A Place for Us

A Place for Us

A Place for Us unfolds the lives of an Indian-American Muslim family, gathered together in their Californian hometown to celebrate the eldest daughter, Hadia's, wedding - a match of love rather than tradition. It is here, on this momentous day, that Amar, the youngest of the siblings, reunites with his family for the first time in three years. Rafiq and Layla must now cont...

DownloadRead Online
Title:A Place for Us
Author:Fatima Farheen Mirza
Rating:
Edition Language:English

A Place for Us Reviews

  • Diane S ☔

    Wow!! I am just blown away by the fact that this is a first novel, the story and theme so universal. A Muslim Indian family in America, trying to maintain it's own beliefs and culture, while facing modernity. This family, mother, father, two daughters , Hadia and Huda, and the youngest, a son Amar who never really feels he belongs. We come to know this family inside and out,the book starts with the marriage of Hadia,and then goes back and forth, to various beginnings and endings. While their bel

    Wow!! I am just blown away by the fact that this is a first novel, the story and theme so universal. A Muslim Indian family in America, trying to maintain it's own beliefs and culture, while facing modernity. This family, mother, father, two daughters , Hadia and Huda, and the youngest, a son Amar who never really feels he belongs. We come to know this family inside and out,the book starts with the marriage of Hadia,and then goes back and forth, to various beginnings and endings. While their beliefs may not be mine, many of the problems between parents and siblings are indeed universal.

    As they struggle to find their place in the larger world, the children also struggle to find their place in the family. Living up to parental expectations, or in Amar's case the struggle to find his place anywhere at all. Trying to carvea path between cultural and religious beliefs and the lessening of this expectation to fit with the place they now find themselves. The story of this family in all its totality is both moving and insightful. The barriers to acceptance by children and parents after 911, when all Muslims were viewed with suspicion and in many cases outright hate. By showing us the commonalities in their family and our own, this young author has shown us that ww may in fact may not be so different.

    The last part of the book focuses on the father's point of view,alone. How he thought, what went wrong and what he wished he had done differently. It is full of anguish and remorse, and we clearly see for the first time what this Muslim, husband, father has gone through, from his own childhood to the way he tried to instill family values and religious beliefs in his children. It does end on a note of positivity, sadness yes, but hopefully as well. This is an outstanding piece of fiction, in my opinion, I quite frankly fell hard for this family, with all it's flaws and things mistakenly done out of love. I wasn't ready to leave them at books end, and I believe if you read, or at least I hope, that you will see some of the same values, if not the religious beliefs, that we try to instill in our own families.

    This is also the first book published under the Sarah Jessica Parker imprint of Random House, and it is a wonderful beginning.

    ARC from bookbrowse and Random House.

  • Angela M

    Every once in a while I read a debut novel that is so perfect because it’s everything I want - beautifully written with characters that have you caring about them from the beginning and a story that will not easily be forgotten. This is one of them. You might read reviews of this book both on Goodreads and in the press and see words like stunning, beautiful, powerful and I wish I could be more original and find some different words but I can only say that this book is all of those things. This i

    Every once in a while I read a debut novel that is so perfect because it’s everything I want - beautifully written with characters that have you caring about them from the beginning and a story that will not easily be forgotten. This is one of them. You might read reviews of this book both on Goodreads and in the press and see words like stunning, beautiful, powerful and I wish I could be more original and find some different words but I can only say that this book is all of those things. This is a story of an Indian Muslim family living in California, and of course, it is in so many ways about cultural traditions, religious beliefs, but at its core it is a story of a family, how much they love each other, how they make mistakes and hurt each other, how deeply they feel sorrow and regret for things they do and say, sometimes too late. They are not unlike many of us, whether we are Indian Muslim or not.

    We know at the beginning that Amar, the youngest child in the family, has been gone for several years and that there is tension between him and his father, Rafiq. As he returns for his sister Hadia’s wedding, his mother Layla and sister Huda as well as Hadia are anxious about how Amar’s return will be. We move back and forth seamlessly through multiple points of view - their thoughts of the present, memories of the past, the good ones like going to see fireworks and then those not so happy, at various times in their lives as little children and teenagers, the emotions, the fear of what it was like for them after 9/11, taking us back and forth finally moving towards where they are today. This is the intimate way we get to know these characters so deeply. The narrative that perhaps struck me the most, the deepest was that of Rafiq, the father who we come to know in the last part of the book. I found some circumstances so heartbreaking and some so uplifting and I cried at both. It’s hard to say anything more than hasn’t been said in the numerous reviews, so I’ll leave it a thanks to my good friend Diane S. whose review made me know I had to read this book.

    I received an advanced copy of this book from SJP for Hogarth/Crown through NetGalley.

  • Susanne Strong

    “A Place For Us” is a novel about a family of five: Rafiq, Layla, Hadia, Huda and Amar, all

    “A Place For Us” is a novel about a family of five: Rafiq, Layla, Hadia, Huda and Amar, all of whom struggle to be true to themselves, while trying to remain faithful to each other, their religion and their traditions as Muslim Americans. Rafiq, runs a tight ship, strictly adhering to the militant upbringing, he himself grew up with. Layla, lives for both her family and her religion, they go hand in hand and she believes in the power of her faith to help guide her through. Her children are her life, though unconsciously she gravitates to one, more than the others. Hadia, the eldest daughter, is the best and the brightest, the one who needs recognition, personally and professionally above all else. She has a need to live by a certain code, regardless of who it impacts. Huda is the quiet one, the most confident, the most self-assured. The one everyone goes to when they need to be consoled. Amar, is the youngest child, the one who struggles the most: within his family unit, with school and with his beliefs. He has always been the outsider. The one thing he wants most in this life is forbidden.

    At the outset of “A Place for Us,” the family comes together to celebrate Hadia’s wedding. Amar returns for the celebration from parts unknown, having been estranged from the family for many years. Everyone walks on eggshells. afraid of each other and most of all, afraid of facing the truth.

    Emotions are palpable, from the very first moment, the tightness in the chest, the sinking, nervous feeling in the stomach. I am there, scared straight, watching, waiting, all eyes on Amar.

    I am Hadia, when she is in competition with Amar and when confronts her Baba (Rafiq) about him; I am Amar, when he dotes on his mother, when he plays with his friend Ali, when he looks longingly at Amira and when he hangs his head in shame. I am also Huda, when she comforts those around her. Whose character resonates most with me you might wonder..gnawing away every fiber of my being? Amar. Always Amar. Thinking of his unrelenting heartache, his unwavering need for acceptance, love and understanding, my chest is tight and my eyes fill with tears.

    When reading this novel, my head swirled with a myriad of thoughts. How do you define “A Place for Us?” Is it culture, family, religion or tradition? It it a “place” for you or a “place” for me? In my opinion, the answer isn’t that simple. It is the “place” where each character feels the most comfortable being the person they are, the “place” they feel the safest and most at ease and for each it is different.

    No one knows how they might impact someone else and yet, in “A Place for Us” each and every character’s life is impacted by another’s actions and decisions. Ways in which you would never imagine. In my mind, this was the take-away - to be accountable for your actions and think about how your choices affect those around you as all actions have consequences, even the trivial ones.

    For the Full Traveling Sister Group Review, please see Brenda and Norma’s blog:

  • Melissa

    It isn’t often that a book manages to tiptoe quietly into my life and steal a piece of my heart as effortlessly as this enthralling beauty. Thought-provoking, insightful and rife with stunning passages,

    is much

    than just a novel to spend a few days with—it's one to appreciate, grow from and reflect back on.

    Within the first few pages it’s clear,

    ’s writing is something special—there's a distinct beauty to her storytelling. From the intriguing opening, to

    It isn’t often that a book manages to tiptoe quietly into my life and steal a piece of my heart as effortlessly as this enthralling beauty. Thought-provoking, insightful and rife with stunning passages,

    is much

    than just a novel to spend a few days with—it's one to appreciate, grow from and reflect back on.

    Within the first few pages it’s clear,

    ’s writing is something special—there's a distinct beauty to her storytelling. From the intriguing opening, to the family dynamics and the myriad of emotions at play, it’s nothing short of impressive. Mirza writes with an honesty and deep understanding of the inner workings of relationships and the turmoil that can plague those connections.

    The story opens with Amar, returning to his family after a three-year estrangement, to partake in his eldest sister, Hadia’s wedding. Amar is the youngest, and only son, in an Indian-American Muslim family of five and he’s always sort of struggled to find his place. Through a series of flashbacks that aren’t quite linear, the author weaves a tale that allows the reader to be an active participant in the lives of the three siblings and their parents—piecing together the timeline like a puzzle, until the full picture of

    starts to take shape.

    In trying to make sense of Amar’s distance, the story explores the inner workings of the family and their struggles with tradition, faith and outside influences. We have the father, Rafiq, who's set in his ways and often portrayed as the enforcer. Then there’s Layla, mama bear, who wavers a time or two in upholding her beliefs in the face of children wanting to branch out and try things their own way. At times, the number of rules—especially those imposed on women—are a bit stifling, but there’s an undeniable beauty to some of the customs and rich culture Rafiq and Layla try so hard to instill in their children, things they were once taught by their own parents.

    Among other things, what struck me hard was the arranged marriage of Rafiq and Layla. On one hand, I admired her strength—putting her faith in a complete stranger and starting over in a new world—but on the other, my heart broke at the thought of

    . I'm not naive to the fact that this happens everyday, in many cultures around the world, it’s just hard for the lover of love in me to remove the passion from the equation and view marriage as simply an arrangement.

    The final piece of the story brings

    full circle and in doing so, it just might make you look at life a bit differently. The thoughts and feelings are so raw, so gut-wrenching; I dare you not to cry. Not to be affected. Not to be

    . Seeing the world through

    person’s eyes

    me—completely and utterly. There are no words to adequately capture the power of this ending, so I'll just settle with: I wholeheartedly

    it.

    Not only is this an unforgettable journey, but there’s an important and timely message behind the words—don’t ever assume you know what someone else is thinking or feeling. A person’s behavior, outward appearance or words, hurtful or not, are by no means a true indication of what they’re

    feeling or experiencing inside. Being vulnerable should never be viewed as a weakness.

    **

    🧡

  • Kristin (KC) - Traveling Sister

    A colorful

    and truly a story to savor, A PLACE FOR US uses a soothing voice to deliver a powerful message that will hug the hearts and hold the hands of its readers!

    This author lets us know quite distinctly that we are not just readers; we are powerful beings capable of changing the world by altering the way we think. By making an effort to view life through the eye

    A colorful

    and truly a story to savor, A PLACE FOR US uses a soothing voice to deliver a powerful message that will hug the hearts and hold the hands of its readers!

    This author lets us know quite distinctly that we are not just readers; we are powerful beings capable of changing the world by altering the way we think. By making an effort to view life through the eyes of others, to consider their struggles and downfalls, and to recognize that we are ultimately one and the same, no matter our gender, race, religious beliefs, or social stature.

    Every single moment in this story is made to materialize before your eyes through writing so profound and poetic it will cause you to pause in tiny moments of silence just to fully absorb the enormous weight of a

    .

    We not only

    the struggles of this beautiful Indian-American Muslim family, but we are invited to step inside their minds, embody their pain, cry through their failures, and rejoice within their triumphs. I found myself in tears more times than I can count, from being so utterly

    , and so humbly inspired.

    Being a character-driven story at heart, I feel compelled to introduce you to this family, because there is nothing better than characters so well-constructed they end up feeling like friends.

    is the youngest child and son of

    and

    , and brother to sisters

    and

    . This is the main cast of characters guaranteed to find their way into your heart. I was mere minutes inside this story, yet already fully invested in each of their lives.

    The story opens at a wedding in present time, where Amar has returned to his family after years of estrangement. Secrets from the past slowly begin to reveal themselves through a timeline that glides seamlessly in and out of past and present settings.

    The character development is

    . No one is immune to failure nor safe from heartache. This is NOT a neatly-depicted drama with over-the-top lessons and troubles that are magically repaired by the end.

    It is

    , and delivers one of those most genuine portrayals of an intimate and complex family dynamic I’ve come across in a long,

    time.

    You can feel the painful trials of each and every one of these characters—and perhaps you can even relate...

    …who feels trapped inside the demands of his Muslim faith and his internal doubt. Born in America, but feeling every bit an outsider, Amar lives in constant fear of betraying his family and their customs. He fights between what he wants, and what he “should” want, never feeling as though any of it is ever good enough.

    …and her perpetual need to please her father, as though her entire self-worth lies solely upon his approval. Often ordered by her mother to “

    ”, silencing what should otherwise be viewed as admirable determination. And then there’s the colossal pressure placed upon her as eldest child and greatest influencer of her siblings.

    …who refuse to grant their children the option to live freely within their country, adamant that they adhere to their rigid yet beautiful customs, without granting even an inch of wiggle-room ... but there are times they harbor guilt and question their choices, finding it difficult to create a balance.

    As the title suggests, this story exemplifies the idea of finding one’s

    in life: literally, figuratively, emotionally, culturally, and on all levels—including a place within one’s family, and even inside one’s “self”.

    I appreciated that this story’s timeline intersected with 9/11 not in a drawn out manner, but just enough to shed light on the equally unjust side of the coin: I personally remember the shock of that day--

    --waking up the next morning afraid of being attacked. What I failed to consider were the innocent ones waking up that same morning afraid of being

    .

    How it must feel for a good person—a peace-loving person—to be judged and condemned for the hateful act of another.

    Various accounts of unfairness and judgment, family strife, true love lost, all saturate these pages—but there is also

    much

    .

    Those precious little moments in life, so seemingly simple and ordinary that creep in quietly and leave almost entirely unnoticed.

    children watching fireworks for the first time with their parents. A walk through a garden, a drive for ice cream. Laughing at the kitchen table while gathering for a meal. The bewitching charm of young love...

    These delicate moments are ones we remember the longest and treasure the hardest, and this story is

    with the recognition of those “little” things. It highlights their impact and embraces their worth, showing us that it is ultimately the simple things in life that end up defining us. The simple moments that connect us all.

    A PLACE FOR US emphasizes the importance of family, relationships, forgiveness, and what it means to love someone wholly and without condition.

    This is a

    piece I won’t soon forget, that touches the heart, provokes deep thought, instills awareness, and inspires hope. Each word is carefully chosen and thoughtfully strung together in such an eloquent arrangement that this story doesn’t speak, but

    .

    I love this story with

    of me, and I hope you will, too.

    :::::I read this with my lovely Traveling Sisters, whose thoughtful analysis and emotional commentary made this experience even more enjoyable! Thanks so much, ladies ❤️:::::

    *

    *

  • Norma * Traveling Sister

    5 ***** Glowing Stars! Wow! This book was an absolutely phenomenal read and was quickly placed into my Goodreads Favourite Reads shelf for 2018!

    This book was absolutely everything to me! My thoughts and emotions did not change from the very first sentence of this book and held dear right to the very last sentence. If anything it just reminded me of what I seek and why I love to read! A PLACE FOR US moved me more than any other novel has ever moved me before.

    I have never been so excited to have

    5 ***** Glowing Stars! Wow! This book was an absolutely phenomenal read and was quickly placed into my Goodreads Favourite Reads shelf for 2018!

    This book was absolutely everything to me! My thoughts and emotions did not change from the very first sentence of this book and held dear right to the very last sentence. If anything it just reminded me of what I seek and why I love to read! A PLACE FOR US moved me more than any other novel has ever moved me before.

    I have never been so excited to have received a book in the mail like I was with this one. Upon opening the package and actually having this book in my hands (giving it a smell & a hug ~ I think all of us Traveling Sisters can relate to that!) the first thing I noticed was that beautiful cover. This story is just as gorgeous and beautiful as that cover!

    A PLACE FOR US by FATIMA FARHEEN MIRZA was an absolutely fantastic, powerful, thought-provoking, moving, and heartfelt novel that has affected me in ways that no other novel has ever done before. I was immediately drawn into this story and savoured every single sentence! I absolutely love the title of this book and found it was extremely fitting to this story. No matter who we are or where we are from there is A Place for Us!

    FATIMA FARHEEN MIRZA delivers a steady-paced, fascinating and beautifully written story here with interesting, compelling, realistic and believable characters that I absolutely fell in love with. The story is told in multiple perspectives which alternates between the voices of Layla, Hadia, and Amar, with a surprise narrative near the end which I absolutely loved. We see the same events unfold through the different perspectives and what the significance of each event meant to them and how it ultimately shapes each character. We really get a good look and understanding into each of these events. Even though there is a lot of memories within each chapter that flip around in place and time I didn’t find it at all confusing and really enjoyed the way that this story was told.

    In the end I thought this was such an important, touching and powerful story and I am so happy that I had the pleasure of reading it! This book has the power to change the way we think and feel and has reminded me of all the reasons of why I love to read! 💕 This is by far one of the best books that I have ever read!! Would highly recommend!

    I read this book along with my fellow Traveling Sisters! Thank you so much ladies for another awesome reading experience!! ❤️

    Thank you so much to Goodreads, Sarah Jessica Parker's new imprint SJP for Hogarth, Fatima Farheen Mirza, and Penguin Random House for the opportunity to read an advanced physical copy of this book in exchange for a review!

    Review written and posted on our themed book blog Two Sisters Lost In A Coulee Reading.

    Coulee: a term applied rather loosely to different landforms, all of which refer to a kind of valley.

  • Emily May

    I am so excited about this:

    We talked about

    , working with Sarah Jessica Parker, and favourite books!

    Do you love t

    I am so excited about this:

    We talked about

    , working with Sarah Jessica Parker, and favourite books!

    Do you love those slow-burning, quiet family dramas that take you so fully into the lives of the characters? The kind that show complex human beings trying, often failing, and trying again to do their best? It's not an action-packed fantasy or a spine-tingling thriller, but get me in the right mood and I adore these kinds of books.

    is one of my personal favourites.

    And

    is a perfect example of one of these books. It moves from the present to the past and back again to tell a carefully-crafted tale of an Indian-American Muslim family and all the conflicts and love that exist between its members. It spans several decades and explores themes of culture, faith and identity.

    "Somewhere (A Place For Us)" is a song that musical lovers will know well. It comes from

    , which sees two lovers torn apart by cultural and familial differences, in the vein of

    . This book tells a similar story, yet the divisions exist within one single family instead of between two.

    The book opens with a wedding. The bride is Hadia - a young woman who we soon learn has broken tradition by choosing her own husband and embracing more modern interpretations of Islam. We also learn that she has invited her brother, Amar, to the wedding and this will be the first time the family has been reunited since Amar ran away years before.

    Then we move back in time and a picture slowly starts to build of this family. Mirza shows the intricacies in relationships, whether it be between husband and wife, brother and sister, or mother and daughter. As this family is drawn in detail, we are also taken through experiences relating to 9/11, forbidden love, and the loss of a close friend whose death affects them all.

    Ultimately,

    is about what it means to be both American and Muslim; it is about the clash of religious and cultural tradition with modern ideas and the right to choose. Hadia faces decisions about wearing the hijab and arranged marriage - can she please her parents and be her own person at the same time? Is it possible to unite the old with the new?

    My only (small) complaint is that I think another round of editing could have shaved off some of the parts that rehashed the same ideas over again. Depth is excellent; waffling is not. But anyway, it is a minor issue and I really enjoyed the book.

    This is the first book from

    new imprint SJP for Hogarth and I have to say I am intrigued to see what else they publish.

    |

    |

    |

    |

  • Debbie

    Unlike the rest of the world, including sweet Sarah Jessica Parker, I did not drool over this one, unless you count the drool that appeared when I dozed off in absolute boredom. I want my hours back! Yeah yeah yeah, I know. I should have ditched it. I guess I was just committed to torturing myself.

    I was so looking forward to this one, rave reviews everywhere, oh I’m sure I’ll love it. The story sounded interesting: an Indian Muslim family living in America. My balloon was ful

    Unlike the rest of the world, including sweet Sarah Jessica Parker, I did not drool over this one, unless you count the drool that appeared when I dozed off in absolute boredom. I want my hours back! Yeah yeah yeah, I know. I should have ditched it. I guess I was just committed to torturing myself.

    I was so looking forward to this one, rave reviews everywhere, oh I’m sure I’ll love it. The story sounded interesting: an Indian Muslim family living in America. My balloon was full of good air but when I started reading, the great deflate began.

    I’m going right to my lists. I want to be nice and say there was a small Joy Jar, but honestly, it’s a stretch for me to appreciate much about this snooze. But I’ll try.

    -Well written.

    -Occasionally profound.

    -Some psychological insight and introspection. The reasons we do the things we do, the thoughts behind our actions.

    -Nuanced relationships.

    -Zeroes in on the little gestures and private things we do, some unconsciously. This was cool.

    -Big secrets, extensive guilt. This was interesting.

    -Ended my painful procrastination streak: I FINALLY found the time to fill my Amazon cart with must-haves (like food-safe mineral oil for my new cutting board). I looked for any excuse to get away from the book.

    (I know, it’s cheating to put that snarky last item on the list, but I can’t help it.)

    The whole damn thing seemed coated in Valium: the tone, the plot, the characters. A three-in-one snooze-fest! The language was so flat I was jonesin’ for some jazz. It was a mumbly monotone, I was a squeaky scream—what a show. I did get used to the quiet language, but it took me about half the book. By that time I had found a bunch of other reasons to hate it. Damn, I should beware whenever reviews say the book is quiet. Nine times out of ten, the quiet will make me climb the walls.

    Is there an editor in the house? A big crime, since it led to prolonged torture, was that this book was WAY too long, like a hundred pages too long. Oh god, did I look at the bottom of the page! Have I really only read 7 percent of this book? Are you kidding me? Could my Kindle page-counter be malfunctioning??

    (which sounds like a line in a croon-y country song). The characters are stereotypes: We have two good daughters, a black-sheep son, a kind mother, a nice dad with a slight temper. Everyone angsty. The plot was trite: Strict parents want their kids to follow traditions and the kids don’t want to; both parents and kids play the hide-important-things game; kids overachieve, underachieve, have forbidden crushes; blah blah blah. (I know, I know, if the story had been infused with juice, I probably wouldn’t be saying it was trite—it’s all in the telling.)

    I didn’t connect with the characters, partly because they were a bore and partly because they were too passive. It’s that Valium coating I was talking about. Of course, I always like the black sheep, but in this book he was MIA a lot. He was the focus, yes, but we didn’t get to see him or his point of view much.

    Totally in the background. Huh? Why didn’t she get developed? Just seems weird to have a family saga where one kid doesn’t have shape or voice.

    Even in real life I like talkers, so it’s no surprise that a family of Quiet Ones would drive me nuts. I craved dialogue, interaction. The story is more about what doesn’t get said, and that’s all cool and nuanced. Still, I wanted more in-your-face drama.

    I wanted to see the ingredients hopping around in the blender; I wanted to see the conflict of cultures. Instead, the book is focused on the family and its traditions, not about the problems of assimilating into American culture and not about friendships with people outside their culture. For the most part, it seems like the kids have blended in pretty well. There is some reaction to 9/11, but not enough.

    All you want to talk about is yesterday! The book starts with a wedding, but we don’t get back to the wedding until more than half the book is over. At the 59% mark, to be exact. (Of course I know this, since I was constantly looking at the Percent Read info at the bottom of the page, lol.) I was reading about the past. And reading about the past. And reading about the past….okay, can’t we please please please go back to the present? Can we please go back to today? Can we see what happens at the wedding? Don’t leave me hanging for half the book! The past isn’t presented sequentially—it jumps around--and that didn’t bother me a bit. But I would have liked it if the present had come back into focus now and then, between the blasts of the past. I was impatient to find out what was happening in the here and now. I get that the author wanted to flesh out the characters so that when we returned to the present, the actions would be loaded, but my annoyance with the structure of the story was so stubborn, I couldn’t appreciate the author’s plan.

    At first, there was a smattering of religion. I could handle that. I figured it was just there to convince us of how important religion was to the parents, which was reasonable. However, the entire last part of the book felt like a sermon. And as the end was approaching (oh baby let me be done with this book!), the pages became more and more full of religion. And here I was, hoping that we’d return to some drama. But oh no.

    Throughout the book, there are phrases in Urdu. This is a pet peeve of mine: I hate it when books include phrases in another language. I’m assuming the writer thinks it adds authenticity, but to me it just puts big blanks into the sentences. I don’t understand the words and phrases and I will never remember them, so what’s the point?

    Very occasionally, there was a point of view problem. And yes, occasionally the writer committed the sin of using “try and” instead of “try to.”

    I can’t say what I wanted and expected to happen because I don’t want to give spoilers, but I can say that it was drama I was craving. Instead, the ending was mostly talk of religion and regrets.

    I read a million 5-star reviews, many from friends, so I expected to love this book. Plus, I got sucked into the hype that Sarah Jessica Parker generated. (She has just launched a book publishing imprint and chose this as her first book.) I saw her with the author on a talk show. Parker was effusive. Man, what a salesperson! She convinced me that this book was the bending end—I was salivating to get my hands on it. But wait. Parker has always been an actress, not a book publisher. And why would I assume that she would like a book I would like? Geez.

    The style of writing made me strangely uncomfortable, like it didn’t match me. It grated on my nerves instead of being soothing or wonderful. I never wanted to pick the book up.

    But just about everyone in the universe loved this book, so don’t listen to me. I'm an alien.

    Thanks to NetGalley for the advance copy.

  • Sarah Jessica Parker

    It is with tremendous excitement that I’m sharing Fatima Farheen Mirza’s novel, A Place for Us, the first book on the SJP for Hogarth list. When we first conceived of this imprint, and imagined the kinds of books we wanted to publish, I went back to my own bookshelves—to books I loved, books that expanded my horizons, and opened me up to other worlds. In A Place for Us, I found all this and more: an exquisitely tender-hearted story of a Muslim Indian American family caught between cultures, and

    It is with tremendous excitement that I’m sharing Fatima Farheen Mirza’s novel, A Place for Us, the first book on the SJP for Hogarth list. When we first conceived of this imprint, and imagined the kinds of books we wanted to publish, I went back to my own bookshelves—to books I loved, books that expanded my horizons, and opened me up to other worlds. In A Place for Us, I found all this and more: an exquisitely tender-hearted story of a Muslim Indian American family caught between cultures, and a deeply moving story of identity and belonging.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.