Matchmaking for Beginners

Matchmaking for Beginners

Marnie MacGraw wants an ordinary life—a husband, kids, and a minivan in the suburbs. Now that she’s marrying the man of her dreams, she’s sure this is the life she’ll get. Then Marnie meets Blix Holliday, her fiancé’s irascible matchmaking great-aunt who’s dying, and everything changes—just as Blix told her it would.When her marriage ends after two miserable weeks, Marnie...

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Title:Matchmaking for Beginners
Author:Maddie Dawson
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Matchmaking for Beginners Reviews

  • Kerry Anne King

    MATCHMAKING FOR BEGINNERS walked straight into my heart, trailing a shower of golden sparkles. Dawson has created a magical world inhabited by characters so engaging and real it seems plausible they might drop by for a cup of coffee. By turns funny, wise, and poignant, this is a story about falling in love—with the painful, messy, joyful business of living.

  • DJ Sakata

    Favorite Quotes:

    Pay no attention to Wendy… She missed the class on manners because she was attending two extra courses on personal intimidation.

    The life force is running out of this room! I’ve been at funerals that had better vibrations than this.

    We never got married because I’ve finally learned that if you have to bring the law into your personal relationships, then you’re doing it wrong.

    One time he said to me, “You know, I had a great six-pack when I was young,” and I said to him, “Bragging ab

    Favorite Quotes:

    Pay no attention to Wendy… She missed the class on manners because she was attending two extra courses on personal intimidation.

    The life force is running out of this room! I’ve been at funerals that had better vibrations than this.

    We never got married because I’ve finally learned that if you have to bring the law into your personal relationships, then you’re doing it wrong.

    One time he said to me, “You know, I had a great six-pack when I was young,” and I said to him, “Bragging about beer is so unbecoming for an old man.”

    It’s like he’s a person who has his emotions in a safety deposit box somewhere, and he forgot where he put it.

    My Review:

    Matchmaking for Beginners was the second superbly written book of Maddie Dawson’s that I have had the pleasure of reading. It produced a near-constant smirk and frequent subvocal chuckling. I have a strong compulsion to stop everything and simply indulge in all the various publications of this woman’s clever and creative work as I reveled in her word skills. I adored her highly amusing, clever, and keenly crafted storylines from start to finish. Her quirky characters were each uniquely, inexplicably, and magnetically intriguing, even the villains.

    The main character of Marnie was an oddly unobservant bubblehead who was all too easily tilted off the rails and careening towards ruin. While I may have wanted to give her a few smacks to the head with my Kindle, I also found her extraordinarily endearing and held my breath for her on numerous occasions. Ms. Dawson’s humor was well-honed, shiny, and crisp. I particularly enjoyed the witty exchanges between Marnie and Patrick, the “luminous” misanthropic hermit living in the dank basement. Sigh, more, please!

  • abby

    Marnie knows where her life is headed. She's engaged to the love of her life, Noah, and together they will create a stable, ordinary life. Yes, Marnie can see her future. The problem is that she's 100% wrong.

    Noah's great-aunt Blix only meets Marnie twice, but she instantly recognizes a fellow spirit, another matchmaker who can see the magic and love in the universe. She's also convinced Marnie has a big, big life in store. And it doesn't involve Noah. It turns out old Aunt Blix might have been o

    Marnie knows where her life is headed. She's engaged to the love of her life, Noah, and together they will create a stable, ordinary life. Yes, Marnie can see her future. The problem is that she's 100% wrong.

    Noah's great-aunt Blix only meets Marnie twice, but she instantly recognizes a fellow spirit, another matchmaker who can see the magic and love in the universe. She's also convinced Marnie has a big, big life in store. And it doesn't involve Noah. It turns out old Aunt Blix might have been onto something, because Noah and Marnie's marriage goes south before it even starts. Reeling from the break up, Marnie is shocked to learn that she's inherited Blix's house in Brooklyn. Just one problem: moving to Brooklyn doesn't fit into Marnie's plans. It also comes with an unexpected roommate-- Noah, of all people-- and several tenants who are struggling with their own relationships. Marnie is determined to sell the house and move back home, but, even from the grave, Blix has her way of making sure everyone discovers their destiny.

    This book was a bit of magic, a touch of humor, and a lot of romance. It reminded me of the chick-lit books that were popular 20 years ago but have become unfashionable, crowded out of the market by sullen women's fiction and creepy psychological thrillers. Let's just say I'm on board for the revival. I absolutely loved the author's sense of humor. And, yes, Marnie is a complete idiot most of the time, but you get used to it. This book wasn't profound literature, but it's a great summer read and a lot of fun.

  • Patricia Imperiale

    I liked this book. It was a cute, quick read. I liked Blix although I would have liked to hear more about her. Marnie got on my nerves at times, especially when Noah continually came into the house to take things. After the first time, what idiot doesn't change the locks? The man came in the house, uninvited, to take things, four times!

  • Larry H

    4.5 stars.

    What a terrific, sweet charmer of a book this was!!

    Every family has at least one oddball, one eccentric. Free-spirited Blix Holliday is her family's black sheep, and that doesn't bother her one bit, because she doesn't like them much anyway.

    She believes there's a perfect match for everyone, she believes in thought energy, watching people's auras, and her ability to wish things into existence—and she has a book of spells to prove it. Now in her 80s and terminally ill, she wants to live

    4.5 stars.

    What a terrific, sweet charmer of a book this was!!

    Every family has at least one oddball, one eccentric. Free-spirited Blix Holliday is her family's black sheep, and that doesn't bother her one bit, because she doesn't like them much anyway.

    She believes there's a perfect match for everyone, she believes in thought energy, watching people's auras, and her ability to wish things into existence—and she has a book of spells to prove it. Now in her 80s and terminally ill, she wants to live whatever time she has left on her own terms, surrounded by joy and those she loves.

    "This is a family that is rotten at its core, no matter what the decor tells you. I see things as they are, right through the fakery and pretense. I can still remember when this place really was authentically grand, before Wendy Spinnaker decided to throw thousands of dollars into some kind of fake restoration of its façade. But that sums up this family's philosophy of life perfectly: plaster over the real stuff, and slap a veneer on the top. Nobody will know. But I know."

    When she meets Marnie MacGraw, her great-nephew's fiancée, she immediately feels the two are kindred spirits. Both share some of the same abilities, like the ability to see when two people are destined for one another. But Marnie just wants a normal life—husband, kids, a house in the suburbs—so she doesn't believe Blix when she tells her that there's a great big life out there waiting for, an exciting one far beyond the comforts she craves.

    "The subversive truth about love is that it really

    the big deal everyone makes it out to be, and it's not some form of security or an insurance policy against loneliness. It's

    , love is. It runs the whole universe!"

    Marnie's marriage ends shortly after it began (and it never quite began), but she still can't believe that Blix was right, and that she's capable of exciting things. Little by little, she pulls her life back together and starts to trust her heart again, only to be thrown for another loop, when she learns that Blix has died and bequeathed her brownstone in Brooklyn. (Of course, the bequest isn't as straightforward as she expected.) But it's not just the house—Blix has "left" Marnie all of her pet projects; namely, her friends who are all desperate for love but they just don't see themselves as ready, or even worthy.

    So now Marnie finds herself in Brooklyn, uprooting her life and those closest to her once again. She's looking for a quick resolution to the whole brownstone issue, so she can get back to Florida and the plans she's made for her future. She doesn't understand how Blix thought her capable of greatness, because she just wants ordinary comforts. Yet as she settles into her life in Brooklyn and deals with some unexpected surprises and challenges, she starts to realize that perhaps Blix's work needs to be carried on—and maybe she's the one who needs to do it. The only challenge is, she needs a little of this work herself.

    "Everybody wants love, and the ones who appear to want it the least actually need it the most."

    This was one of those books that feels like a great big hug. It hooked me from the very first page and didn't let go, and I found myself utterly immersed in these characters. Is it predictable? Sure. Did it matter? Not in the slightest. This book was the perfect antidote to the heavy books I've read most recently, and it not only made me smile, but it made me tear up through the smiles, too.

    I thought Maddie Dawson did such a terrific job creating quirky and complex characters. Not everyone is likable (just like real life), and not everyone is 100 percent good or selfless (again, just like real life), but even though the book made me believe that just a little touch of magic and mysticism can exist in our world, it also was tremendously believable, because quite often the people who can be difficult to love are the ones who need that love most.

    Three cheers for

    . When you need something to charm you, pick this one up.

    See all of my reviews at

    .

  • Rose (Traveling Sister)

    This is the kind of book that will likely get made into a holiday rom-com starring an awkward mishmash of celebrities in a couple years, but it made me laugh quite a bit, so it gets 3.5 stars.

    The concept is...funky: a dying great-aunt (Blix) conjures romantic magic all around her, and she wants to leave behind her legacy for a young woman she hardly knows (Marnie) because there's some sort of kismet between them. The characters seem to be compelling and quirky enough to carry this thing. Okay,

    This is the kind of book that will likely get made into a holiday rom-com starring an awkward mishmash of celebrities in a couple years, but it made me laugh quite a bit, so it gets 3.5 stars.

    The concept is...funky: a dying great-aunt (Blix) conjures romantic magic all around her, and she wants to leave behind her legacy for a young woman she hardly knows (Marnie) because there's some sort of kismet between them. The characters seem to be compelling and quirky enough to carry this thing. Okay, I'll bite.

    And so it begins. Marnie doesn't know what to do after a Kardashian-quick marriage, but her family does! Move home to Florida! Find a job you hate! Make lots of rash decisions that you're in no mental state to make! They urged her to do the absolute worst things for her emotional health, then acted surprised when she repeated the cycle. They were insufferable.

    So, naturally, we fall into the exact same trap one more time. This is where I think Dawson was trying to throw things in to make the book longer. Yes, Marnie is experiencing a major life change, but that doesn't mean we need to drag hapless random characters through the mud who won't end up meaning anything. There were unnecessary plot lines that weren't integral at all to Marnie finding her way, but we're supposed to buy them as whimsical speed bumps. #JUSTICE4JEREMY.

    This was one of those laugh-out-loud moments for me that made it a worthwhile read. I really enjoyed the themes of embracing one's vices and letting go because the world will find a balance for you. It almost made up for the atrocious mental health crimes in the first half of the book. And the charm factor was pretty high, which kept me reading despite the confusing plot points. While Marnie herself did unforgivable things, she also had unforgivable things done to her. By the end, once she's figured out how to help herself, she also helps everyone else, who are mostly good people.

    Blix, Patrick, Sammy, and a great dog and cat were just a few examples of characters that kept this thing afloat. I'm probably not perfectly suited to review romance novels because I'm normally either reading something suspenseful or nonfiction about, like, political injustice. But this was a cute read perfect for a summer self-care weekend.

  • Xavier (CharlesXplosion)

    Matchmaking for Beginners is a nonsensical, overly sappy romance novel that features a incoherent story coupled with insufferable characters.

  • Jessa

    I really wanted to love this book, and there were aspects that were good, but there was too much happening in what could have been a much more streamlined/focused story. And Marnie was SO very unlikable to me?? I didn’t feel any sympathy for her, and honestly, I think she and Noah deserved each other. She def didn’t deserve Patrick. And wow, I hate how shabbily she treated poor Jeremy, the real underdog of the story.

  • Bibi

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