Lances All Alike

Lances All Alike

Modernist poet-painters Mina Loy and Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven had many friends in common (including Djuna Barnes and Marcel Duchamp), yet there is no record that the two ever met. Their non-relationship presents a curious “absent presence” in modernist history.Zelazo weaves lines of poetry by both women into an imaginary conversation, exploring the way their w...

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Title:Lances All Alike
Author:Suzanne Zelazo
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Edition Language:English

Lances All Alike Reviews

  • Michelle Kidwell

    Lances All Alike

    by Suzanne Zelazo

    Coach House Books

    Poetry

    Pub Date 05 Apr 2018

    I am reviewing a copy of Lances All Alike through Coach House Books and Netgalley:

    Despite the fact there is no proof that modernist poet painters Mina Loy and Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven ever became friends with one another they did have friends in common, Susan Zelazo uses lines of poetry to create imagined conversations between the two women.

    This book allows you to get a glimpse at what a conversation between

    Lances All Alike

    by Suzanne Zelazo

    Coach House Books

    Poetry

    Pub Date 05 Apr 2018

    I am reviewing a copy of Lances All Alike through Coach House Books and Netgalley:

    Despite the fact there is no proof that modernist poet painters Mina Loy and Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven ever became friends with one another they did have friends in common, Susan Zelazo uses lines of poetry to create imagined conversations between the two women.

    This book allows you to get a glimpse at what a conversation between these two modernist poet painters and women would be like, through the poems Suzanne Zelazo put together.

    I give Lances Are All Alike five out of five stars!

    Happy Reading!

  • Joseph

    Lances All Alike by Suzanne Zelazo is a collection of modern poetry. Zelazo is a writer, editor, educator, and publisher in the visual and literary arts, as well as in sport. She holds a Ph.D. in English with a specialty in female modernism and avant-garde poetry and performance.

    Zelazo borrows for her creation. Each section is prefaced with a quote and the poems that follow in some manner reflect that quote back to the reader. I was a bit confused at the start (The notes and explanation are at t

    Lances All Alike by Suzanne Zelazo is a collection of modern poetry. Zelazo is a writer, editor, educator, and publisher in the visual and literary arts, as well as in sport. She holds a Ph.D. in English with a specialty in female modernism and avant-garde poetry and performance.

    Zelazo borrows for her creation. Each section is prefaced with a quote and the poems that follow in some manner reflect that quote back to the reader. I was a bit confused at the start (The notes and explanation are at the end of the book) but I caught on by the second section. The first section all I could think of was Gertrude Stein, and in my thoughts of Stein, the next poem I read was titled "Tiny Buttons:"

    Crushed moon

    sinuous consciousness

    congealed fantasia

    This excerpt will give the reader an idea of what the poetry is like throughout the collection. It is very much in the modernist style. In fact, all the reference quotes also are from modernists. Section two starts with a quote from Ezra Pound to James Joyce and proceeds to have an Irish tone. The third section is titled "Sutured Portraits." The final section contains a quote from Dewy Dell from the one Faulkner novel I have read As I Lay Dying. I was able to latch on to the poems and follow. Without known the novel, I would have been lost as I was in the first section.

    The notes at the end do a great deal to explain the purpose of this collection. Mina Loy and Baroness Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven were contemporaries that never met or collaborated although they had several common friends including Djuna Barnes who I have read and piqued my interest in this collection. The non-relationship between Loy and Freytag-Loringhoven is used to set the work in motion with an imagined conversation, in the modernist style. Unless the reader is familiar with and or an admirer of modernist poetry, this will be a difficult read. My limited knowledge, but a great appreciation of modernist writers and my limited ability to digest modernist poetry made this a challenging, but rewarding read. For myself, I was able to walk away a bit more knowledgeable and more motivated to dive back into modernist poetry.

    Available April 24, 2018

  • Robin Bonne

    Excision 1 was not enjoyable for me, and I nearly stopped reading. It read like Lorem Ipsum-esque word soup, but maybe I am missing something in my understanding of it. I started Excision 2, and suddenly I was reading poetry with beautiful flow. The poems became much more accessible and imaginative in the following excisions. The difference between quality was startling. I ended up having mixed feelings, but overall I would recommend.

    Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing a free co

    Excision 1 was not enjoyable for me, and I nearly stopped reading. It read like Lorem Ipsum-esque word soup, but maybe I am missing something in my understanding of it. I started Excision 2, and suddenly I was reading poetry with beautiful flow. The poems became much more accessible and imaginative in the following excisions. The difference between quality was startling. I ended up having mixed feelings, but overall I would recommend.

    Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing a free copy of this ebook.

  • Jennie

    I always like to read more Canadian writing. This was my first foray into Suzanne's work.

    A little too over my head. There was one poem that really stood out for me:

    Needlepoint

    In the flesh

    we are a century of catastrophic echoes,

    a riot of stones

    hurled against the afterglow.

    Simmer of bone on bone,

    missiles unfurled,

    rapture on our lips

    where the sutures were.

    Perhaps my watching the first two seasons of Hannibal had me favouring this one.

    Check it out!

  • Kirsty

    Suzanne Zelazo's

    sounded like an intriguing poetry collection. Some of her imagery was certainly startling and vivid, but I found the first section far too fragmented for my particular taste. It seemed as though Zelazo had put together random strings of vocabulary which had no bearing on anything else. This is evident in poems such as 'Brancusi's Golden Equinox':

    'Lopped form

    nuclear wind

    inflated crest

    the absolute act

    Hurtling clouds

    incandescent curve

    moonstruck breast'

    The poems her

    Suzanne Zelazo's

    sounded like an intriguing poetry collection. Some of her imagery was certainly startling and vivid, but I found the first section far too fragmented for my particular taste. It seemed as though Zelazo had put together random strings of vocabulary which had no bearing on anything else. This is evident in poems such as 'Brancusi's Golden Equinox':

    'Lopped form

    nuclear wind

    inflated crest

    the absolute act

    Hurtling clouds

    incandescent curve

    moonstruck breast'

    The poems here felt saturated, and whilst they did appeal more in later sections due to their more traditional structure, and thoughts which could actually be traced from one line to the next,

    failed to grab me. I admire what Zelazo was trying to do here, but do not feel as though the poems were as well executed, or as polished, as they could have been.

  • Margaryta

    The premise of "Lances All Alike" was unfortunately better than the collection itself. I was looking forward to seeing what Zelazo did, and although I appreciated and understood her intentions, which she details in the "Notes" section at the end, it ultimately did not shape the way I read the poems. This is a collection that doesn't entirely live up to the promised synopsis, nor does it entirely 'embody' it. The poems exist as separate entities from the idea and intentions put into them. They re

    The premise of "Lances All Alike" was unfortunately better than the collection itself. I was looking forward to seeing what Zelazo did, and although I appreciated and understood her intentions, which she details in the "Notes" section at the end, it ultimately did not shape the way I read the poems. This is a collection that doesn't entirely live up to the promised synopsis, nor does it entirely 'embody' it. The poems exist as separate entities from the idea and intentions put into them. They read more as a patchwork of wonderful but loose images. I felt Zelazo managed to capture the Dadaist approach to poetry and perhaps it is for that reason that I didn't enjoy the collection, as Dada's experimentation with language, and later Surrealism's automatic writing, which is also somewhat evoked in Zelazo's poems, are both not exactly up my alley. There were a few poems where the imagery and the 'stitched together' feeling worked because there was a thematic flow through them, but overall it was easy to breeze through "Lances All Alike" and marvel at individual snippets and still feel somehow left out upon reaching the end. Maybe if I knew more about the poetesses and their lives I would've gotten more out of Zelazo's poems, but these are the kinds of ekphrastic and experimental poems that don't entirely work on their own when separated from the theme and idea that is meant to drive them.

  • Jasmine

    Unfortunately, this book fell flat for me. I had high hopes for this work, but nothing every connected. The entire collection felt strained, as if the author was trying to make something work that simply wasn't. There wasn't anything that pulled me in as a reader or submersed me into the heart of the work. I always felt disconnected from the pieces and the author. It might be difficult to find the right audience for this book.

  • Karolane

    When I read the description of this book I was really interested. I thought that it would for sure be my cup of tea... well it wasn't. I was pretty disapointed with this book. I thought it had a lot of potential but it just fell flat for me... simply because I didn't like the poetry, It was trying to do something that it just couldn't accomplish. Poetry of form is something very hard to accomplish with skill... which this book proved in its first section. I think it could've been something good

    When I read the description of this book I was really interested. I thought that it would for sure be my cup of tea... well it wasn't. I was pretty disapointed with this book. I thought it had a lot of potential but it just fell flat for me... simply because I didn't like the poetry, It was trying to do something that it just couldn't accomplish. Poetry of form is something very hard to accomplish with skill... which this book proved in its first section. I think it could've been something good if some things were changed. It felt like the writer was trying to hard to fit in the mold of out-there modern poetry and it was not well executed.

    I've been trying to get back into poetry and this didn't help. I'm sure someone out there will LOVE this book... poetry is very subjective so you can like some poets and not others, and sometimes you like one poem of one author and nothing else... this felt like that to me.

    I applaud the attempt, but it wasn't good enough for me. I truly hoped the beautiful writing touched me more than it did.

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