You Think It, I'll Say It

You Think It, I'll Say It

A suburban mother of two fantasizes about the downfall of an old friend whose wholesome lifestyle empire may or may not be built on a lie. A high-powered lawyer honeymooning with her husband is caught off guard by the appearance of the girl who tormented her in high school. A shy Ivy League student learns the truth about a classmate’s seemingly enviable life.Curtis Sittenf...

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Title:You Think It, I'll Say It
Author:Curtis Sittenfeld
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Edition Language:English

You Think It, I'll Say It Reviews

  • Elyse Walters

    Curtis Sittenfeld is TERRIFIC!!! I LOVE THIS WOMAN...this author....her work! Oh....I’m not the only person nutty over this great woman/author.... ‘many’ of you feel the same.

    I fell in love with Curtis years ago - 2005 - with her first novel “PREP”. Three years later, Sittenfeld wrote “American Wife”... and she blew me away. It was also fantastic... with a new level of maturity to boot.

    I, personally, had a blast of fun reading “Eligible”: A modern retelling of Pride and Prejudice. I read a few

    Curtis Sittenfeld is TERRIFIC!!! I LOVE THIS WOMAN...this author....her work! Oh....I’m not the only person nutty over this great woman/author.... ‘many’ of you feel the same.

    I fell in love with Curtis years ago - 2005 - with her first novel “PREP”. Three years later, Sittenfeld wrote “American Wife”... and she blew me away. It was also fantastic... with a new level of maturity to boot.

    I, personally, had a blast of fun reading “Eligible”: A modern retelling of Pride and Prejudice. I read a few low reviews from readers missing their beloved characters ....but I loved the modernization updated story that took place in Cincinnati. I’ve had a new ‘thing’ for Cincinnati every since reading “Eligible”...

    I wish I could be part of a seminar/group where we discussed ALL BOOKS by Curtis Sittenfeld. The icing on the cake would be if Curtis lead it.

    When it comes to contemporary fiction - great laughs - insights - punch’s of truth in my gut - I don’t have to look much further than a Curtis Sittenfeld book.

    “You Think It, I’ll Say It”, .....is A FABULOUS COLLECTION of short stories. The title of the book is actually ‘not’ the title of one of the short stories .... rather it is a GAME played between two people - Julie and Graham - in the short story called “The World Has Many Butterflies”. It’s a game I thought about ... as “DON’T TRY THIS AT HOME”.... why? (I’ll let you figure that out)....BUT THIS IS ONE FRICKIN GREAT STORY....with an edge of caution.

    “A Regular Couple” is another AWESOME STORY!!! Actually my favorite of the bunch.....so much so - I read it to Paul. He laughed - and enjoyed it as much as me! Then when we went hiking this morning- and I was tying my shoes....I had a private laugh to myself...( you’ll have to read the story to enjoy the inside joke).....

    There’s a lot going on in the story - including - complete strangers were saying Maggie had betrayed feminism. She had been a prosecutor on a televised case where a man is accused of raping a cocktail waitress there was not sufficient evidence against him, but many people in the public felt he was guilty. Sound familiar? :). There is much more to ‘this’ story.

    Jason and Maggie are on their honeymoon. The year is 2008. Maggie sees an old nightmarish blonde woman, Ashley Frye, who attended her high school in Cleveland 1992....who happens to be on her honeymoon, too. She is married to a guy named Ed.

    *Yippy-do-da*......Jason, Maggie, Ashley, and Ed are going to enjoy some couple-bonding! Oh, boy... things just start to get fun.

    Maggie’s thoughts on the morning hike are:

    “Below her daypack, I could see her little butt, encased in jogging shorts, and her tan, shapely legs, which ended in gray wool socks and hiking boots. Even though we were surrounded by birch trees and wildflowers and distance snow-peaked mountains, my attention was on Ashley— I detested myself for this, and I also couldn’t help it”.

    And if you like that.....wait until they meet for dinner.

    ALL THE STORIES ARE GREAT! I loved everything about it and I highly recommend it.... everyone needs a few short stories and a little Curtis Sittenfeld now and then!

    Thank You Netgalley, Random House, and Curtis Sittenfeld!

  • Jessica

    I received this book for free through LibraryThing’s Early Reviewers.

    This collection of short stories was so amazing!

    I’ve only ever read Curtis Sittenfeld’s novel,

    . I read that a long time ago (like around 10 years ago) but I do remember that I enjoyed it. I’ve never read any of her short stories so I did not know what to expect.

    I was blown away by how good ALL the stories were. Usually with short story collections, there will be some stories I liked and some that I didn’t. But with this

    I received this book for free through LibraryThing’s Early Reviewers.

    This collection of short stories was so amazing!

    I’ve only ever read Curtis Sittenfeld’s novel,

    . I read that a long time ago (like around 10 years ago) but I do remember that I enjoyed it. I’ve never read any of her short stories so I did not know what to expect.

    I was blown away by how good ALL the stories were. Usually with short story collections, there will be some stories I liked and some that I didn’t. But with this collection I can honestly say that I liked them all. I was trying to decide which one was my favorite, but after much debating, I just couldn’t pick one!

    Subject-wise, all the stories were very current. A lot of them dealt with motherhood and marriage.

    I really liked how the book came full circle. The very first story mentioned the presidential candidacy of Donald Trump and the last story mentioned the election of Donald Trump. That connection gave the book a sense of closure, which you don’t really see in short story collections.

    Curtis Sittenfeld’s writing style is phenomenal. She writes with such an ease that makes it all seem so effortless. She is truly a talented writer.

    Overall, if you are looking for a quality short story collection, then definitely pick this book up!

  • Larry H

    4.5 stars.

    Many of us, whether we'll admit it or not, have made snap judgments about people. Sometimes we judge people we might have met once, or known a long time ago, and are coming into contact with them again after a while. Sometimes we believe something about a person we know well, while other times, it's people we don't know, but we formulate an opinion based on something we hear them say or do.

    The characters in Curtis Sittenfeld's first story collection,

    , are a

    4.5 stars.

    Many of us, whether we'll admit it or not, have made snap judgments about people. Sometimes we judge people we might have met once, or known a long time ago, and are coming into contact with them again after a while. Sometimes we believe something about a person we know well, while other times, it's people we don't know, but we formulate an opinion based on something we hear them say or do.

    The characters in Curtis Sittenfeld's first story collection,

    , are all guilty of judging others, but the tension in the 10 stories occurs when those judgments are revealed to be incorrect, either gradually or all at once. The end result are thought-provoking stories which leave their mark in your head, and at times, in your heart.

    I enjoyed all of the stories in the collection, although I felt eight of them were the strongest. My favorites included: "The Prairie Wife," in which an unappreciated housewife realizes a popular celebrity was a girl she was romantically involved with briefly during summer camp, although the celebrity is now a married darling of conservatives; "Gender Studies," which follows a college professor's fling with her airport shuttle driver—for the wrong reason; "Off the Record," about a freelance writer lined up to interview an actress on the cusp of major fame, someone she had connected with when interviewing them a few years earlier; "The World Has Many Butterflies," in which a man and a woman engage in a gossipy game every time they see each other, but only one interprets that as the sign of something deeper; and "Do-Over," about a reunion between two boarding school classmates who each have different interpretations of past events.

    I've been a fan of Sittenfeld's since I read her debut novel,

    , back in 2005. I found it so engaging and surprising, and I've followed her work ever since. That same talent is more than evident in

    —these stories aren't outlandish or unrealistic, and you could imagine the situations the characters face happening to you, or hearing about them from people you know. Her writing style is so breezy and approachable, and there were times I didn't realize how dazzling her words were until after they passed me by, kind of like a person wearing a cologne or perfume you suddenly catch the scent of.

    I know short stories aren't for everyone, but this is one of those collections I think even non-story lovers might enjoy. Most of the stories feel like mini-novels, and there were at least a few I'd love to see developed into something more expansive.

    is a prime example of why I love stories, and the incredible talent it takes to make a collection work. Come on, give it a shot!

    NetGalley and Random House provided me an advance copy of the book in exchange for an unbiased review. Thanks for making this available!

    See all of my reviews at

    , or check out my list of the best books I read in 2017 at

    .

  • Liz

    3.5 stars rounded up

    Short stories are the tapas of the book menu. Small plates, when I like big portions. So, I was really conflicted about reading this. I like Curtis Sittenfeld, but I hate the fact that a short story typically ends just as I’m getting invested in a character.

    There does seem to be a theme here, involving communication, appearances and first impressions. What do we say? What do we stay silent about? Or what do we think we know about someone vs. what is real. In each of these st

    3.5 stars rounded up

    Short stories are the tapas of the book menu. Small plates, when I like big portions. So, I was really conflicted about reading this. I like Curtis Sittenfeld, but I hate the fact that a short story typically ends just as I’m getting invested in a character.

    There does seem to be a theme here, involving communication, appearances and first impressions. What do we say? What do we stay silent about? Or what do we think we know about someone vs. what is real. In each of these stories, the narrator misjudges someone.

    Sittenfeld tackles some interesting subjects. Adult crushes, texting affairs, belatedly realized sexism. Almost all the stories involve the interaction between men and women.

    All the stories are interesting, some really grabbed me (like The World Has Many Butterflies and Plausible Deniability) . They’re all really well written. She does a great job building up the tension between characters. And there’s always a point to be made.

    But damn it, in the end it comes down to I want more. A five minute YouTube clip isn’t enough, I want a full length movie. Nothing against you, Curtis, this is just not my style. Please, please, please write a full length novel next time.

    My thanks to netgalley and Random House for an advance copy of this book.

  • Navidad Thelamour

    Curtis Sittenfeld’s

    , is a collection for the grown woman, for the woman who still thinks back on her “youth” and college y

    Curtis Sittenfeld’s

    , is a collection for the grown woman, for the woman who still thinks back on her “youth” and college years with fondness but also with a sense of wonder –

    This is a smart collection—one that explores the natural irony in our everyday lives. There’s a lot of wistful nostalgia and contemplation in this collection on the feat—the very fact and act—of being pretty: what it means to be “pretty” and how that affects us as adult women.

    Here would be a great place to say that “Plausible Deniability,” “Off the Record” and “A Regular Couple” were my other favorites. I wasn’t particularly fond of “Gender Studies,” in which a woman misplaces her license and ends up having a sexual encounter with the taxi driver she believes has found the license. I first read this one in

    in the fall of 2016. There were speculations and allusions from other bloggers that maybe Sittenfeld was offering political commentary on a nation’s identity lost! (I say in my dramatic voice) due to the (imminent) election of Trump, but I didn’t see it. I just took that story at face value and it wasn’t bad but it wasn’t a favorite either.

    These are just a few of the narratives you’ll find here in this 10-story collection. There were

    that a story would start and I’d fear it was going down the route of “Everyday Yuppie,” and I cringed. BUT, EVERY time, Sittenfeld pulled the story back from the brink with a twist of irony and humor. After the third or fourth story, I just relaxed into the read and went with it, knowing that the place I’d end up in the end wasn’t where I thought I was going in the beginning. I know I’m not alone when I say that I

    being able to trust an author, to trust a narrator, like that. It allows for a phenomenally smooth read and for the reader to have time to become one with the characters, no matter how short the stories are.

    This collection ran a gamut of stories that wasn’t necessarily wide but did manage to convey a delightful spectrum of sentiments, emotions and lessons. “Bad Latch” was by far one of my favorite stories, hilariously Yuppie and otherworldly—these sheltered, middle-class moms who spend their days at infant swimming lessons and pregnancy yoga—then the story morphed into something so much more special and resonating:

    In

    , Curtis Sittenfeld’s distinctive writing style is in full form. It’s casual and conversational, witty and makes for an easy, entertaining read. I also gave her a strong 4 stars for her novel

    for this same reason. I blew through about 60% of this collection in one sitting, so well did it flow and move me along with the characters and their ironic contemplative situations. Not only that, but I was pleasantly surprised to find that Sittenfeld is a true master of showing her reader rather than telling her reader. I got to know so much about her characters simply by watching them in their everyday lives, and she, as the writer, trusted her reader enough to let us figure out what she was trying to say. Each story is set in a different city (all either during or referencing the 1990s) which I thought was a FANTASTIC device, creating a kind of survey of American—well, upperish middle class white American—life. That survey aspect was a real gem, because each story in this collection set up a different dilemma rooted in the same basic question—the question of

    None of these stories takes an overly grandiose view of life. No one is living in a sci fi fantasy world of improbable circumstances and star ships. These stories all happen right here on Earth, literally, of course, but more importantly, figuratively. And for me, that’s always a breath of fresh air. A strong 4 stars ****

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  • Skyler Autumn

    You Think It, I'll Say it is a collection of short stories that tackles the complexities and diversity of judgment. Whether it's based on personal biases, misgivings, or hilariously misconstrued situations the character's in Curtis Sittenfeld's stories are all victims of their own preconceived notions. We as readers get to see how damaging and self-sabotaging it is to let judgement fester within. Whether it's through a naive university student falsely idolizing her less then perfect fri

    You Think It, I'll Say it is a collection of short stories that tackles the complexities and diversity of judgment. Whether it's based on personal biases, misgivings, or hilariously misconstrued situations the character's in Curtis Sittenfeld's stories are all victims of their own preconceived notions. We as readers get to see how damaging and self-sabotaging it is to let judgement fester within. Whether it's through a naive university student falsely idolizing her less then perfect friend, or a shelter volunteer feeling antagonistic towards the perky new girl, or a woman internet stalking her ex-lover turned famous lifestyle guru. You Think it, I'll say it is not a chastising towards judgement it's just a reflection and examination on a very common thing human's do towards each other. It's the old adage

    we all know it, try to abide by it, but at the end of the day we all go into new situations and meet new people placing our own hidden meanings on different circumstance based purely on personal bias that we have accumulated through life. Judgment is human nature and it was fun to read a collection of short stories circling around that theme.

    I love Curtis Sittenfeld's writing! Her short stories are complex and unique and always leave you satisfied by the conclusion. I highly recommend this read, and judging (see what I did there) by my own love of this book and her last one Eligible, I am now certain I must devour everything this woman has written!

  • Roxane

    Solid collection. Sittenfeld is an excellent writer. These stories are all beautifully composed and they draw you in. I am impressed by how engaged I felt with each set of characters in each stories.

    There is a mean undercurrent in many of the stories. Some might call it honesty. The way her characters see others, themselves... is rarely charitable. Nor does it need to be. At a few points though, I found myself thinking, “is everyone in the world really so terrible?” So much here made me cringe

    Solid collection. Sittenfeld is an excellent writer. These stories are all beautifully composed and they draw you in. I am impressed by how engaged I felt with each set of characters in each stories.

    There is a mean undercurrent in many of the stories. Some might call it honesty. The way her characters see others, themselves... is rarely charitable. Nor does it need to be. At a few points though, I found myself thinking, “is everyone in the world really so terrible?” So much here made me cringe in the best possible way. People, man.

    Also these are white middle class people stories. That’s not a bad thing. These stories are really good! But there is one story where people of color kind of serve as a backdrop against with the protagonist acts and it’s a bit awkward in that it reveals the whiteness of the collection in very distinct ways. This is an observation more than a judgment.

    Prairie Wife is as amazing as ever. I’ve read that story several times and it never gets old. Look for it in BASS 2018. Which I am editing. Shameless, I am.

    Anyway this is well worth reading

  • Thomas

    Loved this short story collection, grateful for my Goodreads' friends for pointing me to it. Curtis Sittenfeld gives us several perceptive stories about adults with messy pasts, nuanced relationships, and very real emotions. A few of the stories feature: a woman who sees her old queer fling marry a man and start her own cooking show, a newly divorced Gender Studies professor who has a hot and cold hookup with a Trump supporter, and a shy Ivy League student who learns the truth about her

    Loved this short story collection, grateful for my Goodreads' friends for pointing me to it. Curtis Sittenfeld gives us several perceptive stories about adults with messy pasts, nuanced relationships, and very real emotions. A few of the stories feature: a woman who sees her old queer fling marry a man and start her own cooking show, a newly divorced Gender Studies professor who has a hot and cold hookup with a Trump supporter, and a shy Ivy League student who learns the truth about her classmate's entrancing, enviable life. Sittenfeld has a talent for creating plots and situations that pulse with a quiet drama that connects you to her characters, even if only for 10 to 20 pages.

    I most appreciated Sittenfeld's empathy for her characters and her intelligence. A lot of these stories focus on suburban lives, of women and men dealing with divorce, gender roles, infidelity, desire for old flames, jealousy, and more. Sittenfeld develops her characters with such skill that their unlikability is human, relatable, and almost comforting in its authenticity. So many times I would finish a story and think "oh wow, it's okay if I don't have my life completely figured out right now, or even when I'm 30, or 40, or ever" and "we really are always learning, making mistakes, and hopefully learning from them." I suspect Sittenfeld draws such distinct, fleshed out characters with so few pages at her disposal through capturing their emotions well. She describes nostalgia, longing, regret, hope, and contentment with great eloquence. Finally, her writing is so smart. Though it feels effortless when read, I can see that the creation of these stories - where they start, how much background to provide about each character, etc. - must require so much finesse and time spent mastering her craft.

    Overall, an excellent short story collection I would recommend to anyone interested in contemporary life, especially the intricacies of relationships throughout the lifespan. As Roxane Gay noted in her review of

    , the book is very white, but I did not mind that much and took it as a sign that Sittenfeld knows how to stay in her lane when it comes to race. I am excited to read more by this author and already reserved another one of her books at my local library.

  • Dianne

    Terrific collection of ten short stories with a very contemporary vibe. The stories explore gender bias and identity, political bias, midlife angst, social awkwardness, the culture of celebrity, social media obsessiveness and competitiveness, ambivalence about motherhood, and mental illness. Lest this sound unappetizing - who wants to be hammered over the head with all THAT stuff? - these stories are gentle, subtle and expertly crafted. Sittenfeld's writing is sublime; her perception is uncanny.

    Terrific collection of ten short stories with a very contemporary vibe. The stories explore gender bias and identity, political bias, midlife angst, social awkwardness, the culture of celebrity, social media obsessiveness and competitiveness, ambivalence about motherhood, and mental illness. Lest this sound unappetizing - who wants to be hammered over the head with all THAT stuff? - these stories are gentle, subtle and expertly crafted. Sittenfeld's writing is sublime; her perception is uncanny. And the humor - it's there, but it's not biting and mean, it's softhearted and knowing.

    I loved all of stories. Sittenfeld brought me up short on one of them and cleverly exposed a bias of my own and made me laugh at myself. If you read this collection, I am referring to "The Prairie Wife" story - I made an assumption I shouldn't have. I bow to her astuteness in setting me up for the fall. I'm sure I won't be the only one!

    I'd only read two of Sittenfeld's works prior to this - "Eligible" (meh) and "Sisterland" (loved!). I have yet to get to "Prep" and "American Wife," but I will definitely be reading those.

    I highly recommend this to those who love perfectly crafted sort stories and gentle social commentary. A 4.5 for me.

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