Marilla of Green Gables

Marilla of Green Gables

A bold, heartfelt tale of life at Green Gables . . . before Anne: A marvelously entertaining and moving historical novel, set in rural Prince Edward Island in the nineteenth century, that imagines the young life of spinster Marilla Cuthbert, and the choices that will open her life to the possibility of heartbreak—and unimaginable greatnessPlucky and ambitious, Marilla Cuth...

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Title:Marilla of Green Gables
Author:Sarah McCoy
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Marilla of Green Gables Reviews

  • Susan Peterson

    In Marilla of Green Gables, readers are transported to Avonlea in this warm and wonderful book, filled with love and heartache and sacrifice. Marilla’s spirit shines through, a young woman shaped by regret and happenstance. I felt so close to Marilla, as if I’d been given a window to her soul. She is a heroine to remember and to behold...devoted and determined to do what’s right, not just for herself, but for all of those she loved. I was entranced at this peek into the world of Green Gables bef

    In Marilla of Green Gables, readers are transported to Avonlea in this warm and wonderful book, filled with love and heartache and sacrifice. Marilla’s spirit shines through, a young woman shaped by regret and happenstance. I felt so close to Marilla, as if I’d been given a window to her soul. She is a heroine to remember and to behold...devoted and determined to do what’s right, not just for herself, but for all of those she loved. I was entranced at this peek into the world of Green Gables before the arrival of Anne. Sarah McCoy’s lyrical writing breathes new life into these wonderful characters and this spectacular setting.

  • Betty

    Fans of the

    series of books fondly remember Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert, guardians of the spirited Anne Shirley. If you've ever wondered about life at Green Gables when the Cuthbert siblings were young, you'll want to check out Sarah McCoy's

    .

    The story is told from Marilla's point of view, and stays true to the character we came to know and love in

    books. Through her eyes, we meet her parents and Aunt Izzy for the first time, as well

    Fans of the

    series of books fondly remember Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert, guardians of the spirited Anne Shirley. If you've ever wondered about life at Green Gables when the Cuthbert siblings were young, you'll want to check out Sarah McCoy's

    .

    The story is told from Marilla's point of view, and stays true to the character we came to know and love in

    books. Through her eyes, we meet her parents and Aunt Izzy for the first time, as well as younger versions of Matthew, John Blythe, and her lifelong friend, Rachel.

    There's always a tiny part of me that worries when an author revisits a character/family from a beloved classic. Sometimes it

    . Sometimes

    . And when you're really lucky, it feels like you just reconnected with an old friend—which is how I felt as I read

    .

    Wonderfully written, with characters that felt the same as Montgomery envisioned them so long ago, this is a fitting prequel to the series. McCoy swept me back to Avonlea, and it felt as if I'd never left. It was delightful to see how her friendship began with Rachel, and it tugged at my heartstrings to see painfully shy Matthew working up the courage to court a girl, knowing all the while that something would happen, and it wouldn't last. The same applies to Marilla's bittersweet romance with John Blythe; I knew it didn't work out between them, and yet... part of me wished it would.

    If you loved the

    books, I highly recommend you read

    . It's a beautiful story that has earned its place within this series.

  • Sarah

    Oh, Green Gables, how I love thee! I first encountered Anne (with an "E" thank you very much!) when I was 10 or 11. It instantly became a favorite book series so much so that I chose Prince Edward Island as the topic of a seventh-grade geography research paper. Anne Shirley endeared herself to me. I longed to be a red head full of spunk as loyal and noble as she. I gave little thought to the character Marilla. In part, I believe this is because I was a kid so I found characters my age of much gr

    Oh, Green Gables, how I love thee! I first encountered Anne (with an "E" thank you very much!) when I was 10 or 11. It instantly became a favorite book series so much so that I chose Prince Edward Island as the topic of a seventh-grade geography research paper. Anne Shirley endeared herself to me. I longed to be a red head full of spunk as loyal and noble as she. I gave little thought to the character Marilla. In part, I believe this is because I was a kid so I found characters my age of much greater interest (save, of course, for dear sweet Matthew.) However, author Sarah McCoy's "prequel" opened my eyes to the extraordinary woman who was Marilla Cuthbert.

    Marilla of Green Gables tells Marilla's story before Anne enteered her life. Tracing her life from the tender age of 13, readers learn how Marilla became the strong seemingly stoic, but ultimately loving woman at the helm of Green Gables. We also see the bond between sister and brother, Marilla and Matthew, two siblings united by both tragedy and familial blood.

    I finished this novel with a peaceful contended sigh and a deep longing to revisit the Anne series (and travel to PEI!) Anne lovers rejoice, Sarah McCoy has done Lucy Maud Montgomery proud!

  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader

    ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐.5

    Marilla of Green Gables is a beauty Anne of Green Gables fans will not want to miss!

    Marilla Cuthbert’s life prior to Anne begins when she is thirteen years old. Her mother has passed away, and she is now responsible for all the “wife’s” duties on the farm, growing up overnight. Also helping her is her beloved brother, Matthew, and her father, Hugh.

    Set in charming Prince Edward Island during the 19th century, Mar

    ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️.5

    Marilla of Green Gables is a beauty Anne of Green Gables fans will not want to miss!

    Marilla Cuthbert’s life prior to Anne begins when she is thirteen years old. Her mother has passed away, and she is now responsible for all the “wife’s” duties on the farm, growing up overnight. Also helping her is her beloved brother, Matthew, and her father, Hugh.

    Set in charming Prince Edward Island during the 19th century, Marilla of Green Gables is an imagined version of what her life may have been like.

    The town we all know and love, Avonlea, sparkles just as much as it did with Anne. While there are limits for the life of a farm girl, Marilla has a connection outside of Avonlea to her Aunt Izzy who is a “spinster” and seamstress living in a city. It is through her aunt that Marilla learns about life outside of Green Gables, and she makes friends.

    Of course there is a little romance with another farmer, and Marilla is busy delving into a world of politics and even abolition. Just where will Marilla land in her adult life? The safe, expected life at Green Gables, or in a much more wordlier life outside?

    McCoy’s writing is lyrical, and it made me long for the nostalgia of reading Anne of Green Gables as a child. There is quality backstory here that adds to our understanding of Anne’s stories. It is like all the dots were connected in a beautiful way!

    If you are a fan of Anne, you will be charmed by Marilla’s imagined life! I wonder if McCoy will take on another Green Gables character!

    Thank you to William Morrow for the physical copy. All opinions are my own.

    My reviews can also be found on my blog:

  • Kate Olson

    Thanks to TLC Book Tours and William Morrow for this free review copy!

    I was so nervous going into this book, but it 100% amazed me at how perfectly McCoy took us back to Avonlea and fit us back into that fictional world. I consider this an absolute must-read for fans of the Anne of Green Gables series. An unofficial prequel, if you will.

  • Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    .

    Marilla Cuthbert is only thirteen-years-old when her whole life is turned upside down. Her beloved mother dies in childbirth and she's suddenly the one responsible for all of the tasks of a farm wife: cooking, sewing, and overseeing Green Gables. Of course, she has her brother M

    .

    Marilla Cuthbert is only thirteen-years-old when her whole life is turned upside down. Her beloved mother dies in childbirth and she's suddenly the one responsible for all of the tasks of a farm wife: cooking, sewing, and overseeing Green Gables. Of course, she has her brother Matthew and her father Hugh, but the loss of her mother will stay with her for the rest of her life. As she grows up, Green Gables is her main focus, but friends and family will draw her out into the world. And, she will even find that there may be someone out there who could be more than and a friend...

  • TL

    I received this via Goodreads giveaways in exchange for an honest review. All my opinions are my own.

    ----

    Confession: I haven't read Anne of Green Gables yet (Hoping to this summer/fall). I entered the giveaway because: it sounded interesting.. and Sarah McCoy had written it. Her novel

    was my first of hers and I fell in love with her writing.

    ---

    I can only speak to my enjoyment of this particular book.. while I can't say if Marilla is true to character, I can say I fell in lov

    I received this via Goodreads giveaways in exchange for an honest review. All my opinions are my own.

    ----

    Confession: I haven't read Anne of Green Gables yet (Hoping to this summer/fall). I entered the giveaway because: it sounded interesting.. and Sarah McCoy had written it. Her novel

    was my first of hers and I fell in love with her writing.

    ---

    I can only speak to my enjoyment of this particular book.. while I can't say if Marilla is true to character, I can say I fell in love with Avonlea and everyone in this story.

    Marilla was a strong and interesting woman. I admired her for being herself and how she dealt with the things that happened in her life (though a few of the customs back then had me scoffing and rolling my eyes). She's someone I could see myself being friends with.

    The story moves at its own pace, content on telling you things the way it wants to. It felt like I could step into the pages and walk among everything and everyone.

    Matthew and John were sweethearts as well.. Rachel abd Izzy were firecrackers:)

    Would recommend, as well as her other works. *waves*

    (My advanced copy is 300 pages.. book page here says 240.. fyi for anyone who wants to know)

  • Katie Ziegler (Life Between Words)

    I may bump this star rating up after I've let it simmer for awhile. What a DELIGHTFUL book - both an homage to Anne of Green Gables and also a story that can stand completely on its own. I am always apprehensive when there are spin-offs to books (or movies, or any media); it's just so unlikely that it will live up to the beloved original. And of course, this book cannot replace Anne of Green Gables in my mind and my heart. BUT, this book did perfect justice to the characters that I know and love

    I may bump this star rating up after I've let it simmer for awhile. What a DELIGHTFUL book - both an homage to Anne of Green Gables and also a story that can stand completely on its own. I am always apprehensive when there are spin-offs to books (or movies, or any media); it's just so unlikely that it will live up to the beloved original. And of course, this book cannot replace Anne of Green Gables in my mind and my heart. BUT, this book did perfect justice to the characters that I know and love. It gave us insight into Marilla and Matthew - their growing up and entering into their middle years. I absolutely loved the little glimpses and nods we get to all sorts of people that we meet in the Anne series. And the people populating Avonlea (and Avonlea itself) felt true to the original. It was just so lovely. Having said that, I do feel like Marilla was so much softer and less no-nonsense in this book than we see at the beginning of Anne - however, perhaps I should offer some more grace in that respect because the book ends about 15 or 16 years before we meet our favorite redhead, and thus Marilla has some time to grow more prickly (and we all know she's soft-hearted underneath those prickles, it just takes Anne to slough them off).

    The premise of the book was inspired by a little unsolved mystery we are introduced to in Anne of Green Gables, when Marilla reveals to Anne that she used to be good friends with Gilbert Blythe's father - John. Even more that people used to call him her 'beau.' So, going into Marilla of Green Gables, we already know how that story will end. And it's not happily ever after. But how that happens is what makes this story. And knowing that it doesn't end in marital bliss only makes it more poignant and bittersweet. And even though I knew how it would end I kept hoping that they would make choices that would turn the inevitable around. But of course, then we wouldn't meet Anne 16 years later, and that truly would be tragic. What a heart conundrum!

    Anyway, I loved it. For fans of Anne or fans of absorbing historical fiction - although I think you'll like it even better if you're acquainted with L M Montgomery's lovely Anne books.

  • Manybooks

    With my sincere apologies to those readers who obviously have very much enjoyed Sarah McCoy's

    (and I do realise that I seem to be rather the minority at this point), but I have in many ways really and actively despised this novel. For even though

    appears to be well enough researched and I do appreciate that Sarah McCoy does not seem to use all too many anachronisms with regard to the physical manifestations of time and place (and the clothes that p

    With my sincere apologies to those readers who obviously have very much enjoyed Sarah McCoy's

    (and I do realise that I seem to be rather the minority at this point), but I have in many ways really and actively despised this novel. For even though

    appears to be well enough researched and I do appreciate that Sarah McCoy does not seem to use all too many anachronisms with regard to the physical manifestations of time and place (and the clothes that people tended to wear), from a personal reading pleasure point of view, as well as a devoted fan of L.M. Montgomery's

    , to and for me it sure does seem as though the author might get all the personal names right but that she does not in any manner tell a plausible and believable enough story, or rather and for me very much importantly, essentially, that Sarah McCoy does not relate a convincing and persuasive Marilla Cuthbert focussed account that in my opinion holds sufficiently true to the character of Marilla Cuthbert as she is portrayed by L.M. Montgomery in

    (and actually, not just Marilla Cuthbert is unconvincing and a bit strangely conceptualised and shown). I mean, it is I guess easy enough to recognise and even appreciate how in

    Sarah McCoy has realistically rendered and depicted shy and often retiring Matthew Cuthbert, but both Marilla Cuthbert with her political activism and Rachel White (the future Rachel Lynde) with her almost Anne Shirley like active imagination and giggling girlishness bear in my own humble opinion not much if any strong resemblances to how either character is in any manner shown and depicted by L.M. Montgomery in both

    and indeed also its sequels.

    However, it was when Sarah McCoy describes and presents Marilla Cuthbert as becoming an abolitionist that I chose to stop reading

    (as for one, that entire Underground Railroad scenario appears incredibly artificial and rather tacked on for political correctness and avant-gardishness and for two, since L.M. Montgomery herself always had a pretty standard and also at times rather patronising and indeed sometimes even quite negative attitude towards individuals of different ethnicities, while I might well and gladly as a 20th and 21st century reader morally and philosophically agree with Marilla Cuthbert being shown as an abolitionist, looking at her realistically and especially from how she herself appears within the pages of

    and as a literary creation of L.M. Montgomery, Sarah McCoy's Marilla Cuthbert fighting against slavery and being a staunch abolitionist just does not from a literary and from a L.M. Montgomery point of departure make all that much if any sense, it simply does not mesh at all). And therefore, while I of course do respect those of you who have loved

    for me, this novel most definitely has been a massive and yes also a very bitter and sad personal disappointment (not the worst piece of historical fiction I have read by any stretch of the imagination but still most certainly only a one star ranking to and for me, as Sarah McCoy's Marillla Cuthbert is just so totally not L.M. Montgomery's Marilla Cuthbert).

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