Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House

Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House

With extraordinary access to the West Wing, Michael Wolff reveals what happened behind-the-scenes in the first nine months of the most controversial presidency of our time in Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House.Since Donald Trump was sworn in as the 45th President of the United States, the country―and the world―has witnessed a stormy, outrageous, and absolutely mes...

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Title:Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House
Author:Michael Wolff
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Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House Reviews

  • Will Byrnes

    Michael Wolff has given us a drone’s (dragon’s?) eye view of the competing centers vying to be the power behind the throne, with some looking, in the longer term, at carving paths for their own succession to the highest position in the realm. There is a mad king who needs to be handled. Centers of power arise, mor

    Michael Wolff has given us a drone’s (dragon’s?) eye view of the competing centers vying to be the power behind the throne, with some looking, in the longer term, at carving paths for their own succession to the highest position in the realm. There is a mad king who needs to be handled. Centers of power arise, morph, wage battles both silent and overt, succeed and fail, rise, die, and sometimes rise again. What we see in Michael Wolff’s

    , from our lofty perch, is the geography of chaos in the known world of the White House. Games will be played. Backs will be stabbed. Sadly, there is no magic, only sleight of hand. And it remains to be seen if nuclear dragons will be unleashed.

    The juicy bits of this book have been everywhere for the last few weeks. It is highly quotable, and the publisher, Holt, the author, their PR people, and the major news outlets have been flooding the zone. Whether on-line or in print, over airwaves on TV or radio, through cable, and probably via the deep-state-news (WDSN?) that beams directly into peoples’ minds, all media have been all agog with the many looks at this elephant to which they have been privy.

    With so much blanket coverage coming at you, one might be forgiven for wondering whether you first saw the item you just read in the book, or came across it somewhere else. It is a little bit unnerving. I will spare you the further confusion of adding

    those bits here. I really have to put some in, though. I mean you know them already, right? How many synonyms can you find for

    ?

    is the biggest book of the moment, the Wall Street Journal reporting that it had sold a million copies as of Monday, January 8, 2018, a day

    than its scheduled release. Remains to be seen, of course, with a steady stream of books on Trump being published, how long this frenzy will persist. But the last time I was aware of people standing on line for hours to get a book, it included the words

    and

    This book, in the words of our former vice president, is a big fucking deal.

    - image from Mediaite.com

    The bottom line of

    is that it presents Donald Trump as unfit to serve as president, based not on the dark view and negative press of his opposition, but the been-there-OMG-did-you-see-that experience of his own staff and supporters.

    Wolff uses named and unnamed sources. It seems clear that his primary go-to was one Steve Bannon, a weaver of webs, a bomb-thrower, a snake in the grass, a back-stabber, a manipulator, a white supremacist, a gifted media manipulator, and a pretty bright and articulate, if sartorially challenged guy. One might be tempted to dismiss Wolff’s book based on this reliance. Don’t. There are plenty of other sources feeding the narrative. The question is whether the image Wolff generates by making a composite of the incoming bits makes sense. Is it plausible? Is it correct? Having seen Wolff interviewed on multiple news and entertainment shows, and attending to the back-and-forths between him and knowledgeable news people, it seems eminently clear that he got it right. There are probably some details that err a bit here and there. Maybe this person was not at that meeting, or a date may be off. I expect that the only inaccuracies to be found here will be of that sort. Niggling, beside the point. And blown way out of proportion by those with an interest in distracting you from the core content of the book. That the president attempted to stop its publication should tell you something.

    Michael Wolff is a veteran author and journalist, with seven prior books to his credit. He has been nominated for the National Magazine Award three times, and accused by people he has written about of fabricating. The absence of actual lawsuits against him suggests that complaints were less than firmly grounded. He is a serious writer and should be taken seriously. It is a bit mind-boggling the access he had to the actual White House, but he lays it out. He hung out in the WH, with a huge degree of access and was able to get input from the people working or passing through there, for months. Was the administration insane for allowing this? You betcha. But they did, another sign of their unpreparedness.

    Inauguration day offered a look at what was to come.

    As noted above, the geography through which Wolff’s tale travels is one of sundry kingdoms. I could not help but imagine the opening credits of

    as we approach each power center, the models for each of the city-states animating, offering moving, 3-D representations of each kingdom’s imagery and motifs. The three (sadly, not seven) are the alt-right of Bannon and his allies (clearly White Walkers), the mainstream GOP crowd epitomized by Reince Preibus, and the family wing, considered by Bannon to be of a liberal-democratic bent, in the person of Jared Kushner and the president’s daughter, Ivanka Trump, aka Jarvanka. (Cersei and Jamie?).

    - image from DesignCrowd.com, by way of Huff-Po

    The forward motion of the story is the events of Trump’s campaign, but mostly presidency up to October, 2017. I know, I know. One of the problems with political books is that they can often be outdated in fairly short order. The several months between October and the book’s publication is a lifetime in Trump years. It is impressive, given the daily churning of personnel and events in the DC universe (not the multiverse) these days that

    book on Trumplandia still has relevance by the time ink on paper makes its way to readers. And yet, the issues raised here, the main issue, is momentous, and sticks.

    Wolff has offered a host of quotes from his sources, many named, that question Swamp Thing’s competence, not just to function as president, but to function as a human being. His own staff frequently mention the applicability of the 25th amendment (although in the real world that is a total fantasy) and the likelihood of impeachment. The sound of Robert Mueller’s approaching steps echoes throughout the work, clearly feeding Trump’s paranoia about being treated unfairly, and boosting his fear of being found out, labeled a squatter or deadbeat, and evicted.

    Wolff, with his title, and content, offers a wonderful

    image. But there are plenty more that could easily apply.

    is one that he mentions, a particularly apt metaphor, given that it seemed clear to many of us, even during the campaign, that Trump, like Bialystock and Bloom, got into the presidential race for the money, and never really intended to win. This is confirmed in the book. Personally, I think Max Bialystock would have made a better president. Another scenario that Wolff mentions is the relationship of Thomas Cromwell to Henry VIII, wonderfully portrayed in the novel

    (no relation), with Steve Bannon in the Cromwell role and you-know-who as the guy who made such a gigantic mess, because he simply had to have things his way. One could also consider

    (the original), with all the plotting, back-stabbing, and hunger for power that made that series such fun to watch, although, after Bannon as Francis Urquart, the personnel parallels fade a bit.

    gives us Trump as the single-minded Queen of Hearts.

    might offer an image of ineptitude, if one ignores the fact that Trump has overseen the greatest looting by criminals of the national treasury in the nation’s history. For all his intellectual challenges Swamp Thing is a larger than life character with very little core, a made-for-Television president.

    - image from NY Magazine

    One of the things I most enjoyed was Wolff’s take on

    . Anthony Scaramucci is the sort of Damon Runyon hanger-on one might expect to see in Guys and Dolls, or maybe a Batman flick, all puffery and attitude smeared over a core of ignorance, inflated by cartoonishly excessive self-confidence and corruption. From the description in

    , it is not hard to imagine him in a too-wide pin-striped suit, shoulder-padded, sporting excessive pancake makeup, swinging a pocket watch from a chain, and laughing uncontrollably as he kicks some poor shmo that his minions are holding down for him, because he was a few dollars short on his protection payment.

    There are some things missing from the book, of course. There is not the sort of detailed biographical material better found in an actual biography. Forget seeing an autobiography. Anything Trump truly wrote would probably be close to an actual choose-your-own-adventure kid book, given his inability to remain focused for more than a few minutes. There is not a lot about serious international threats, with one exception. In a press conference at his Bedminster, NJ property:

    Thus an increased concern about the danger of someone implementing the launch codes in a fit of pique or confusion. A fair bit of that intercontinental exchange of verbal ordnance occurred after the book was written, most notably the “My Button is bigger than your Button” lunacy. There is little discussion, although it gets a mention, of the potential implications of Trump’s autocratic leanings. The telling of the tale is much more about what has already happened as opposed to what might.

    This is not a book about policy. It is portrait of a White House as a theater of political warfare, a candidate who never really wanted or expected to be president and a president who is not only completely out of his depth, but who shows not only no capacity, but no interest in learning to swim. Even the people who work for him see him as unintelligent, narcissistic, incurious, and lazy. They even suggest he is losing his grip on reality, presuming he ever had one. It is certainly entertaining, the bits about Trump’s TV addiction, how he manages to cover his bald pate, and his pettiness about not wanting the cleaning staff to pick up his clothes from the floor. I mean, really, is he ashamed of being seen as a slob? Eating burgers in bed in front of the TV will probably gain him more support than criticism. I mean, even I can get on board with that, and I do not have a kind view of the man. But the more serious element is his mental fitness, and the danger this presents to us all.

    image from Wolff’s Twitter feed, citing the Hollywood Reporter

    There is zero chance that the Republican Party will allow their sitting president, however damaged or corrupt he is, to be removed from office under the 25th Amendment. The best chance for his leaving office is for him to suffer a serious physical health crisis, which might force him to resign. As an older, overweight, out of shape man, this is not far-fetched. Even with a Democratically controlled Congress in January 2019, there is no guarantee that the Senate would come up with the sixty-seven votes needed to convict. The significance of this is that until Donald John Trump is removed from the presidency, by impeachment, ill-health, death, or being voted out of office in 2020, we are all at risk.

    Michael Wolff’s

    is an air-raid siren warning us all of peril, real and potential. (Wolff Hell?) It is must-read material for every American. When the GOP stands in the way of investigations into the administration, they are supporting a president who is unable to function at the needed level, a president who is uninterested in the details of governance, a president who is not in control of himself, a president who places not only himself, but the nation, and the entire world at risk. You need to know what they are protecting. It doesn’t take a stable genius to know that you should be afraid, very afraid. As Dubyah said, “That’s some weird shit.”

    Published – January 9, 2018

    Review Posted – January 12, 2018

    =============================

    The author’s

    page

    Here's a book that might come in handy -

    I came across this Huff-Po piece in my travels, after I had written the body of my review, buh-leev me. I was looking for images of the rulers of Trumpistan as GoT characters, when I came across this wonderful article by David Moye. I disagree with most of the assignments he shows, (for example, DJT is nowhere smart enough to be The Night King, or Tyrion Lanister) but had to pinch his Joffrey/Trump image for my central trope. I came up with DJT as JB on my own, before reading this, really, really. I swear. Check out the article.

    The Trump as a Super-Villain trope brought this fun series of faux comic book covers -

    on Looper.com

    Just in case you missed the link in the body of the review, you ABSOLUTELY MUST SEE this video, from

    -

    A response from

    to Trump’s attempt to stop publication of

    On Thursday, January 11, 2018, as I was preparing this review, the Washington Post printed a story that was alarming in the usual way,

    . Even if a person thinks in such an ignorant and bigoted way, and Swamp Thing clearly does, how addled do you have to be to allow yourself to speak such a thing aloud in a quotable venue? It is amazing he has any toes left given how many times he has shot himself in the foot. And tomorrow it will be another daily outrage.

    1/13/18 - NY Times -

    - Christopher Buckley's delicious comparison of Swamp Thing with a Roman Emperor of low repute - Can

    be far behind?

    1/17/18 - NY Magazine -

    - by Adam K. Raymond

  • Kevin Kelsey

    This book doesn't challenge your assumptions. If it is to be believed, the day-to-day functioning of Trump’s White House appears to be simultaneously worse than we all imagined, and exactly as we all thought it probably was: Trump’s an idiot, the least self-aware person alive, interested only in his own celebrity and validation, and wholly unqualified to be the President of anything. Everyone around him is 1) Trying to save face. 2) Pushing their competing agendas. 3) Making fun of Trump. 4) Sta

    This book doesn't challenge your assumptions. If it is to be believed, the day-to-day functioning of Trump’s White House appears to be simultaneously worse than we all imagined, and exactly as we all thought it probably was: Trump’s an idiot, the least self-aware person alive, interested only in his own celebrity and validation, and wholly unqualified to be the President of anything. Everyone around him is 1) Trying to save face. 2) Pushing their competing agendas. 3) Making fun of Trump. 4) Stabbing each other in the back. 5) Pulling their hair out. 6) Trying to avoid jail time. 7) Competing for Trump’s attention. 8) Trying to reign Trump in. 9) Trying not to get fired. 10) Trying to get everyone else fired. 11) Failing miserably at everything they do, because they themselves are wholly inept, and generally awful humans.

    All things considered, it was a surprisingly compassionate portrayal of everyone involved. It’s the blind leading the blind leading us all off a cliff.

    P.S. Pence is mostly absent from the book, which makes it seem like he’s just sitting on the sidelines, twirling his thumbs, waiting for the moment he can step in and become President.

  • Stephanie *Very Stable Genius*

    **Knock knock** Uh… hello? Mr. *president? I’m sorry to just walk in to the oval office, but no one was at the desk and the door was wide open. Should that be?

    Trump: “Yeah, I have trouble finding people willing to work for me, so I just leave the door open and let people wander in. Who are you? I hope you’re not from CNN.”

    “No sir. My name is Michael Wolff, I’m an author and I want to write a book about you, your administration, and your first year in office. The working title is “The Great Trans

    **Knock knock** Uh… hello? Mr. *president? I’m sorry to just walk in to the oval office, but no one was at the desk and the door was wide open. Should that be?

    Trump: “Yeah, I have trouble finding people willing to work for me, so I just leave the door open and let people wander in. Who are you? I hope you’re not from CNN.”

    “No sir. My name is Michael Wolff, I’m an author and I want to write a book about you, your administration, and your first year in office. The working title is “The Great Transition: The first 100 Days of the Trump Adiministration”, yeah, that’s the ticket ….hey, have you lost weight? You look amazing!”

    “I do look amazing. I’m the most amazing looking *president of all time…. Everyone says so. Come in and sit on the couch and never leave. I like you because you like me. You have the best taste. Here, have a laminated electoral map of the United states, see all the red? So much red, I won bigly.”

    Wolff: “Thank you sir, I’m sure the red has nothing to do with mostly empty landmass.”

    Trump: “Let me introduce you to the cast….um…. the people who work for me. Don’t ask me what they do, because I’m not sure what they do. This is my son in law, Jared Kushner. He’s going to bring peace to the Middle East because he’s Jewish. It’s a done deal!”

    Wolff: “Wow! That’s almost impossible to believe, nice to meet you Jared.”

    Jared: “……………….. Inaudible…………”

    Trump: “This is

    Ivanka, my

    daughter.”

    Wolff: (throws up in mouth a little bit) “Hi Ivanka. Do you have a position here? “

    Ivanka: “I think I’m an adviser or something. I sit here and look good and I never have an expression on my face.”

    ((Jared + Ivanka = Jarvanka. This is true.))

    Wolff: “Who’s that woman in the corner? The one sobbing and covering her face, is she okay?”

    Trump: “That’s Melania, my trophy wife. She’s been crying like that since election night.”

    Wolff: “Me too.”

    Trump: “What?”

    Wolff: “Nothing….carry on with the introductions.”

    “This is Reince Priebus. He gets me covfefe and fetches anything I tell him too.”

    Reince: “I’m the Chief of Staff to the *president. Nice to meet you, (whispers) kill me and end this please.”

    Trump: “This is Michael Flynn, he’s my ‘in’ with Putin.”

    Flynn: “Actually, I’m the National Security Adviser AND the guy in charge of the Russia stuff. How’s it going?”

    Wolff: “I’m feeling a bit nauseous, to be honest.”

    Trump: “This is Sean Spicer. He goes on TV and talks to the fake news reporters, but I don’t think he looks the part.”

    “Hi Michael. I’m the Press Secretary and it’s my job to lie outlandishly for the *president every day, and if I do a good job he won’t scream at me for hours.”

    Trump: “This is

    Hope Hicks. She’s pretty.”

    “Hello Hope, I didn’t see you down there….are you steaming the *president’s pants whilst he’s in them?”

    “Yes. He enjoys it. I’m the White House Communications Director.”

    Wolff: “Really? The position Bradley Whitford played in the West Wing? …huh.”

    Hope: “Who? Well, as far as I know my job is to worship the *president, agree with everything he says, and make him feel good about himself at all times. I do my best to make sure he doesn’t hear anything negative about himself.”

    Wolff: “So you’re a feminist.”

    Hope: “What?”

    Wolff: “Nevermind.”

    Trump: “This is

    Steve Bannon.”

    “Hey there Michael, believe it or not I’m the White House Chief of Staff….. Toby from The West Wing. How are you?”

    Wolff: “Kind of regretting my life decisions at the moment. Are you wearing two shirts? Forget it… Mr. *President, do you mind if I interview, and record, everyone that comes in here?”

    Trump: “Sure! You’re a good guy because you like me. I know it’s going to be a great book. Any book about Trump is the best book! You’re only going to write nice things, right, because you like me?”

    Wolff: “But of course! Heh heh…”

    If you pay close attention to the clusterfuck that is happening in this country, nothing in this book will surprise you. If not, defiantly read it and get caught up. Most of this stuff has been reported by pundits for the last couple of years, but there is plenty in here to bring one a bit of schadenfreude, which makes it worth the read. But the best thing about the book is that it's making Trump pooh his pants.

    A couple of fun facts that I learned was the *president yells at the cleaning staff (and everyone for everything all the time) for picking up clothing that he left on the floor, stating that ‘if the shirt is on the floor it’s because that’s where he wants it.’

    He prefers fast food because he has a phobia of being poisoned. His (ir)rationale is that the McDonald's has no idea he’s showing up, so there is no chance they can plan on the poisoning. Yes, the food is poison and it kills one just as dead, only a bit slower. Don’t tell him.

    Oh, and he likes to go to bed with a cheeseburger. Go whichever direction you wish with that information. I was reminded in the comments by Susan (the other Susan), that he also insists on stripping his bed every morning instead of letting the staff do it. Why? His diet (intestinal issues?) The nighty night cheeseburger? Who can say?

    We, the citizens of the United States, are in danger. Our Democracy is in trouble. We must come out and vote for Democrats in the midterms in such numbers that the shenanigans by the republicans to keep us from voting will be unsuccessful. Make sure you’re registered now, and near Election Day. If everyone takes one other person who has never voted to the polls with them it will be more than enough to flip one, if not both houses. It’s the absolutely vital we flip them. Our lives depend on it.

    A reckoning is coming… 11-6-18. Save the date!

    *illegitimate, fake, not an actual president

  • Adam Dalva

    Kinetic, trashy, slapdash, and completely addictive. Wolff's prose is uneven but he is very good at keeping the eye moving across the page, and in this he is perhaps helped by the book's failing: this is very padded out with stuff we already know (the long profiles of Kushner, Bannon, and Conway have no revelations in them.) But the gossip is gold, though the depictions of the characters have an unfortunate tendency toward lazy meanness. I don't need a description of Bannon as "on the spectrum,"

    Kinetic, trashy, slapdash, and completely addictive. Wolff's prose is uneven but he is very good at keeping the eye moving across the page, and in this he is perhaps helped by the book's failing: this is very padded out with stuff we already know (the long profiles of Kushner, Bannon, and Conway have no revelations in them.) But the gossip is gold, though the depictions of the characters have an unfortunate tendency toward lazy meanness. I don't need a description of Bannon as "on the spectrum," I just want to read "Might he be the worst manager who ever lived? He might."

    WHAT IT TAKES, Richard Ben Cramer's recounting of the 1988 presidential election, is one of the 15 best books I've ever read, and it has what this book lacks: a zoom-out, a perspective, on America itself, and insight on the varying reasons people might run for President. In contrast, Trump is unusually absent from FIRE AND FURY, a blank spot of mysticism and derision. But the rush is fun, and that has its value. The epilogue, in which Bannon (surely the source of almost everything in here) muses about running for president himself, will stick with me. 3.51 stars.

    In case you're not interested in wading through, I've pulled out the quotes that grabbed me, and will leave them here:

    “You need a son of a bitch as your chief of staff. And you need a son of a bitch who knows Washington,” Ailes told Trump not long after the election. “You’ll want to be your own son of a bitch, but you don’t know Washington.” Ailes had a suggestion: “Speaker Boehner.” (John Boehner had been the Speaker of the House until he was forced out in a Tea Party putsch in 2011.) “Who’s that?” asked Trump."

    "Scarborough and Brzezinski said it was all still complicated, and not public, officially, but it was good and everything was getting resolved.

    “You guys should just get married,” prodded Trump.

    “I can marry you! I’m an Internet Unitarian minister,” Kushner, otherwise an Orthodox Jew, said suddenly.

    “What?” said the president. “What are you talking about? Why would they want you to marry them when I could marry them? When they could be married by the president! At Mar-a-Lago!”

    He reprimanded the housekeeping staff for picking up his shirt from the floor: “If my shirt is on the floor, it’s because I want it on the floor.” Then he imposed a set of new rules: nobody touch anything, especially not his toothbrush. (He had a longtime fear of being poisoned, one reason why he liked to eat at McDonald’s—nobody knew he was coming and the food was safely premade.) Also, he would let housekeeping know when he wanted his sheets done, and he would strip his own bed."

    “I like Flynn, he reminds me of my uncles,” said Bannon. “But that’s the problem: he reminds me of my uncles."

    Then McMaster, wearing a uniform with his silver star, came in and immediately launched into a wide-ranging lecture on global strategy. Trump was soon, and obviously, distracted, and as the lecture continued he began sulking.

    “That guy bores the shit out of me,” announced Trump after McMaster left the room. But Kushner pushed him to take another meeting with McMaster, who the next day showed up without his uniform and in a baggy suit.

    “He looks like a beer salesman,” Trump said, announcing that he would hire McMaster but didn’t want to have another meeting with him."

    "For most of the day, almost no one would know that he had decided to take matters into his own hands. In presidential annals, the firing of FBI director James Comey may be the most consequential move ever made by a modern president acting entirely on his own."

    "Moving from the cabinet room across the open area into the president’s earshot, “a loud, scary, clearly threatening” Bannon, in the Jarvanka telling, yelled, “I am going to fuck you and your little group!” with a baffled president plaintively wanting to know, “What’s going on?”

    “Look, Kasowitz has known him for twenty-five years. Kasowitz has gotten him out of all kinds of jams. Kasowitz on the campaign—what did we have, a hundred women? Kasowitz took care of all of them.” - Bannon.

  • Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at:

    When I initially posted the "review" below (based solely on leaked segments) the day before

    was officially released, I had no idea my little bit of nothing would get as much attention as it has. I also didn't really plan on reading the book. But then somehow the library decided it should order

    copies of the thing and I went from 90th on the wait list to it being my turn before even a week was over (many thanks to th

    Find all of my reviews at:

    When I initially posted the "review" below (based solely on leaked segments) the day before

    was officially released, I had no idea my little bit of nothing would get as much attention as it has. I also didn't really plan on reading the book. But then somehow the library decided it should order

    copies of the thing and I went from 90th on the wait list to it being my turn before even a week was over (many thanks to the patrons who either removed their names from the list or made a point to return the book right away so everyone could get their chance) and there was a snow day so I had no excuse not to dive right in. So what do I think now that I'm finished? Well, I think we elected fucking Fredo to run our great nation . . . .

    I stand behind everything I said before. This was indeed simply a "tell-all" as I originally believed and probably contained a "bigly" chunk of tabloid journalism (which surprisingly focused A LOT on the Bannon/Jared & Ivanka relationship). It's convenient that one of the most quoted figures in the book is Roger Ailes who is now dead. But at the end of the day does it really matter which quotes are real or who leaked what when it comes to sort of a "National Enquirer" type of bestseller? Trump said it best when he said the following about his supporters:

    If nothing else has been confirmed for me since the inauguration (aside from the fact that Trump had the biggest crowd ever in attendance *eye roll*) it is Trump's own quote above and this point that

    makes over and over and over again . . . .

    And

    is something that no one will ever be able to fix when it comes to this 71-year old man. Let's just hope America wakes up by the next election before Trump turns our country into a "shithole nation." : (

    Today our Führer is attempting to prevent this book’s release. People quoted in the book are also coming forth denying they said some of the things attributed to them. If a copy of this (literally) falls into my lap – like from the sky while I’m sitting on a park bench or something – I may read it. As for what has been leaked so far regarding its contents? All I have to say is . . . . .

    Trump didn’t think he would win the G.D. election. No one in the universe did. He put his name in the hat as a marketing ploy for his failing brand. Unfortunately for America, no one drinks the Trump Kool-Aid as well as Trump himself so once he was told there was a chance he could win he brainwashed himself into thinking he was qualified for the job.

    he sleeps in a different bedroom than Melania. Melania had ZERO intention of ever moving from her gilded penthouse in Trump Tower until the powers that be told her she was obligated to for the sake of public appearance. It’s not like she really hides her distaste when it comes to her husband . . . .

    Rupert Murdoch called him a “fucking idiot.” HE IS ONE. I guarantee Tillerson called him a moron too.

    he is so delusional he believes someone would poison him. Hell, it’s probably someone in his own family … or someone who married into his family only to be used as a patsy.

    he hates the Obamas. Every single move he’s made since being elected is an attempt to delete Obama’s footprint from the history books. At this point one could only be thankful if the reasoning behind Trump’s disdain is because they were “very arrogant” rather than because The Donald wears a white robe and hood around Mar-A-Largo on the weekends.

    Ivanka has her eye set on being the first female president. It’s pretty obvious at this point the Trumps like to fancy themselves as a new and not-so-improved version of the Kennedy clan.

    Trump doesn’t read or “really even skim,” but instead engrosses himself in television viewing in order to see just how “fake” the news is that day in order to be able to Twat about it while taking his 3:00 a.m. constitutional every night after his handlers have retired to their beds. Is it really surprising Trump isn't a big reader? He is, after all, the dude who has “the best words” such as . . . .

    Steve Bannon used him . . . .

    Once again

    You were the only one stupid enough to believe a fucking white supremacist had the best interest of the country at heart.

    everyone who works in the White House right now hates everyone else. Kelly hates everyone most of all. Thank Jeebus he loves this country enough to keep trying to stomp out the dumpster fire which is this presidency with his bare feet every day.

    Was I the only person who equated this release to a Kitty Kelley sort “unauthorized biography????” Now, thanks to Trump and his merry band of minions – along with their cease and desist demands, this is sure to be a bestseller . . . .

  • Roxane

    This book was hilarious and terrifying and confirmed pretty much everything most of us have suspected about the incompetence of the Trump administration. If even half of this book is true, well, this presidency is a disaster.

    The strangest part of this book is Wolf’s unabashed affection for Steve Bannon. Like, dude, get a room.

    Also this book is sloppy and needs to be edited.

  • Emily May

    Spoiler: Donald Trump is incompetent and misogynistic.

    Well, I couldn’t help myself, could I? This book is causing such a stir that I just had to read it. I can't let that controversial bandwagon just pass me by. Having read it, though, I have to say I'm surprised that it's causing such a stir at all. There's very little here that people don't already know about Trump, Bannon, Kushner and Russia.

    I guess maybe I can see the value in putting together an overview of the Trump campaign and

    Spoiler: Donald Trump is incompetent and misogynistic.

    Well, I couldn’t help myself, could I? This book is causing such a stir that I just had to read it. I can't let that controversial bandwagon just pass me by. Having read it, though, I have to say I'm surprised that it's causing such a stir at all. There's very little here that people don't already know about Trump, Bannon, Kushner and Russia.

    I guess maybe I can see the value in putting together an overview of the Trump campaign and presidency, but unfortunately this book is also poorly-written, contains no references, and reads a little bit like, um, fake news. Sorry to say it. What it contains in new material - such as snatches of conversations, and the true feelings of Trump & Co. - is written in an

    , without anything to back it up.

    I can understand why even Trump’s toughest critics have had some doubts about this book. Wolff writes things it seems he couldn’t possibly know without explaining why he does, in fact, know them (who overheard that thing that Bannon said? How can he say what Trump is thinking in a particular moment?). I know a lot of it had to be anonymous, but he often expresses the feelings of individuals, even Trump himself, on certain matters without saying how he knows it (not even so much as “an insider told me…”).

    There are many hard-working journalists who have written fantastic, well-researched critiques of Trump and his presidency. These articles fill me with such satisfaction because they are a perfect contrast to Trump’s ranting, tweeting nonsense, but Wolff instead prefers to play the Trump game. His book seems written with the intention of being as provocative and antagonistic as possible. It evokes emotions, but adds little to the discussion.

    . Characteristic of our times - and this presidency in particular - the book feels gossipy, based around emotions and talking the loudest, instead of being convincing and analytical, backed up by solid references that we can factcheck.

    I am critical of Trump because, among many other things, he constantly says and tweets baseless accusations and theories that are meant to incite a passionate response. But that's exactly what

    does, too.

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  • Sylvester Olson

    I never planned on reading this. But now that Donald Trump is trying to prevent its release, it's now the highest priority on my reading list.

  • Manny

    Donald Trump has loudly complained that he would be able to sue the author of

    , were it not for the fact that US libel law is so weak. I thought I would look a few things up.

    According to

    , libel law is indeed less plaintiff-friendly in the US than in most countries. In particular, truth is an absolute defense, i.e. true statements cannot be defamatory. However, if

    does contain false and defamatory statements, it seems to me that Trump would have de

    Donald Trump has loudly complained that he would be able to sue the author of

    , were it not for the fact that US libel law is so weak. I thought I would look a few things up.

    According to

    , libel law is indeed less plaintiff-friendly in the US than in most countries. In particular, truth is an absolute defense, i.e. true statements cannot be defamatory. However, if

    does contain false and defamatory statements, it seems to me that Trump would have decent prospects of winning a case. It would be necessary to prove "actual malice", namely "knowledge that the information was false" or that it was published "with reckless disregard of whether it was false or not", and also that the allegations or imputations were "injurious to another in their trade, business, or profession". Since Wolff has openly said that he isn't sure of all his facts, and hopes his book will eventually force Trump to resign, I'd guess there would be a good case on both scores. For example, with respect to "injurious to another in their trade, business, or profession", the book has already been cited by governments unfriendly to the US, e.g. North Korea and Iran, as proof that Trump is mentally incompetent.

    Another interesting piece of evidence,

    is that Trump's cease-and-desist letter failed to identify any factually false or defamatory statements. I think the problem, from Trump's point of view, is simple: most or all of the book is in fact true.

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