To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel

To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel

A beautifully crafted graphic novel adaptation of Harper Lee’s beloved, Pulitzer prize–winning American classic."Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird."A haunting portrait of race and class, innocence and injustice, hypocrisy and heroism, tradition and transformation in the Deep South of the 1930s, Harper Lee’s T...

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Title:To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel
Author:Fred Fordham
Rating:
Edition Language:English

To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel Reviews

  • Julie

    To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel is a 2018 Harper publication.

    I’m not going to review the plot of

    , but will instead offer you a review of the graphic novel version of the beloved classic.

    I am new to the graphic novel category and am still getting my sea legs, so to speak, but I have discovered one of the best ways to acclimate myself is by reading familiar stories in the graphic novel format. So far, I am having a blast re-reading a few classics and having that e

    To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel is a 2018 Harper publication.

    I’m not going to review the plot of

    , but will instead offer you a review of the graphic novel version of the beloved classic.

    I am new to the graphic novel category and am still getting my sea legs, so to speak, but I have discovered one of the best ways to acclimate myself is by reading familiar stories in the graphic novel format. So far, I am having a blast re-reading a few classics and having that experience enhanced by graphic art or drawings, depicting the scenes in the book.

    One of my initial concerns was for the respect of the material, especially when we are talking about one of the most cherished books ever written. I was equal parts skeptical and excited. I initially thought it was a cool idea, but, I worried that it might somehow reduce the impact of the story.

    However, the artwork is simply wonderful! Lovely and detailed, colorized illustrations capture the essence of the novel, and will appeal to anyone who loves the story, but will certainly entice younger readers to read this important story, without thinking of it as homework.

    I soon forgot my skepticism and reacquainted myself with this story all over again, enjoying it anew in a fresh and revitalized way.

    There are many ways to enjoy stories and every one of them are valid and useful. Graphic novels are one more way to enjoy books and I’m very pleased to have discovered, and approached it with an open mind, this format, which gives me an even deeper appreciation for classic or familiar stories, but also brings new and imaginative ones to my attention, broadening my scope of learning and entertainment.

  • Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)

    should need no introduction.  It is an American classic and arguably the most important work in American literature in the 20th century.

    I was thrilled to learn that it was being adapted into a graphic novel, which could make the story more accessible to young readers by combining visual art and language to share this enduring story.

    The story of a black man wrongly accused of a crime by a white woman in the Deep South of the 1930's and the neighborhood legend of a man named

    should need no introduction.  It is an American classic and arguably the most important work in American literature in the 20th century.

    I was thrilled to learn that it was being adapted into a graphic novel, which could make the story more accessible to young readers by combining visual art and language to share this enduring story.

    The story of a black man wrongly accused of a crime by a white woman in the Deep South of the 1930's and the neighborhood legend of a man named Boo who never leaves his house are both compelling pieces of the tale surrounding the Finch family.  

    With the perfect innocence of childhood, Scout and Jem Finch navigate their small town of Maycomb that is starkly divided by race and class.  While most adults seem to believe these are complicated topics, Scout and Jem are learning right and wrong from their father, Atticus Finch, who has a wise way of imparting his values and beliefs without imposing them on his children.

    is a frequently challenged or banned book due to its content and language.  For me, it is an accurate and heartbreaking portrayal of a time period in the American South told with unflinching honesty through the innocence of a child.  It is timeless story that explores the complexities of human nature and the brutal injustices in our history.

     is an excellent adaptation that remains true to the story by faithfully following the plot of the novel (though obviously a condensed version) with many direct quotes and bright, emotive illustrations.  This is a perfect way to introduce young people to Harper Lee's classic novel and hopefully capture their hearts and minds and open a discussion on the many heavy but necessary subjects tackled in the story.

    Many thanks to Harper Collins and Edelweiss for providing me with a DRC in exchange for my honest review.  

    is scheduled for release on October 30, 2018.

    For more full reviews, visit

  • Kelly Hager

    I'm just going to discuss the adaptation as a graphic novel, because hopefully by now, you've all read it. (If not, please read it. It's amazing.)

    I'm not really a huge fan of graphic novels, although I've tried to be. There are great ones, and there are a bunch that I've loved, but by and large, I prefer books with prose and without pictures. I was also incredibly skeptical about the need to release arguably the greatest American novel as a graphic novel. It doesn't need a gimmick to get people

    I'm just going to discuss the adaptation as a graphic novel, because hopefully by now, you've all read it. (If not, please read it. It's amazing.)

    I'm not really a huge fan of graphic novels, although I've tried to be. There are great ones, and there are a bunch that I've loved, but by and large, I prefer books with prose and without pictures. I was also incredibly skeptical about the need to release arguably the greatest American novel as a graphic novel. It doesn't need a gimmick to get people to read it; it's phenomenal by itself.

    I said that to say this: This adaptation is fantastic. The illustrations are sharp and everyone looks as they're described in the novel. (Which is to say that no, Atticus doesn't really look like Gregory Peck.)

    This is a fantastic version and if you know someone who hasn't read TKAM, this could be a good gateway. I think a lot of people may be uneasy about reading something that seems like homework if that's all they know about it. Graphic novels are a lot less intimidating. (I don't mean that to sound snobby and yes, I know there are a lot of excellent graphic novels.)

    Highly recommended in any form.

  • Paul

    This graphic novel is a perfect complement and homage to the novel, and much closer to the original manuscript than the classic film. It is in no way a replacement, but an adaptation that should make both English teachers and students very happy.

    For the full review:

    For all my reviews:

  • Kayleigh

    This book is a must have for any fans of To Kill A Mockingbird.

    The illustrations are gorgeous and the story as compelling as ever and I very much enjoyed reading it!

    Thank you to Windmill Books for kindly sending me a copy, I loved it and it’s getting a proud place on my shelf!

  • Rebecca

    To my surprise, I’ve actually rated this higher than Harper Lee’s original; I’d attribute that to the fact that I read the novel in high school and haven’t reread it since then, so I tend to associate it with boring essay assignments and a sense of duty. I’m also surprised by how little I remembered of the plot from the book or the Gregory Peck movie, such that there were a few moments here that actually made me gasp. Fordham’s version is highly faithful, including plenty of direct quotes from t

    To my surprise, I’ve actually rated this higher than Harper Lee’s original; I’d attribute that to the fact that I read the novel in high school and haven’t reread it since then, so I tend to associate it with boring essay assignments and a sense of duty. I’m also surprised by how little I remembered of the plot from the book or the Gregory Peck movie, such that there were a few moments here that actually made me gasp. Fordham’s version is highly faithful, including plenty of direct quotes from the book, and the artwork is very effective. My only gripe would be that I think Scout looks a bit too old at times, more of a preteen than a tomboy. Look out for the mockingbird on the fence on three pages. (What do you want to bet high school students will start reading this instead of the full novel?! In all honesty, if it gets them engaged in the story and characters in a way they wouldn’t be otherwise, that’s no bad thing in my opinion.)

    : (Atticus to Scout) “Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us not to try to win.”

  • Tucker (The Library Reader)

    I really, really enjoyed this! I loved the original book and it was so so cool to see it as a graphic novel. The drawings are amazing and the color is perfect. The story is just as funny and great as it was originally.

    View my review of To Kill A Mockingbird

    Thank you so much Harper Collins for an Advanced Reader's Copy!

  • Melissa

    This is a very lovely adaptation of Harper Lee's novel. The colors and art are best when it's not dark (i.e. the walk home after the Maycomb pageant as a ham was really murky). There are some sections where certain angles or characters owe a huge debt to the TKAM movie.

    What I found missing was all the "local color" that comes through in Scout's internal monologue about Maycomb and all its goings on, good and bad. It gets shoe-horned in rather awkwardly at times when it's not cut entirely (like,

    This is a very lovely adaptation of Harper Lee's novel. The colors and art are best when it's not dark (i.e. the walk home after the Maycomb pageant as a ham was really murky). There are some sections where certain angles or characters owe a huge debt to the TKAM movie.

    What I found missing was all the "local color" that comes through in Scout's internal monologue about Maycomb and all its goings on, good and bad. It gets shoe-horned in rather awkwardly at times when it's not cut entirely (like, where is the little tidbit that Dill's shirt and pants buttoned together?).

  • Andrea

    I think it's assumed, rightfully, that this is a review of the graphic novel and not of

    itself. Just wanted to make that clear!

    First, the things I loved: the cover art is lovely and symbolic and the book is beautifully bound with thick paper and a spine that bends without cracking. I know other book geeks will appreciate these things! It feels substantial in your hands.

    Now, the things I didn't love. First, I didn't love that Ford chose to move around scenes to follow or pr

    I think it's assumed, rightfully, that this is a review of the graphic novel and not of

    itself. Just wanted to make that clear!

    First, the things I loved: the cover art is lovely and symbolic and the book is beautifully bound with thick paper and a spine that bends without cracking. I know other book geeks will appreciate these things! It feels substantial in your hands.

    Now, the things I didn't love. First, I didn't love that Ford chose to move around scenes to follow or precede other scenes in a way that is inconsistent with the original. Second, the illustrations, while tinted in a lovely shade and sharply drawn, left a lot to be desired in terms of conveying emotion. Nearly all of the humor, of which there is plenty in the novel, has failed to be translated to the page. I am sure that humor is one of the most difficult emotions to play out in a graphic novel, but that emotion is so important to the story. In addition, some of the characters are difficult to tell apart much of the time (Dill and Jem, for instance) and others look just like the actors who play them in the movie (Heck Tate, for sure.)

    If this graphic novel gets people to pick up and read this story where the original book has not, then it's a victory. However, this just didn't feel like it was necessary for this particular book and actually ended up taking away a lot of important emotional elements of the original. As a teacher who reads this book with my students every year, it is something that I might use as a supplement here and there, but would never replace the original text with this.

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