This Is Not a Spectacle

This Is Not a Spectacle

The extended version of This Is Not a Spectacle explores human curiosity towards strangers and investigates where curiosity becomes fascination with another’s grief or misfortune from afar. The poems range from my experiences of a car accident, my own fascination of others and strangers’ impressions of me. It is an expression of anger from those who least want to be stared...

DownloadRead Online
Title:This Is Not a Spectacle
Author:Isabelle Charlotte Kenyon
Rating:
Edition Language:English

This Is Not a Spectacle Reviews

  • Bianca Bowers

    I discovered Isabelle Kenyon's poetry on Twitter, and I'm glad that I did.

    In her chapbook, 'This is not a Spectacle', Miss Kenyon takes the reader on a poetic journey into the social ills that plague the private and public spaces in modern society.

    From the street children in Mumbai with "balloon stomachs", to the slave labour in a sweat shop where a "friendly face" becomes a "dollar sign", to the homeless whose signs and pleas are ignored by the more fortunate, and behind closed doors, into do

    I discovered Isabelle Kenyon's poetry on Twitter, and I'm glad that I did.

    In her chapbook, 'This is not a Spectacle', Miss Kenyon takes the reader on a poetic journey into the social ills that plague the private and public spaces in modern society.

    From the street children in Mumbai with "balloon stomachs", to the slave labour in a sweat shop where a "friendly face" becomes a "dollar sign", to the homeless whose signs and pleas are ignored by the more fortunate, and behind closed doors, into domestic violence, where "black pints cloud his vision".

    The "Me Too" campaign is also given a voice in Section Six (the final section), aptly titled "Don't Stare at Me -- Don't Judge Me." My favourite lines from this section are:

    "You try to claim my body for your own

    with roving eyes.

    I’ve worn my coat to hide my breasts –

    nonetheless,

    you stare regardless."

    Overall, I enjoyed this book and look forward to watching this young poet evolve in the future.

  • Julia Cirignano

    Touch, feel, smell, and experience Isabelle Kenyon’s poetry. Within this collection, Kenyon is observant and confessional. While analyzing other people’s weaknesses and the way they give into societal norms, she also explores her own insecurities, which makes the reader like her. As a reader, I was interested in the person she is just as much as I was interested in her poetry.

    This modern collection of poetry highlights many current trends such as social media, without being cliché. She points o

    Touch, feel, smell, and experience Isabelle Kenyon’s poetry. Within this collection, Kenyon is observant and confessional. While analyzing other people’s weaknesses and the way they give into societal norms, she also explores her own insecurities, which makes the reader like her. As a reader, I was interested in the person she is just as much as I was interested in her poetry.

    This modern collection of poetry highlights many current trends such as social media, without being cliché. She points out flaws in social media trends, but commiserates with lines such as, “virtual reality more satisfying than your own.”

    I really enjoyed Kenyon’s metaphors that made me think. She uses comparisons and similes that seemed a bit random, but I like that she was thinking out of the box. I also really enjoyed what Kenyon left out. For example, her poem “Car Park Scene” says just enough. She leaves her readers wanting more, but in a good way. This also happens in “Me Too: Spoken Word”, a truly moving poem.

    I also really enjoyed Kenyon’s choice to not focus solely on lthe typical love story within this collection. She talks about train rides with strangers, homeless people, interracial relationships, his grandmother’s death, and much, much more.

    If I had one criticism it would be to take out the sections. They didn’t seem to correspond with the poems all the time, so maybe turning them into poems themselves would make the book flow a bit better.

    Besides that, I absolutely loved this book! Check of some of my favorite lines below.

    “Close knit communities mapped out by rivers of running raw sewage where/Corpse children with balloon stomachs play with dusty dogs-”

    “Who are we?/We are drink, we are music; we are pretending, we are stumbling, we are lost-/In the dark we are only teenage hunger.”

  • Eden Sleepwalker

    In “This Is Not a Spectacle” the poet embarks on a quiet journey, walking amongst human lives, noticing, observing.

    The lyrical persona is curious and is present; witnessing details about people that mankind is unaware of or just never takes the pain to notice. "When you want to know a stranger, when you want to feel their pain", are her exact words.

    But poet Isabelle Kenyon cares, she is not just curious to watch and she displays little stories successfully weaved into poems that bring powerful,

    In “This Is Not a Spectacle” the poet embarks on a quiet journey, walking amongst human lives, noticing, observing.

    The lyrical persona is curious and is present; witnessing details about people that mankind is unaware of or just never takes the pain to notice. "When you want to know a stranger, when you want to feel their pain", are her exact words.

    But poet Isabelle Kenyon cares, she is not just curious to watch and she displays little stories successfully weaved into poems that bring powerful, vivid images to the reader's mind. She is concerned about heart-aching humans, sensing their loneliness, their misery, their suffering and she reports them from her point of view, often with haunting words, probably the best example being "This is not a spectacle", which is also the book's title, dealing with the outsiders of our society, the homeless people.

    In another poem, she expresses her love, care, and devotion to her granny Olga, to whom the book is dedicated, a beloved person who had been there for her in the roughest times of her life.

    Overall, this one of a kind poetry collection, gives me the impression of a notebook or a diary at the poet's hands, written at the exact moment she was experiencing each event. This is the unique style of Isabelle Kenyon.

  • Katie

    This morning we are travelling into a poetry collection by Isabelle Kenyon, which is a social commentary on a number of people, and subjects - growing old, poverty, the Internet etc.

    What I loved were the sentences in the poems, which sometimes almost have the form of prose. Take this sentence for example, "goldfish gasping, inhaling cloying cotton, breath tightening like a plastic bag around your neck," That amount of description is perfect, and gave this reader beautiful imagery.

    I loved the po

    This morning we are travelling into a poetry collection by Isabelle Kenyon, which is a social commentary on a number of people, and subjects - growing old, poverty, the Internet etc.

    What I loved were the sentences in the poems, which sometimes almost have the form of prose. Take this sentence for example, "goldfish gasping, inhaling cloying cotton, breath tightening like a plastic bag around your neck," That amount of description is perfect, and gave this reader beautiful imagery.

    I loved the poems on older people too, describing care homes, and as something I can personally relate with, made me feel sad. Take this, "she wears a bright, silk scarf

    a flicker of past beauty

    Remnants of character hidden in the

    Cavities of a worm-ridden brain,"

    Homeless, which I believe was the inspiration for this chapbook, describes a homeless man fitting, instead thought to be merely drunk.

    And just when you think Kenyon might be finished her book delivers three poems Teenagers at a Bus Stop, Raised by the Internet, and HAIR, which are all brilliant poems, and shows what poetry can do best, hold up a mirror to our own lives, and shine the truths of our world.

    I'm giving this four footballs because, to use a footballing term, many of the poems are absolute screamers and have you on your feet applauding, or in my case reaching for a pen to write my own poetry. I wouldn't give this five because the book does feel incomplete, and as Kenyon has extended this chapbook I'm sure that will remedy that.

    Reviewed on my blog @flyingthroughthepages

  • Ashley Jean

    This collection of poems captivated me from the first section's lines: "when you want to know a stranger..."

    Kenyon introduces us to a range of people (from young teenagers to the homeless) throughout the collections' six sections. She offers her thoughts as a passenger, a pedestrian, a granddaughter, and herself. With each new section, the reader is introduced to new settings as well. All of these individual elements come together seamlessly to create a refreshing commentary on human existence.

    T

    This collection of poems captivated me from the first section's lines: "when you want to know a stranger..."

    Kenyon introduces us to a range of people (from young teenagers to the homeless) throughout the collections' six sections. She offers her thoughts as a passenger, a pedestrian, a granddaughter, and herself. With each new section, the reader is introduced to new settings as well. All of these individual elements come together seamlessly to create a refreshing commentary on human existence.

    The imagery and musicality of each poem are especially worth reading. Unlike most poetry, which is usually abstract thought, Kenyon's voice is both original and accessible. Above all, her words are tangible, and can be felt in the mind and in the heart: "We are drink, we are music..."

    "Raised by the Internet" spoke to me, as I was in my later years as a teenager, raised in a digital world. "Am I like them do I fit in..." are some of my exact thoughts. Kenyon has a way of making her experiences the reader's –– a key to great poetry.

    While I have not practiced reading poetry in years, it was a pleasure reacquainting myself with the art through Kenyon's vision. I hope to read more from this poet very soon.

  • cheyenne raine

    i enjoyed this collection for various reasons, however, i feel that there was “something” missing. and, i’m not sure why it felt slightly off, but it has daily thoughts and life moments spun into every page- so it was refreshing to turn the mundane and regular things into poems. very well done!

  • Linda Hill

    All of society is laid bare in the poems of This is not a Spectacle.

    I really enjoyed reading this anthology. I wouldn’t say that the imagery and syntax are polished and refined, but that is the appeal of these poems. Isabelle Kenyon writes with a raw honesty that conveys true emotion and belief.

    The different sections explore the underside of humanity and identity, frequently raising the issue of how we mis-treat others in society, from the bullying of someone because of their name, through mixed

    All of society is laid bare in the poems of This is not a Spectacle.

    I really enjoyed reading this anthology. I wouldn’t say that the imagery and syntax are polished and refined, but that is the appeal of these poems. Isabelle Kenyon writes with a raw honesty that conveys true emotion and belief.

    The different sections explore the underside of humanity and identity, frequently raising the issue of how we mis-treat others in society, from the bullying of someone because of their name, through mixed race relationships and the depersonalisation of the elderly in care homes to the violence of sexual abuse so that any reader can find a poem to make them think, to question their beliefs and to consider their own attitudes and positions. This is not a Spectacle is very much an anthology that feels personal to the poet, Isabelle Kenyon, but at the same time is no less resonant to the reader.

    I found the poems set in India fascinating and will return to them after my visit there later in next year to see if they match my personal reflections. I especially loved the poem Identity – Granny Olga, particularly the last two lines as I felt they conveyed such love and optimism. I was curious throughout about the title This is not a Spectacle and when it became clear at the end of Letter To My Younger Self I almost punched the air in triumphant affirmation. This is a poem all young people could benefit from. There is quite an abrasive undertone to many of the poems, with quite a feminist perspective that I think will enlighten many readers too, especially those poems with quite strong expletive language or a quite disjointed physical structure on the page that reflects the subject matter.

    This is not a Spectacle is an interesting and insightful collection that considers humanity from many angles. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

  • Nicole Field

    This is a review for the original, non-extended version of this collection (which doesn't seem to have its own page for reviews). I've got a shelf for poetry I read, and I can say that this collection was completely unlike any of the other collections on that shelf.

    The blurb itself speaks to a fascination with strangers, and that is exactly what you get for most of this collection. Honestly, I found some of the individual poems to be quite confronting, difficult, to read. But I wouldn't say the

    This is a review for the original, non-extended version of this collection (which doesn't seem to have its own page for reviews). I've got a shelf for poetry I read, and I can say that this collection was completely unlike any of the other collections on that shelf.

    The blurb itself speaks to a fascination with strangers, and that is exactly what you get for most of this collection. Honestly, I found some of the individual poems to be quite confronting, difficult, to read. But I wouldn't say they are not important or that. I would instead argue they are more important because of that feeling discomfort.

    I liked the repetition of 'This is not a spectacle' within the poems a couple of times, in differing ways. It really connected the title to the collection.

    For me personally, I most liked the poetry that came towards the end. The last half dozen or so poems seemed to come from a more personal place of the author, including a letter to her younger self, one about hair, and a poem naming her Granny Olga.

  • Helen

    The imagery in this collection was really strong and unique. Overall, the style was clear and easy to read, with great use of language. I liked the overall concept of exploring society's voyeuristic nature and the way that we ogle at people's misfortune; it's something I think we should all be thinking about. There was also a good range in tone; I particularly enjoyed 'The Man with the Unfortunate Name', which was funny in a quiet sort of way.

    The imagery in this collection was really strong and unique. Overall, the style was clear and easy to read, with great use of language. I liked the overall concept of exploring society's voyeuristic nature and the way that we ogle at people's misfortune; it's something I think we should all be thinking about. There was also a good range in tone; I particularly enjoyed 'The Man with the Unfortunate Name', which was funny in a quiet sort of way.

    Unfortunately, although this was a powerful collection I didn't entirely connect with it. I felt as though I was being held at arm's length. That might have been the intention, to maintain the reader's identity as a bystander, someone looking in from the outside without fully understanding the big picture. However, I felt it was lacking some clarity for me which would definitely have improved my enjoyment of it.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.