Rebound

Rebound

Before Josh and Jordan Bell were streaking up and down the court, their father was learning his own moves. In this prequel to Newbery Medal winner The Crossover, Chuck Bell takes center stage, as readers get a glimpse of his childhood and how he became the jazz music worshipping, basketball star his sons look up to.   ...

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Title:Rebound
Author:Kwame Alexander
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Rebound Reviews

  • Shauna Yusko

    OMG. I'm in love with this.

  • Beth Parmer

    The way this story stands on its own while beautifully weaving into The Crossover is genius.

  • Kate Olson

    Thanks to HMH Kids for the advance copy of this book for review - all opinions are my own.

    I adore THE CROSSOVER, as do my students, and this prequel is just as wonderful. While it technically could be read as a stand alone, this story is so much more meaningful when read with the context of Chuck Bell as the basketball star father from THE CROSSOVER. I highly recommend this stellar novel in verse for purchase in all middle grade libraries - I will be purchasing for both my elementary and middle

    Thanks to HMH Kids for the advance copy of this book for review - all opinions are my own.

    I adore THE CROSSOVER, as do my students, and this prequel is just as wonderful. While it technically could be read as a stand alone, this story is so much more meaningful when read with the context of Chuck Bell as the basketball star father from THE CROSSOVER. I highly recommend this stellar novel in verse for purchase in all middle grade libraries - I will be purchasing for both my elementary and middle/high collections.

  • Mary Ann

    I loved reading Rebound. Especially the ending.

    And his grandpa. Love him fiercely.

    And the comics (poetry slam in comics!!!!!)

    And the corny jokes -- burst out laughing in several places (too much sax & violins!)

    But really, the power of metaphor to open your heart.

    For all of us when we feel storm-beaten and shattered, how we can hold onto hope. Thank you.

  • Christina Hanson

    You know, Chuck,

    he says.

    You’re not always gonna swish.

    ...

    You gonna miss some.

    Heck, you gonna miss a lot.

    That’s the way the real world works.

    But you gotta grab the ball and

    keep shooting. You understand?

    Yessir.

    I tell you what, though,

    you’ll make a lot more

    than you miss if

    you’re not always going for

    the flash

    and flair.

    Try using

    the backboard, son.

    You got me.

    You got your grandmother.

    You got Roxie.

    You got your mother.

    You got all of us,

    remember that!

    Kwame “Da Man” Alexander has done it again with his

    You know, Chuck,

    he says.

    You’re not always gonna swish.

    ...

    You gonna miss some.

    Heck, you gonna miss a lot.

    That’s the way the real world works.

    But you gotta grab the ball and

    keep shooting. You understand?

    Yessir.

    I tell you what, though,

    you’ll make a lot more

    than you miss if

    you’re not always going for

    the flash

    and flair.

    Try using

    the backboard, son.

    You got me.

    You got your grandmother.

    You got Roxie.

    You got your mother.

    You got all of us,

    remember that!

    Kwame “Da Man” Alexander has done it again with his new book, Rebound! In this prequel to his award-winning book, The Crossover, we learn a lot more about young Charlie (AKA Chuck) before he became Josh and JB’s dad. I have a feeling this one won’t see the bookshelf once students get their hands on this after spring break!

  • Paul  Hankins

    I'm not going to say anything about this book until you've had a chance to read it.

    But, I can tell you this. . .I am so happy. . .like so many of you. . .to get in on the "ground floor" with Kwame Alexander. Reading those first books of a shining star of literature for young people.

    REBOUND is special. And it hits every post a prequel should hit.

    Oh. I've said too much.

  • Brittany

    I didn’t think this was possible, but I love this even more than The Crossover. This prequel is expertly written as it makes you forget what you know is coming, but is also so very satisfying as it puts some bows on some answers.

    The writing is phenomenal, but the characters are even better. I love every, single one..yes, Charlie/Chuck, mom, CJ are all amazing, but the grandparents stole the show for me. Granddad is sassy and sweet and tender and tough.

    You’ll love it.

  • Abby Johnson

    My heeeeaaaarrrtttt.

    Y'all know I love The Crossover (for obvious reasons!). This companion book takes a step into the past, telling the story of Josh and JB's dad when he was a middle-schooler. Reeling from the sudden loss of his father, Charlie Bell is struggling. His mom's unable to reach him and afraid that he's going to end up in trouble, so she sends him to spend the summer with his grandparents in Washington DC. There, Charlie gets to know his family and, against his better judgment, star

    My heeeeaaaarrrtttt.

    Y'all know I love The Crossover (for obvious reasons!). This companion book takes a step into the past, telling the story of Josh and JB's dad when he was a middle-schooler. Reeling from the sudden loss of his father, Charlie Bell is struggling. His mom's unable to reach him and afraid that he's going to end up in trouble, so she sends him to spend the summer with his grandparents in Washington DC. There, Charlie gets to know his family and, against his better judgment, starts playing basketball.

    If you read and loved The Crossover, you NEED to read this book. If you haven't read The Crossover, this book will still resonate with you. You'll find strong characters and emotions deftly crafted into prose poems and even comic sections (young Charlie Bell would much rather read comics than pick up a ball).

  • Joe

    The first poem in

    is a lovely series off fleeting, non-rhyming couplets that capture a time, a place, a memory. I pulled the book to my chest. "This is it," I thought.

    The second poem in

    captured the manic, frenetic energy of Alexander's masterful

    : it was all sound and feeling, energy and zip, breathlessly exciting poetry. I pulled the book to my chest. "I want to savor this," I thought.

    Then I got to the first comic, which, in the ARC, is

    The first poem in

    is a lovely series off fleeting, non-rhyming couplets that capture a time, a place, a memory. I pulled the book to my chest. "This is it," I thought.

    The second poem in

    captured the manic, frenetic energy of Alexander's masterful

    : it was all sound and feeling, energy and zip, breathlessly exciting poetry. I pulled the book to my chest. "I want to savor this," I thought.

    Then I got to the first comic, which, in the ARC, is still in sketch mode. Even in its zygote stage, I thought, "How fresh is this!" I pulled the book to my chest. "All the feels," I thought.

    Alexander's poetry has always struck me as new and innovative, something to marvel at and pore over. Unfortunately, that kinetic power starts to feel really forced about fifty pages into

    . It starts to feel less like poetry and more like a gimmick, where dialog is stacked in italicized couplets, stanzas just become paragraphs, and toying with space and font size just feels like... toying with space and font size.

    I still had hope, though.

    Until page 74.

    , Skinny whispers.

    I put the book down. "Did I miss something?" I thought.

    I flipped back to the book's beginning. Nope. There it was.

    . Summer of 1988, to be more precise. I was 11 years old in the summer of '88. There was no Tupac in 1988. I distinctly remembered being a freshman in high school when Tupac made a name for himself. Even if you didn't like hip-hop, you knew who Tupac was in 1991.

    Just in case my own memory was faulty, I consulted Our Friend the Interwebz. Memory had not failed me. In fact, "Keep Ya Head Up" came out in 1993. Five years after the events of the book.

    Now this isn't a terrible thing - it's a mistake in an ARC, so it should be corrected by publishing time. But this little slip up forced me to put up my radar, and soon, every time Alexander mentioned a pop culture staple of the late 1980s, I became suspicious - either because it butted against my own memory or I just stopped trusting Alexander.

    I started fact checking. And things did not shake out in Alexander's favor.

    1. Slick Rick, whose new single and video protagonist Chuck and his friend Skinny can't wait to see, didn't release his first single until November of 1988. Arguably, Rick's first massive hit wasn't even released until April of 1989.

    2. Allen Iverson, who Chuck is told has already won a couple of high school championships, had just turned 13 in June of 1988. Probably not winning any high school championships when he's still in junior high.

    3. When Chuck and his cousin Roxie go to the Harlem Globetrotters game, Chuck is picked to play C.U.R.L.Y. with Globetrotter extraordinaire Curly Neal. Neal retired from the Globetrotters in 1985.

    This is just lazy research. Or relying on a faulty memory.

    "You're being nit-picky, Joe," you might say. And yes, I am. But I want Alexander to win another four million awards for his amazing poetry. Factual inaccuracies can keep that from happening!

    But so, too, can lousy poetry. True: Alexander's poetry in

    is never particularly lousy. But it

    feel done before. It rarely feels fresh or energizing or even inviting. It feels shopworn and, at times, a little lazy. And after 250 pages, it's exhausting. It's even more exhausting when you realize, at the 250 mark, that you still have about 175 pages to go. Truly: the events of this book could have been edited down to fewer than 300 pages. The emotional payoff in the final poem is more like receiving a half-hearted high five than a trophy for the tribulations that came before.

    What works here is - what is fresh and groundbreaking - is the graphic novel components. I really enjoyed the comics sprinkled throughout. Because Chuck is so obsessed with comics, these graphic poems operate on multiple levels: they illustrate how Chuck sees himself, they showcase Alexander's innate ability to play with language, and they provide a visual trajectory for the words as well. I'd never seen anything like it before. It's inspiring stuff. I wish the whole book had been rendered in this style.

    I will revisit this title once it's published in its definitive state. I hope the storytelling will be tightened by a lot, and I hope those errors are corrected. And I hope the graphic components are even more dynamite in the finished product. And maybe there will be more of them.

    For now, though, 2 stars.

    God, I hate that I just gave Kwame Alexander two stars.

    It hurts my heart.

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