Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach

Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach

Discover a shifting history of adventure as humanity clashes over whether to repair their ruined planet or luxuriate in a less tainted past.In 2267, Earth has just begun to recover from worldwide ecological disasters. Minh is part of the generation that first moved back up to the surface of the Earth from the underground hells, to reclaim humanity's ancestral habitat. She'...

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Title:Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach
Author:Kelly Robson
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach Reviews

  • Rachel (Kalanadi)

    I loved this! Video review:

    (Thank you to the publisher for providing me with a digital ARC.)

  • Lindsay

    A novella that starts in the future with a small cast of environmental remediation specialists working in Calgary, Canada after a global ecological apocalypse, and then heads into the distant past for a time travel mission to ancient Mesopotamia.

    Our main character is Minh, pictured in the amazing cover art, is a "plague baby", one of a generation of humans born into incredible hardship. In Minh's case she has no lower limbs and uses an octopus-like prosthesis. Her partner is another plague baby

    A novella that starts in the future with a small cast of environmental remediation specialists working in Calgary, Canada after a global ecological apocalypse, and then heads into the distant past for a time travel mission to ancient Mesopotamia.

    Our main character is Minh, pictured in the amazing cover art, is a "plague baby", one of a generation of humans born into incredible hardship. In Minh's case she has no lower limbs and uses an octopus-like prosthesis. Her partner is another plague baby and a "fat baby" (a healthy human). When Minh's team is approached to bid for a research trip to the cradle of human civilization she can't resist.

    Wonderful characters and a brilliantly realized world make this novella move along well at an endlessly inventive pace. Fair warning though, if there's no book two then that's an incredibly unsatisfying ending. It's not quite a cliff-hanger, but it's a hell of a tease as to what's next.

  • Justine

    3.5 stars rounded up

    A very interesting novella. At the outset I felt like the worldbuilding was a bit of a combination of too much detail about some things and not enough about others. The characters, however, were quite wonderful right from the start.

    About the halfway point things smoothed out for me, and once the time travel happened I loved the entire portion spent in the past. That ending though, what? I want some more please :)

  • Veronique

    3.5*

    Another rather good novella, this time featuring a future where Earth has suffered a devastating ecological disaster and humans are trying to re-built/re-generate the planet. The vision Robson gives us is intriguing, from the technology used to the different ‘classes’ of people.

    The two narratives, juxtaposing the far past with the far future into recognisable worlds, work very well together, presenting such different societies, and yet when you come down to it, not that much. That was fasci

    3.5*

    Another rather good novella, this time featuring a future where Earth has suffered a devastating ecological disaster and humans are trying to re-built/re-generate the planet. The vision Robson gives us is intriguing, from the technology used to the different ‘classes’ of people.

    The two narratives, juxtaposing the far past with the far future into recognisable worlds, work very well together, presenting such different societies, and yet when you come down to it, not that much. That was fascinating, that and having an older woman as the main narrator.

    All well and good but we’re just given tantalising morsels when the plate promises so much more! I wonder if this would have worked better as a full novel, especially in light of that ‘end’.

  • Leo Robertson

    Fascinating, imaginatively dense and highly compelling sci-fi novella about time-travelling ecological preservation projects? For sure!

    Since Robson is evidently a devourer of sci-fi, this reads like a story for sci-fi devourers. The details come thick and fast at the beginning in simple enough language--habitats are "habs", "bioms" monitor health, "whispering" is like telepathy (right?), there are "bots" helping out around the peach orchard, the protagonist has six legs--to name a few! Yet the w

    Fascinating, imaginatively dense and highly compelling sci-fi novella about time-travelling ecological preservation projects? For sure!

    Since Robson is evidently a devourer of sci-fi, this reads like a story for sci-fi devourers. The details come thick and fast at the beginning in simple enough language--habitats are "habs", "bioms" monitor health, "whispering" is like telepathy (right?), there are "bots" helping out around the peach orchard, the protagonist has six legs--to name a few! Yet the writing style is such that it presents these ideas to readers who are already very familiar with sci-fi concepts. If a detail of the world or its history doesn't explicitly relate to the story being told, it's still left in but not explained as in-depth--risking confusion for the sake of denser worldbuilding without sacrificing pace. A daring strategy--worked for me. I guess that's why they say sci-fi is the literature of ideas, and there are a multitude within.

    Also, the story naturally leaves scope in and around its timeline for future works, which I've gleaned is the author's plan. Like other readers, I'm holding off speaking more about the plot because I'm not sure I understood it completely (though I re-read the opening chapter again and understood it much better.) Anyway, that's fine: the best books are worth re-reading. And the best authors pursue their concepts with such strong authorial voices that it's like, "Okay, you're gonna have to slow down and learn how to read me, because this hasn't been done before." And Robson is an original to look out for!

  • Lata

    3.5 stars. Great mix of elements in a future post-environmental destruction, with habitats, different generations of humans (that’s not a good description of the differences based on those born during plague years and those born much more healthy afterwards), projects to rebuild portions of the environment, and time travel. And a fabulous book cover. And an older female protagonist. And, a story that begins in a future Canada!

    This is a story with a lot of interesting elements though I wouldn’t

    3.5 stars. Great mix of elements in a future post-environmental destruction, with habitats, different generations of humans (that’s not a good description of the differences based on those born during plague years and those born much more healthy afterwards), projects to rebuild portions of the environment, and time travel. And a fabulous book cover. And an older female protagonist. And, a story that begins in a future Canada!

    This is a story with a lot of interesting elements though I wouldn’t have minded a longer length so I could better understand main protagonist Minh. I liked the idea of environmental remediation projects and the expertise required for these endeavours, and the dance between the demands of these projects and corporate short-term thinking.

    There’s enough in this novella that I found myself wishing that the story elements could have been explored in a longer format, and whoa! That ending! There better be more tales in this universe.

  • Gabrielle

    A very interesting novella about time-travel and ecology! I got this one on sale for Kindle as a vacation read, and I had no idea what I was getting into.

    Earth has suffered massive ecological disasters and humans are slowly re-building the ecosystems necessary for the planet’s survival. An older generation of humans, the “plague babies” grew up during the worse of the cataclysms, and some, like our protagonist, Minh, chose to get artificial limbs installed in order to navigate their complicated

    A very interesting novella about time-travel and ecology! I got this one on sale for Kindle as a vacation read, and I had no idea what I was getting into.

    Earth has suffered massive ecological disasters and humans are slowly re-building the ecosystems necessary for the planet’s survival. An older generation of humans, the “plague babies” grew up during the worse of the cataclysms, and some, like our protagonist, Minh, chose to get artificial limbs installed in order to navigate their complicated environment more effectively. The younger generation, known as “fat babies” because they are healthy, have always known the world as it is, and while they try to help, their perspective is completely different. Minh is given a contract to use time-travelling technology to go observe the Tiger and Euphrates rivers in ancient Mesopotamia, and to use what can be learned from that virtually untouched environment to fix the river systems in her time period’s North America. Now who could resist an offer like that? But as it must, things don’t go quite as planned…

    The pacing is good, with an interweaving of Minh’s timeline narration and quick glimpses of the ancient world she is about to visit, and the world-building quite clever, revealing just enough to keep the reader engaged without drowning the pace with info-dumping. This is far from my first post-apocalyptic sci-fi story and yet I have never encountered a world quite like this one, and I wanted more! The open ending, however, is both interesting (because it opens so many possibilities) and frustrating because no sequel is planned! Bummer…

    3 and a half stars, rounded up because Canada!!

  • Rina

    3 stars- I liked it.

    Kelly Robson has created a unique world in Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach. The concept, prosthetic limbs help create mutants who travel back in time to an early river civilization, kept my interest throughout this novella. Even though I thoroughly enjoyed the world building in this story, I did not find myself too emotionally involved with the characters. With that being said, I think I will read future works by this author.

    Recommended for fans of The Chronicles of St M

    3 stars- I liked it.

    Kelly Robson has created a unique world in Gods, Monsters, and the Lucky Peach. The concept, prosthetic limbs help create mutants who travel back in time to an early river civilization, kept my interest throughout this novella. Even though I thoroughly enjoyed the world building in this story, I did not find myself too emotionally involved with the characters. With that being said, I think I will read future works by this author.

    Recommended for fans of The Chronicles of St Mary's Series by Jodi Taylor

  • Gary

    RTC

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