confronted with both outspoken racism and microaggressions (“Will you bake us sweet potato pie?”) from her wife’s family. Aunt Alicia rightly storms out. This is a catalyst for Jilly to begin to confront her own privilege and the prejudice of her comfortable white family and community. “If [cousins] Justin and Jamila aren’t safe because they’re Black, does that mean Emma and I are safe because we’re white? I feel weird even thinking that.”

    Further conversations and confrontations with Aunt Alicia and profound aka Derek grow her mind. By the end of the book, Jilly suggests that her family place a BLACK LIVES MATTER sign on their lawn. “A sign doesn’t save anyone’s life, but it let’s people know we’re thinking about it and that they can too."

    I’ll pause here to say that there will certainly be people who find this book didactic. Some critics and parents will find this an ‘indoctrination’ of a different kind than George, but equally offensive. But these are crucial issues in children’s day to day lives and there’s no reason they shouldn’t appear in kid lit fiction. In fact, there’s every reason they should. And it needs to happen before YA; kids can't wait that long to see themselves in books.

    In their excellent back matter, Gino is aware that they have written a book to educate young white readers about their privilege. They write, “especially to Black Deaf readers”: “I hope that you will forgive me for killing two Black youth on the page, and injuring another, for the edification of my white main character. I hope that my choices are worthy of forgiveness.”

    This is an amazing author’s statement. I cannot speak for hearing Black or Black Deaf readers. But, as a white Deaf reader, I believe that the reader’s trust Gino gained in their more linear first novel will be sustained by many who pick up this multilayered book.

    How is Gino on ASL and deafness? That’s something I can speak to. I’m going to bullet point a few things.

    -Derek’s 1st language is ASL. It is not uncommon for someone like us to mix up English spelling and grammar. Gino demonstrates this but doesn’t labor over it in a way that would make the Deaf seem illiterate.

    -I held my breath during the discussions about name signs. This is a highly important tradition in Deaf culture, and Gino honors it. When Jilly creates a name sign for Emma: “profoundinoaktown: you’re not Deaf. JillyP: So? profoundinoaktown: so, name signs come from Deaf people. that’s just how it works. it’s one of the perks.” I hope this will prevent hearing readers from making up their own name signs. Not to mention hearing teachers, who should never assign that as a book-related task.

    Gino knows enough about the playfulness of ASL to know that certain name signs are built-in, so to speak. Like Vidalia=onion.

    -Derek references the history of Deaf oppression; specifically, that ASL has been forbidden to so many. “profoundinoaktown: oralism is back. as if hanging around hearing people is going to make me hearing or something…I mean, it’s not the same as it was…there aren’t asylums or anything anymore…and Deaf people have always found a way to sign with each other.”

    This is Gino’s family history. From the back matter: “My father’s parents were Deaf and my grandfather co-founded the Staten Island Deaf Club. I spent many weekend evenings surrounded by Deaf and HOH folks…the music pumping heavy enough to shake the floor.”

    -Many hearing authors who write Deaf characters are strictly anti-CI. As if they are politically righteous and in-the-know. Gino knows it’s more complicated. It’s helpful for some people and not others. I appreciate that, since the majority of D/deaf/HOH kids and teens I work with have CIs. Many of them (including native signers) use them as tools to acquire language rather than as a cure. Alienating them as readers is cruel and senseless.

    Jilly makes lots of mistakes, big and small. Aunt Alicia tells her: “Jillybean, if I gave up on people when they made mistakes, I’d be lonely. Real lonely.” While this book is a roadmap for kids to understand injustices or “the range of what’s around them in the world,” and strive to get it right. It also recognizes that they’ll make mistakes and hurt people, but that shouldn’t stop them from asking questions and engaging in hard discussions. If that isn’t a hopeful message for young readers, I don’t know what is.

    There is a paucity of Deaf #ownvoices. There were moments while I was reading this book that I despaired. For example, it hurts me that a hearing author is going to be the first writer to explain name signs to hearing readers. For all Gino’s research and sensitivity, there is still a wide space between us. Just like there is a wide space between Jilly and Derek on Maeve Norton’s excellent book cover. A cover that is as plain and identifiable as the one for George.

    Gino’s prose is plain (with some nice flourishes, like the ‘everything’ on the cover) and identifiable too. They are growing as a writer, and that’s always exciting to witness. This isn’t an author who has written a couple of remarkable books and will rest on their laurels. It’s someone who will keep making fearless leaps that earn them loyal readers.

    The Deaf #ownvoices that exist (including me) are largely white women. The need for BIPOC Deaf #ownvoices is intense. This is the first book I know of since Jacqueline Woodson’s Feathers (2007) to feature a significant Black Deaf character. Black ASL and Black Deaf culture are historically and contemporary rich traditions. There are so many stories to be told that will entertain and change people’s perspectives. What are the obstacles unique to Black Deaf writers in English and ASL? How can we help them publish their stories, and gain recognition and have careers? These are questions I keep asking myself. I am also asking publishers and white hearing authors who benefit from telling their stories.

    In the Vidalia community, white hearing Crytaline says: “oh. double whammy…I just mean that’s a lot to deal with. Deaf AND black.” Gino perhaps serves their readers (and characters) best by showing that Derek’s blackness and deafness are indivisible; they make him a whole person. This is what's actually meant by 'intersectionality.'

    I HIGHLY RECOMMEND You Don’t Know Everything, Jilly P!

    *One of Gino’s Black Deaf sensitivity readers, Ayisha Knight-Shaw, demonstrates the name sign she gave Derek.

    Note: Gino uses the verb 'to use' to describe those native and fluent in ASL. I prefer to say I 'speak' ASL, just as I speak English. That may seem contradictory to some, but I feel it creates parity between my two languages.

  • Laura Gardner

    Thanks to @scholasticinc for the free book!

    ~*~*~*~*~*

    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/5 for this thought-provoking MG book by #alexgino

    ~*~*~*~*~*

    Jilly (white, hearing) is introduced to the complexities of the Deaf community, as well as the Black Lives Matter movement in this moving coming of age story by the author of GEORGE.

    ~*~*~*~*~*

    YOU DON’T KNOW EVERYTHING, JILLY P sucked me right in and never let me go.

    Here’s why I loved it: ❤

    ~*~* honest conversations like the ones between Jilly and her Black Aunt Alicia (her Aunt J

    Thanks to @scholasticinc for the free book!

    ~*~*~*~*~*

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 for this thought-provoking MG book by #alexgino

    ~*~*~*~*~*

    Jilly (white, hearing) is introduced to the complexities of the Deaf community, as well as the Black Lives Matter movement in this moving coming of age story by the author of GEORGE.

    ~*~*~*~*~*

    YOU DON’T KNOW EVERYTHING, JILLY P sucked me right in and never let me go.

    Here’s why I loved it: ❤️

    ~*~* honest conversations like the ones between Jilly and her Black Aunt Alicia (her Aunt Joanne’s wife) about racism and how to stand up for others

    ❤️

    ~*~* students will learn a lot about the debate over cochlear implants in the Deaf community—is it a tool or a cure? So fascinating. Jilly’s friend Derek (who is Deaf) schools her...and the reader in Deaf culture and ASL rules. ❤️

    ~*~*the title. It gets right to the heart of things. The realization that you don’t know everything and you’re bound to make mistakes and offend someone is tough, but oh so real. Jilly learns it’s inevitable to make mistakes “the hard thing about accidentally saying the wrong thing is that you don’t know it’s the wrong thing until you already said it and hurt someone. And even if you didn’t mean it that way, you can’t take it back.” 😢

    ❤️

    ~*~*Alex Gino does an excellent job explaining the damage of microaggressions, as well as the responsibility white people have to speak up when they witness those. The afterword is a beautifully written explanation of how Gino came to write this book, including the sensitivity readers he sought out.

  • Beth

    Jillian is experiencing growing pains in the form of life lessons. Her new baby sister was born deaf and she is dealing with some racial tensions in her family as well as in a newly forming friendship.

    While this is a book written for kids, Gino is very open that it "is consciously written for white people as a catalyst to talk about modern racism and police violence in the United States," as they stated in the author's note at the end.

    The part of the book that especially spoke to me was the te

    Jillian is experiencing growing pains in the form of life lessons. Her new baby sister was born deaf and she is dealing with some racial tensions in her family as well as in a newly forming friendship.

    While this is a book written for kids, Gino is very open that it "is consciously written for white people as a catalyst to talk about modern racism and police violence in the United States," as they stated in the author's note at the end.

    The part of the book that especially spoke to me was the tension-filled Thanksgiving dinner where Jilly is saddened to learn that some of her family members are racist. That was such a palpable moment in the story.

    If I had one criticism of the book is that it's as subtle as a sledgehammer in addressing political issues, to the point where it feels a bit didactic in places. But the book has lovable characters and its greatest strength is that it models the necessity for white people to talk about race and in order to do that, we need to get uncomfortable and recognize that we're going to screw up. But doing and saying nothing speaks just as loudly as saying something offensive.

  • Kate Olson

    Thx to @kidlitexchange for this review copy!

    .

    Still struggling with long typing sessions so I’ll sum this one up with a list:

    • incredibly important messages re: inclusion/race/Deaf community/ASL/police brutality/microagressions

    • middle grade with a message for ALL

    • one of my top MG reads of 2018 and one of my very shortlist of top books of Fall 2018. If you read MG, teach MG, parent MG, librarian MG, this book needs to be on your radar.

  • Avery (Book Deviant)

    thank you Miss Print for sending me this ARC in exchange for an honest review!!

    i loved this one as much as i loved GEORGE. alex gino is writing intense and badly needed MG books for the next generation.

    full review to come!!!

  • Brenda Kahn

    This book, Alex Gino's sophomore effort, has a lesson or two to teach and it feels like it, especially at the beginning. That said, they are very important lessons - about white privilege, microaggressions, racism, ableism and assumptions. During the first part of the book, I confess to being annoyed at the overly simplistic way Jilly P. spoke. She does sound younger than the typical seventh-grader. (I'm a middle school librarian) I did flip to the back to read the author's note as I contemplate

    This book, Alex Gino's sophomore effort, has a lesson or two to teach and it feels like it, especially at the beginning. That said, they are very important lessons - about white privilege, microaggressions, racism, ableism and assumptions. During the first part of the book, I confess to being annoyed at the overly simplistic way Jilly P. spoke. She does sound younger than the typical seventh-grader. (I'm a middle school librarian) I did flip to the back to read the author's note as I contemplated setting it aside. I'm glad I did. I returned to the narrative and slowly became immersed in the story. Jilly P. owns her mistakes and bravely confronts the racism that exists in her extended family. She also eventually chides her not-racist parents for not talking about racism. There's warmth and humor to soften the tougher parts of the book. This is a brave, important book that would help adults start conversations with the young people they care about. Thoughtful adults and young people will identify their own privilege and hopefully work to change minds and raise consciousnesses.

  • Samadhi

    This is a great book that I think is best for people in grades 4-8. You don't know everything Jilly P! by Alex Gino is about a girl name Jilly who has a baby sister named Emma who was recently born deaf. She realizes that the world is going to treat Emma different than her and that the world is going to treat her two black cousins (she is Caucasian) different than her. To learn how to deal with it she talks to a boy online who is black and deaf about his experiences and just life. Follow Jilly a

    This is a great book that I think is best for people in grades 4-8. You don't know everything Jilly P! by Alex Gino is about a girl name Jilly who has a baby sister named Emma who was recently born deaf. She realizes that the world is going to treat Emma different than her and that the world is going to treat her two black cousins (she is Caucasian) different than her. To learn how to deal with it she talks to a boy online who is black and deaf about his experiences and just life. Follow Jilly as she navigates everything from racism in her family to innocent people getting shot. The only reason that I gave this book 4 out of 5 stars is that even though Jilly was 12 years old, she kind of sounded like a 5th grader. Overall it was a Great book!!!

  • Suzanne Steckert

    Very ambitious book. Strong representation of deaf community (my daughter is hearing impaired) but missed the mark on the racial issues. Dialogue came off as preachy and disingenuous. It is hard to top George but the lessons are lost in the obvious and predicatable plot.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.