I Know You Know

I Know You Know

From author Gilly Macmillan comes this original, chilling and twisty mystery about two shocking murder cases twenty years apart, and the threads that bind them.Twenty years ago, eleven-year-olds Charlie Paige and Scott Ashby were murdered in the city of Bristol, their bodies dumped near a dog racing track. A man was convicted of the brutal crime, but decades later, questio...

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Title:I Know You Know
Author:Gilly Macmillan
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Edition Language:English

I Know You Know Reviews

  • Marianne

    I Know You Know is the second stand-alone novel by NYT best-selling British author, Gilly Macmillan. Early in 2017, Detective Inspector John Fletcher is called to an excavation site where bones have been discovered. He and his partner, DC Danny Fryer note that it’s very near the place where they found two missing boys, victims of a fatal beating, just over twenty years earlier. For those murders, Sidney Noyce, an intellectually disabled man, went to prison, but there’s been a recent spate of int

    I Know You Know is the second stand-alone novel by NYT best-selling British author, Gilly Macmillan. Early in 2017, Detective Inspector John Fletcher is called to an excavation site where bones have been discovered. He and his partner, DC Danny Fryer note that it’s very near the place where they found two missing boys, victims of a fatal beating, just over twenty years earlier. For those murders, Sidney Noyce, an intellectually disabled man, went to prison, but there’s been a recent spate of interest, with a newspaper article and an ongoing podcast questioning his guilt.

    The podcast, titled “It’s Time To Tell”, has been created by Cody Swift, a close friend of the two murdered boys, who himself narrowly escaped their fate. Cody has decided to remind the public of the tragic events during that hot summer of 1996, in the hope that someone will remember some vital thing that leads to the truth. The proximity of the bodies could raise questions about a possible connection between the murders, but DI Fletcher is confident that his conviction of Sidney Noyce in 1996 will stand. It does appear, though, that not everyone wants the public’s attention on this.

    Macmillan uses three narrative strands to tell the story, two of these also featuring flashbacks to the events of 1996. The podcast strand consists of transcripts of interviews both past and present, with parents, police, lawyers, neighbours and friends, as well as transcripts of the 999 call made at the time, and Cody Swift’s own commentary about the events and those involved. The perspectives of DI Fletcher and one of the mothers, Jess Paige, complete the picture.

    This is a cleverly constructed tale, and Macmillan touches on several topics including the difficulties faced by teenaged single mothers, in particular those in reduced circumstances without the support of parents or friends, and where self-interest can often overshadow the welfare of children. She also demonstrates how ambition and laziness can lead to unethical policing. Her characters are complex and multi-faceted, and none is quite as they first appear. This is another excellent British crime thriller, full of twists and red herrings, that will keep the reader guessing until the final pages.

  • Judy Collins

    The talented and international bestselling author, Gilly Macmillan returns following

    (Jim Clemo #2) with an unputdownable multi-layered standalone thriller with a “killer” plot twist–

     5 Stars +++

     

    stirs up new evidence in a twenty-year decades-old murder with an explosive ending you will not see coming!    For fans of unsolved mysteries and the popular podcast,

    as well as Harlan Coben’s

    The talented and international bestselling author, Gilly Macmillan returns following

    (Jim Clemo #2) with an unputdownable multi-layered standalone thriller with a “killer” plot twist–

     5 Stars +++

     

    stirs up new evidence in a twenty-year decades-old murder with an explosive ending you will not see coming!    For fans of unsolved mysteries and the popular podcast,

    as well as Harlan Coben’s

    (a favorite). 

    there are twenty different kinds of true-crime podcasts: episodic, serialized, cold cases, current events, historical, and thematic. Some of these are similar, to

    and some are wildly different, both in topic and method, but they are all the kind of true crime podcast that will leave you questioning the human psyche, social relationships, and the legal system.

    is a perfect example and will feed your true crime obsession. A twenty-year-old cold case. Read it, and you will find out why!   In part, due to the author’s brilliant and clever crime writing.  

    by juggling narrators and the timing of the two cases, as well as using the podcast episodes and distinct voices to connect past with the present to the

    an estate at night near an old Greyhound racing dog track.

    (Some of my friends have adopted the retired Greyhounds).

    A group of friends at play. Kids are always in the wrong place at the wrong time.  From a decades-old brutal murder of two young boys, abandoned on wasteland.  Still a mystery years later.  Now an award-winning

    haunted by the murder of his two best friends, returns to Bristol to find out what really happened.

    Scott Ashby (age 11) and Charlie Paige (age 10) were beaten to death in Bristol, England in 1996.

    - a mentally challenged adult, was charged with the murder.  He spent time with the boys at the dog track kennels on the morning before Scott and Charlie disappeared.  He was a 24 yr. old man at the time with the mental age of a 10 yr. old boy. A boy in a man’s body. No prior criminal record.  He was likable by many.  The gentle giant. Did he receive a fair trial?

    In 2017, he commits suicide in prison, after twenty years.    He was serving a life sentence. However, he never stopped proclaiming his innocence.  

    (Dishlicker Podcast) entitled, “It’s Time To Tell.”  You see, not everyone believes Sidney Noyce was guilty.  Was he a sitting duck? There were also the detectives and the parents.   

     Everyone is hiding secrets.  Many pieces to the puzzle.  A complex chain of events. The thought of Noyce being innocent intrigued Cody.  

    He begins a personal investigation into the murders of his best friends.  He starts from the beginning with

    Episode I – Three Deaths and an Article and ends with Episode 11 – Wrong Time, Wrong Place.  He has a knack for storytelling.

    How would you feel if things changed twenty years later, to have it unearthed once again?  This opens up emotions and conflicted feelings.  

    and his guilt that he survived is a darkness he has lived with. Digging up the past will not be easy, but if the reporter is correct that Noyce did not kill his friends, then someone needs to solve this mystery.  

    For those still remembering and struggling with the darkness – It’s time to tell. Charlie was still alive when he was found and the last word he said was “ghost”.  

    However, there are some who do not want this double murder investigation stirred up again. One being

    Charlie’s mother (loads of doubt here) and suspicions, who turns to wealthy Felix Abernathy (he has always done favors for those people who need those favors to remain a secret) - to try and stop Cody’s probing. He became very useful to some very influential people in Bristol.  

    Jess has married since the murder of Nick.  Jess has hidden the past from her daughter, Erica.  “Cody Swift has lit a stick of dynamite that could blow everything in her life to smithereens. She knows already that his podcast could be a new and dark dawn in her life.” Lots of hidden dark secrets. But, why?  

    Detective Supt. Howard Smail, whose career was ended by the case and D.I. John Fletcher, who originally built the case against Sidney.  What about the powerful man, Felix —What is he hiding?  

    After the violence of Cody’s best friends’ murders, his home and community have never felt the same again.  The brutality of the crime that ripped everything apart. Cody was the third boy in the friendship group who got away.  How could this have happened?  However, some want to keep the truth buried.  

    As Cody Swift digs deeper and his podcast episodes began to unravel the real truths—some are in great danger if certain facts come out. There is also Owen Weston, the crime reporter who mounted a crusade to convince others that Sidney Noyce was innocent. What really happened that night? Then another missing person is found dead?  Do the two cases connect? 

    Well-researched, a master of suspense, connecting past with the present, I KNOW YOU KNOW  a supercharged, complex, multilayered crime page-turner thriller, heavy on character development, cop procedural, and psychological suspense.   Highly entertaining. 

    Well done and bloody good!   Highly topical— A taut, gripping novel about the deadly secrets of the past. A real crime podcast is at the heart of

      The author takes us through the complicated lives of children to adulthood. Mistakes, regrets, betrayals, deceit, fears, secrets.  

    we see a wealth of emotions, even being years after the crime. Many different tales, opening old wounds from the past which are threatening to their lives today. From the victim’s mother, Jess, Cody, and even the detectives, among others.   

    Each character is dynamite in their own ways; however, I thought Cody and especially Jess’s characters were quite intriguing looking back from past to present.  Highly relatable characters. Readers will find an exploration into Jess’s history from a scared young mother, a dark past she would like to keep buried to keep from ruining her current life, yet she possesses the reliance and strength to go up against the worst of enemies. Jess was my favorite character.  She will keep you guessing. 

    is sure to appeal to fans of true crime and especially Harlan Coben, Linwood Barclay, Mary Kubica, Shari Lapena, and Michael Robotham (my favorites).  

    Readers of Charlie Donlea’s

    will enjoy the podcast episodes and interviews of the victims’ families, the cops, and those affected by the tragedy, as well as those who are guarding their secrets of the past.

    I loved the hot air balloons (my former hometown held an annual balloon rally) and loved the hashtag #awaitthedate.  Our dog race track here in West Palm Beach, FL is located across from the Palm Beach International Airport.  Not sure I will ever ride by again without thinking of this story. 

    Hazel Collins (the person who made the report and character in the book). Ironically, I have an aunt named Hazel Collins Lail my favorite – now age 90 in a nursing home in NC with Alzheimer's and a stroke victim.  Each time I read her name, thought of her. I also have a cousin Anabelle (Ann) Collins, deceased.  For more than 15 years Hazel has been in a home has no clue of any of her family or where she is. She was moved to hospice 20 yrs. ago to die and they had to move her out to a nursing home.  She keeps on ticking. Would love to know her secrets. 

    to enhance your reading experience, highly recommend reading listening to these interviews with Gilly: I thoroughly enjoyed 

    In her interview, you will learn many interesting facts about I KNOW YOU KNOW.  I really enjoyed how she created: ‘Dishlicker’ is a slang word for ‘greyhound’ which is why Cody chose the name for his production company. The location of the murders was real and fascinated Macmillian. She is a true-crime podcast addict and this was her most complicated book to plot to date.  (and the best, I will add). 

    Also, note the interview with Gilly and Mary Kubica (another good one).

    by CRIME READS.

    with Gilly MacMillan and Hank Garner "Stories Behind the Stories" The Author Stories Podcast. 

    A special thank you to HarperCollins and Edelweiss for an advanced reading copy of #IKnowYouKnow.  I also purchased the audiobook narrated by Steve Brand, Steve West, and Imogen Church for a

  • Mary Kubica

    Gilly Macmillan is a master when it comes to creating perfectly-plotted psychological suspense and characters with real emotion and depth. I KNOW YOU KNOW is a smart thriller that will keep readers on the edge of their seats, from the first gripping chapter all the way through to the mind-blowing finale. Add this to your to-read list.

  • DJ Sakata

    Favorite Quotes:

    If you can control where an interview takes place, you are part of the way to controlling the interview itself. Location matters. Fletcher’s wife announced she was leaving him when they were in the Costco car park. He didn’t see it coming. He remembers acutely the humiliation of loading bags into the boot of the car while she explained across the laden shopping trolley that their marriage was over. “Well, why are we buying in bulk then?” was all he could think to ask.

    It’s a rest

    Favorite Quotes:

    If you can control where an interview takes place, you are part of the way to controlling the interview itself. Location matters. Fletcher’s wife announced she was leaving him when they were in the Costco car park. He didn’t see it coming. He remembers acutely the humiliation of loading bags into the boot of the car while she explained across the laden shopping trolley that their marriage was over. “Well, why are we buying in bulk then?” was all he could think to ask.

    It’s a resting place for cold cases, and Fletcher thinks of it as an archive of failure. For every high-profile solve, there’s an unsolved crime shelved here. In each tidily filed box, Fletcher thinks, there are not just papers, photographs, and other case materials, but other things, invisible things. There are traces of the open emotional wounds an unsolved crime leaves on the families and detectives affected by it. There is also the shadow of something more rotten: the person who got away with it.

    Like a nodding dog ornament on a dashboard, she moves her head laboriously to look at Danny. Everything she does is so slow it makes Fletcher’s joints feel as if they’re liquefying under the strain of being patient.

    I said you’re a prat, John Fletcher. Always have been, always will be. I’m fed up of you strutting about like you own the place when you passed your sell-by date years ago. The only time I’ll look forward to seeing you will be at your retirement party.

    I did a bit of unscientific research on the subject—by which I mean to say that I looked it up on the internet…

    My Review:

    I was unprepared for the twists and turns of the diabolically clever Gilly Macmillan. Her fascinating yet despicable characters were as compelling as the well-crafted storylines they inhabited. They squeezed then broke my heart while holding me captive to my Kindle as I hissed and huffed my distress. No one was innocent, except for the condemned patsy, and no one was as they had initially appeared, it was brilliant.

    Gilly Macmillan has strong word voodoo. Cunningly woven into this adroitly written book were the gut-churning savagery of children, blackmail, police coercion, nefarious manipulations, greed, ambition, corruption, and desperation. The writing was exquisitely nuanced, the wily characters were deeply damaged and irreparably flawed yet keenly described and depicted in a cleverly magnetizing manner. It was riveting, yet tragic and heartbreaking. I was enthralled and even though she turned me inside out, I covet her mad skills and greedily want all her words.

    New additions to my Brit Vocab list include tearaways which Mr. Google tells me is a wild or reckless person; bung which is a bribe or payoff; and cobblers which apparently has two meanings as it is nonsense to some, and testicles to the Cockneys - although those two things are pretty much the same thing to me ;)

  • Kristy

    For twenty years, Sidney Noyce has claimed his innocence for the murders of Charlie Paige and Scott Ashby. In 1996, their bodies were found dumped by a dog track near the estate where they lived. Their friend, Cody Swift, who was ten like Charlie, lived, and now, twenty years later, is reviving the case via a podcast, It's Time to Tell. He too has his doubts about Sidney's guilt. He returns home to Bristol to start investigating. But not everyone wants this case reopened, including Charlie's mot

    For twenty years, Sidney Noyce has claimed his innocence for the murders of Charlie Paige and Scott Ashby. In 1996, their bodies were found dumped by a dog track near the estate where they lived. Their friend, Cody Swift, who was ten like Charlie, lived, and now, twenty years later, is reviving the case via a podcast, It's Time to Tell. He too has his doubts about Sidney's guilt. He returns home to Bristol to start investigating. But not everyone wants this case reopened, including Charlie's mother, Jessica, who has started a new life, with a new family. And then there's the investigating detective, John Fletcher, who found the boys. Charlie died in his arms; you don't forget a case like that. Now, he's investigating another body--found buried in a location near where the boys died. Are the two cases related? Is there a murderer still out there?

    I still remember the moment I discovered

    , and

    . This one was no exception. This is a stand-alone novel, or at least not one of her Jim Clemo novels, and

    . When I first realized that part of the book was being told via the podcast format, I felt a bit of deja-vu, as I had just recently finished another book in that structure (

    ), but have no fear:

    .

    The book is told via the podcast; Jessica's point of view; and Fletcher's perspective--both now and back then, when he was a rookie cop, investigating the boys' death. You have to get used to the book swinging back and forth in time with Fletcher, but it doesn't take much, and it's worth it, because Macmillan parallels things so well in time.

    . Plus, we get to see the trajectory of Fletcher's life and the many decisions that have led him to where he his today.

    .

    . They are always so detailed and fully fleshed out. That is the case here: you will find yourself transported back to the estate twenty years ago, with Charlie, Scott, and Cody running around, and then to the present, with Cody and his podcast, Jessica struggling to keep her new life afloat, and Fletcher, unraveling the details on a new--potentially related--case.

    : what happened to Charlie and Scott all those years ago? Was it really Sidney Noyce? How about the body Fletcher just discovered nearby? Just a coincidence?

    . There are some wonderful and unexpected turns here. I adore a book that surprises me, and

    Overall, this is a

    . The characters are well-detailed and the book is beautifully plotted. It's

    . 4+ stars.

    I received a copy of this novel from the publisher and Edelweiss in return for an unbiased review (thank you!).

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  • Bkwmlee

    The summary for this book describes it as an “original, chilling, twisty mystery,” which I definitely feel is fitting, however I would also add one more word to that description: clever! This is one of those books where it’s best to go in knowing as little as possible and let the flow of the story take you on a ride that is at once thrilling and completely unpredictable!

    I’ve read my fair share of thrillers / psychological suspense novels the past few years, but none of them have been quite as u

    The summary for this book describes it as an “original, chilling, twisty mystery,” which I definitely feel is fitting, however I would also add one more word to that description: clever! This is one of those books where it’s best to go in knowing as little as possible and let the flow of the story take you on a ride that is at once thrilling and completely unpredictable!

    I’ve read my fair share of thrillers / psychological suspense novels the past few years, but none of them have been quite as unique as this one. At the heart of the story are two murder investigations that take place 20 years apart: human remains are found at a construction site where a new shopping center was to be installed and almost immediately, when it is discovered that the remains were excavated from the exact same spot where the bodies of Charlie Paige and Scott Ashby -- two 11-year-old boys from a nearby housing estate who had been brutally murdered -- were found 20 years ago, a long-closed murder investigation is brought back into the spotlight. At the same time, the boys’ childhood best friend Cody Swift, who narrowly escaped the same fate that Charlie and Scott endured, returns to Bristol – the town where he grew up and also where the murders took place – in a search for answers after being haunted by the deaths of his two friends for most of his life. He decides to use his experience as a filmmaker to produce a true crime podcast documenting his search in the hopes that people who might have been involved or knew anything about the case but were afraid to speak up previously would now come forth and set things straight. Presented as entire chapters interspersed throughout the story, each episode of the podcast was narrated by Cody and featured interviews with people who had been involved with the investigation several decades ago as well as residents of the housing estate that was forever changed after the murders. The rest of the chapters alternated between the perspectives of two other central characters in the story – Charlie’s mother Jessica Paige, who tries desperately to keep long-held secrets about the case buried, and also Detective John Fletcher, who had been the lead investigator on the original case and coincidentally was also the one who discovered the remains in the new case. In addition to these alternating perspectives, the narrative also features a dual timeline, with each chapter covering both the case in the present as well as the one that took place in the past.

    Despite the many threads to the story, the author Gilly Macmillan was able to tie everything together brilliantly, creating a tautly-written page-turner that I honestly found very hard to put down. As with most books from this genre, I picked up the clues throughout the story and thought I had everything all figured out, but then I got to the end and, well, all I am going to say is that I was completely wrong. I don’t want to say too much about the ending of course, but I was definitely floored by the “surprise twist” (though admittedly there was also some “follow up” to the ending that I was expecting but never got so in that sense, it was a little less satisfying). The other unique aspect with this story was the way the characters were written – I’m not going to go into much detail on this for fear of spoiling the story, but I will say that this was not the typical “protagonist vs antagonist” setup that we are used to seeing with these stories…with this one, the roles were far from clearly defined, which, for me, added another layer of complexity to the story. A word of caution – don’t be surprised if, by the time you get to the ending, you end up disliking every single character in this story….

    Overall, I definitely enjoyed this one, though I did have a slight problem with the way the transitions were done between the dual timelines, which confused me at first (and since I read an ARC version, it didn’t help that the formatting was already a bit off). I had to read the first two non-podcast chapters twice, but after I figured out the pattern, I was able to plow through the rest of the book without much issue. Needless to say, this one is highly recommended! I have not read Gilly Macmillan’s previous works but rest assured that I will be adding her other books to my TBR to read at a later date!

  • Shannon

    Podcast, multiple POVs, past & present! Yes pls! RTC

  • Theresa

    Okay, why. This book had a lot of potential. It was well written and the podcast transcripts were on point. I could really imagine them being voiced in the style of something like Serial. But again, I felt like the book was relying too heavily on the gimmick of being about a podcast instead of focusing on having an actually good story.

    This book's biggest problem is the all-over-the-place plot that leads nowhere, the ending that is super unsatisfying and the absolute lack of suspense throughout t

    Okay, why. This book had a lot of potential. It was well written and the podcast transcripts were on point. I could really imagine them being voiced in the style of something like Serial. But again, I felt like the book was relying too heavily on the gimmick of being about a podcast instead of focusing on having an actually good story.

    This book's biggest problem is the all-over-the-place plot that leads nowhere, the ending that is super unsatisfying and the absolute lack of suspense throughout the entire novel.

    In spoilery terms that means:

    This book did a terrible job of characterizing the main cast. The writing was good but the thriller part was done so clumsily, I really don't think you should waste your time on this. Skip it, find something better to read.

  • Brenda

    Is this book some kind of prank?

    Pranks cause humiliation, embarrassment, and anger. I feel I’ve been h

    Is this book some kind of prank?

    Pranks cause humiliation, embarrassment, and anger. I feel I’ve been had. Sorry I wasted my time with this. Don’t let the blurb suck you in. Skip this one. One star because the writing is good and I did finish reading the book.

    Addendum 1: Podcasts are an auditory experience. Reading them felt unnatural.

    Addendum 2: This was not a police procedural, or a mystery, or a thriller, or a suspense.

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