Maeve in America: Essays by a Girl from Somewhere Else

Maeve in America: Essays by a Girl from Somewhere Else

“If Tina Fey and David Sedaris had a daughter, she would be Maeve Higgins.” —Glamour“Maeve Higgins is hilarious, poignant, conversational, and my favorite Irish import since U2. You’re in for a treat.” —Phoebe RobinsonA timely essay collection about life, love, and becoming an American from breakout comedy star and podcaster Maeve HigginsMaeve Higgins was a bestselling mem...

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Title:Maeve in America: Essays by a Girl from Somewhere Else
Author:Maeve Higgins
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Edition Language:English

Maeve in America: Essays by a Girl from Somewhere Else Reviews

  • Donna Hines

    Self care, self love, self appreciation and awareness. Throw in some humor. Throw in some soul searching while on a journey to who knows and well you got this one wrapped.

    I loved everything about this. The writing was simplistic yet packed full of fun, love, excitement.

    A collection of essays much like Coming to America in which this Irish gal is trying to make her way in NYC as a newly planted immigrant.

    It's not all comedy show style though as the discussions center upon some serious aspects inc

    Self care, self love, self appreciation and awareness. Throw in some humor. Throw in some soul searching while on a journey to who knows and well you got this one wrapped.

    I loved everything about this. The writing was simplistic yet packed full of fun, love, excitement.

    A collection of essays much like Coming to America in which this Irish gal is trying to make her way in NYC as a newly planted immigrant.

    It's not all comedy show style though as the discussions center upon some serious aspects including Dreamers, Immigration Issues, reaching adulthood, leaving home, and of course finding your place in life.

    Even the internet can be found to have some healing properties and advice much like that which is received from family and friends.

    This was like a warm cup of tea on a cold winter's night.

    Maeve Higgins is a newcomer to me, but I'll be sure to keep and eye out for her next work.

    Thank you to Maeve , her publisher, and Goodreads for this ARC giveaway in exchange for this honest review. This books is one of many I will be donating to Hoyt Library in memory of my niece Cassie Ann Gatcha.

  • Terzah

    I don't relate to a lot in the collections of women's essays the publishing industry churns out these days--they are all too slang-y, too victim-y, too New Age-y, too bitter, too stupid or all of the above--but I loved this one. The author, an Irish comedian and podcaster who now lives in New York, does write about some of the same topics (body image, dating, and family among them) as other essayists, but her take on these topics is funny, original and intelligent. Of the constant battle she fig

    I don't relate to a lot in the collections of women's essays the publishing industry churns out these days--they are all too slang-y, too victim-y, too New Age-y, too bitter, too stupid or all of the above--but I loved this one. The author, an Irish comedian and podcaster who now lives in New York, does write about some of the same topics (body image, dating, and family among them) as other essayists, but her take on these topics is funny, original and intelligent. Of the constant battle she fights over accepting the way she looks, she says, "...I do sense a truce coming on between my body, myself and my life...I'm Sisyphus in a sun hat, determined to smile." And that's perfect, because most of us, in relation to trying to like our bodies, are Sisyphus; just when we think we've reached the top of that hill, that we no longer care that we don't look like magazine models or Olympic athletes or even like younger versions of ourselves, we catch a glimpse in some cruel mirror of our soft middles or our aging skin...and right back down the slope rolls the rock.

    I also like Maeve Higgins because she's really funny, especially when she's making a particularly astute and witty observation. "Rescue animals are prized possessions in New York, and unexpected status symbols," she writes. "It seems like the older and sicker your animal is, the richer and greater you are...'Oh, that's Melody, she's actually a cat. She has Feline HIV and two types of cancer, plus she's thirty-two years old and has dementia, so you can imagine the amount of meds! Anyway--we had to have three of Melody's legs removed and her remaining one encased in titanium and centered...Her leg cost sixty thousand dollars. Isn't she beautiful?'"

    She's just as good on more serious topics, including immigration, the subject of her podcasts. To really get an objective take on the USA, especially in these fraught and insecure times, you need to turn to an outsider. Actually, maybe this is always true of any country at any time in history: foreign residents have the clearest eye for the truth. Aren't we all still reading Alexis de Tocqueville? It's not clear to me that Higgins plans to be a true immigrant--I don't think she is seeking US citizenship--but her perspective as an Irishwoman in New York and someone who interviews immigrants gives her a particularly keen view on their issues.

    Writing about Annie Moore, another Irishwoman who came from Higgins' hometown and landed at Ellis Island in 1892, she concludes an essay called "Aliens of Extraordinary Ability" with this paragraph: "Annie Moore never made a fortune, or wrote a book, or invented a computer, and why should she? Why should immigrants be deemed extraordinary in order to deserve a place at the table? She did enough. She was just one woman who lived a short life, a hard one. She had eleven children, but only six made it through to adulthood. Can you imagine burying five of your children? I can't. I tuck that part away in the 'she must have been different from me, with fewer feelings' folder, the delusional one that's full of news stories from far-away places that are too terrible to bear. Annie died before she turned fifty, but she lives on in every girl from a country shot through with rebellion and hunger, and in every immigrant who gives America their humanity, as every immigrant does."

    That's the real truth, the way a real truth-teller states it. Her humility on top of her talent makes her a powerful force. I look forward to reading much more of Maeve Higgins.

  • Molly

    I will confess that I had never heard of Maeve Higgins prior to writing this book. I am glad that I gave it a chance, though, because Higgins is hilarious and I'm looking forward to seeking out more of her work in whatever form it might take. She's self-deprecating in a charming way, very Irish, and extremely thoughtful - the essay about her attempts to make her podcast about immigrants into something comedic is frustrating (because you want to throttle her producers) and beautiful all at once.

    I will confess that I had never heard of Maeve Higgins prior to writing this book. I am glad that I gave it a chance, though, because Higgins is hilarious and I'm looking forward to seeking out more of her work in whatever form it might take. She's self-deprecating in a charming way, very Irish, and extremely thoughtful - the essay about her attempts to make her podcast about immigrants into something comedic is frustrating (because you want to throttle her producers) and beautiful all at once. She's not quite David Sedaris, but she's pretty great.

    I received access to this title via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  • Tibbi

    Maeve Higgin's collection of essays initially read like Bridget Jones comes to America, as she offers humorous self-deprecating anecdotes of her own immigration to New York City from Cobh, Ireland. Rent-a-dress, money woes, small talk and swimming and loathing with dolphins, get the Higgins treatment. But as we know, life is not all fun and comedy sketches, and Higgins' pieces on Dreamers, leaving home, mentoring and our place in the universe are thoughtful and poignant.

    I was not familiar with M

    Maeve Higgin's collection of essays initially read like Bridget Jones comes to America, as she offers humorous self-deprecating anecdotes of her own immigration to New York City from Cobh, Ireland. Rent-a-dress, money woes, small talk and swimming and loathing with dolphins, get the Higgins treatment. But as we know, life is not all fun and comedy sketches, and Higgins' pieces on Dreamers, leaving home, mentoring and our place in the universe are thoughtful and poignant.

    I was not familiar with Maeve Higgins prior to reading this book, although she is well known in Ireland. I look forward to reading more of what she has to offer in the future. Thank you to the publisher for an advanced copy of this book.

  • Mandy

    I picked this up while in NYC at the Strand because it was signed and I loved the review "If Tiny Fey and David Sedaris had a daughter..."

    I was belly laughing by page 2, and really enjoyed laughing at the entire thing. Maeve is thoughtful and smart, and observes her experience being Irish in America.

    Everyone needs to laugh. This is a particularly good way to get it done.

  • Douglas Rowe

    I would be delighted to meet Maeve Higgins someday. She has learned some lovely and encouraging lessons about herself, life, love and family that take others much longer into their lives to learn if they ever learn them at all. Her stories are interesting, accessible and delightful with a real positive energy that makes this an uplifting read.

  • Ammar

    3.5 stars

    Thanks for Penguin Canada for an ARC of this book.

    Interesting personal essays

    From an Irish point of view

    An alien in the USA

    Maeve is a comedian

    Those essays take about:

    Her travels

    Her fear of dolphins

    Her Instagram addiction

    Failed love

    Obsession with Michael Fassbender

    Dogs and pets

    Children

    USA and trump

    Complimenting women

    Renting fancy dresses

    Summer in NYC

    Good shit I tell you

  • Maddison

    I was fortunate enough to win this book through a Goodreads Giveaway. My thanks to the sponsor and to Goodreads for facilitating this giveaway.

    The series of essays in "Maeve in America" - penned by Irish comedian Maeve Higgins - was a bit difficult for me to synthesize into one main idea/takeaway. While some of the stories I definitely enjoyed and found humorous, others seemed to build to a crescendo that never materialized. I often found myself asking questions like, "so what?" and "why is this

    I was fortunate enough to win this book through a Goodreads Giveaway. My thanks to the sponsor and to Goodreads for facilitating this giveaway.

    The series of essays in "Maeve in America" - penned by Irish comedian Maeve Higgins - was a bit difficult for me to synthesize into one main idea/takeaway. While some of the stories I definitely enjoyed and found humorous, others seemed to build to a crescendo that never materialized. I often found myself asking questions like, "so what?" and "why is this essay present in a supposedly comedic collection of writings?" The design of the book cover, the nature of the back blurb, and the reputation of its author suggested that each essay would be, more than anything else, funny. However, some stories were very serious, as if they had accidentally dropped out of a political memoir and nestled themselves in between the pages of Higgins' work.

    That being said, I have had no previous experience with Maeve Higgins' writing, podcast, or stand-up comedy, so I dove into this read with few expectations. After finishing the collection, I do think Higgins is funny, but I would have liked to see that humor appear more consistently throughout the essays instead of just in small bits and pieces. If that would have been the case, I doubt I'd be left wondering how to categorize this book.

    While others may or may not share my thoughts, I think most everyone who reads this collection will connect with at least something Higgins shares. For me, her essay mentioning the difficulties of disliking summer hit home, and the way she further tied these slight annoyances into how women and men often ridicule their own bodies during the season was particularly memorable. I only wish that more of her essays would have followed a similar pattern.

  • Kate

    I just couldn't get into these stories. I found a few interesting but some of the others just fell flat for me.

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