Star Wars, Vol. 7: The Ashes of Jedha

Star Wars, Vol. 7: The Ashes of Jedha

The possibility-and destruction-of the Death Star has changed everything. The Death Star's destruction proves the Empire is not irresistible. But a Death Star has been built, and it can't happen again. The specter of the Empire's true power has brought together a patchwork cloth of people, united in hope. From the desolation of Jedha to the search for new bases, these rebe...

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Title:Star Wars, Vol. 7: The Ashes of Jedha
Author:Kieron Gillen
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Star Wars, Vol. 7: The Ashes of Jedha Reviews

  • Alejandro

    Writer: Jason Aaron

    Illustrator: Salvador Larroca

    Writer: Jason Aaron

    Illustrator: Salvador Larroca

    After the destruction of the Death Star, it’s obvious that the Empire got quite short of kyber crystals since the most of its reverves were onboard the huge mobile space station, so they need to get more, and the only place is…

    …Jedha.

    But, that particular planet was the first target practice of the dissapeared Death Star, and while it only was hit with the power of one generator…

    …not only Jedha City become dust, but the planet itself got a deep impact creating a gigantic hole, unbalanced not only its atmospheric environment but even…

    …The Force got unbalanced there!

    Saw Gerrera is no more, but his partisans still are fighting in a ruined world, and now with a kinda of unwanted boost of Rebel Alliance forces lead by Leia, along with Luke and Han, the Empire detachment sent there to look for kyber crystals is having a headache to achieve its mission…

    A very tall and massive, uber-brawny, and with a versatile cybernetic arm, Imperial Officer assigned to fix the lack of kyber crystals shipments.

    And along with the mining advisement of Queen Trios of Shu-Torun (previously seen in this comic book run), the new commander in what remains of Jedha, expects to solve the hostile situation soon.

    While Rebels and Partisans battle against the Galactic Empire, their own methods couldn’t be more different, so an “alliance” between the two resistance groups is quite fragile and not easy to make it work against formidable enemies.

    But, don’t forget that Jedha used to be a key Jedi place, not only for the kyber crystals but also for its Jedi temples, and young Luke Skywalker wants to look for any remaining Jedi building for any clue for his already struggled self-training to become a Jedi Knight.

  • Chad

    Keiron Gillen takes over the book from Jason Aaron and delivers a winning tale. In a Rogue One follow-up, Han, Luke, and Leia head to what's left of Jedha to help the local resistance keep the remaining kyber crystals out of the Empire's hand. The story feels a bit stretched at 6 issues. What you will see in every single review here is that everyone hates Salvador Larroca's photo tracing. The faces look almost cut and pasted out of a magazine over the art like a ransom note. It's REALLY distract

    Keiron Gillen takes over the book from Jason Aaron and delivers a winning tale. In a Rogue One follow-up, Han, Luke, and Leia head to what's left of Jedha to help the local resistance keep the remaining kyber crystals out of the Empire's hand. The story feels a bit stretched at 6 issues. What you will see in every single review here is that everyone hates Salvador Larroca's photo tracing. The faces look almost cut and pasted out of a magazine over the art like a ransom note. It's REALLY distracting and looks like something a 10-year old would do when making their own comics.

  • Anthony

    I miss the days when Marvel put good artists on the Star Wars books. I liked Aaron’s run but this book needed a change of writer to help give it some freshness and Gillen is someone I welcome to the title. He’s usually a solid writer and has already worked in the new Star Wars canon before (and he doesn’t waste time bringing in characters from his Darth Vader run).

    But the art really lets this down because it looks shit. Larroca is someone I’ve progressively gone off more and more because of the

    I miss the days when Marvel put good artists on the Star Wars books. I liked Aaron’s run but this book needed a change of writer to help give it some freshness and Gillen is someone I welcome to the title. He’s usually a solid writer and has already worked in the new Star Wars canon before (and he doesn’t waste time bringing in characters from his Darth Vader run).

    But the art really lets this down because it looks shit. Larroca is someone I’ve progressively gone off more and more because of the way he does facial expressions, which is straight up photoshopping them from various shots from the movies in this case. It was less obvious in the Darth Vader book because there were less human characters, so he didn’t do it as much. But every issue I notice a facial expression and I can even remember which scene and which film it’s from (the downside to being a Star Wars obsessive I guess). It’s bringing the book down. He’s reliable and he’s not that bad of a story teller with his art but the faces are really annoying me now.

  • FanboyBen

    Another decent Star Wars story, another five-to-six issues of horrendous Savlador Larroca art…in other words, hey, it’s another “Star Wars” arc! I know there are some people who don’t mind Larroca’s photorealistic style, but me, it’s an immediate turn-off, and serves to consistently and immediately remove me from the story. Which is a real shame, because the story here – by new series writer Kieron Gillen, taking over from where Jason Aaron left off – actually has a lot to offer (essentially, it

    Another decent Star Wars story, another five-to-six issues of horrendous Savlador Larroca art…in other words, hey, it’s another “Star Wars” arc! I know there are some people who don’t mind Larroca’s photorealistic style, but me, it’s an immediate turn-off, and serves to consistently and immediately remove me from the story. Which is a real shame, because the story here – by new series writer Kieron Gillen, taking over from where Jason Aaron left off – actually has a lot to offer (essentially, it’s Rogue One: The Sequel). It’s just a shame that a compelling plot, filled with cool ideas, is held back by such subpar art.

  • Chris Lemmerman

    Kieron Gillen graduates from Darth Vader and Doctor Aphra to the main Star Wars series as Luke, Leia, and Han head to the remains of the planet Jedha, destroyed during the events of Star Wars: Rogue One.

    I've really enjoyed all of Gillen's entries into the Star Wars universe so far, which makes the slow start to this one a bit baffling. It takes three or so issues before things really seem to get going. It's not like Gillen needs to establish these characters, or recap the events of Rogue One, bu

    Kieron Gillen graduates from Darth Vader and Doctor Aphra to the main Star Wars series as Luke, Leia, and Han head to the remains of the planet Jedha, destroyed during the events of Star Wars: Rogue One.

    I've really enjoyed all of Gillen's entries into the Star Wars universe so far, which makes the slow start to this one a bit baffling. It takes three or so issues before things really seem to get going. It's not like Gillen needs to establish these characters, or recap the events of Rogue One, but it all feels a bit sluggish until about midway through. There's also really no point in Luke's 'I'm going to do what I want because Jedi stuff' thing showing up again, because he's done it at least twice under Aaron and it's getting a tad tedious.

    The second half moves a lot brisker however, especially once we get to the nitty gritty of what Rogue One's story teaches Luke, Leia, and Han. I also really like the involvement of Queen Trios of Shu-Torun, from Gillen's aforementioned Darth Vader run. I hope we see more of her going forward.

    The art is another drawback; I've liked Salvador Larroca on previous Star Wars books too, but here he seems a lot more photo-tracey than usual. It wouldn't be that distracting, but it looks like the bodies of the characters and the faces are drawn in different styles, so it makes the faces stand out even more, and not for a good reason.

    A combination of two Star Wars veterans doesn't quite measure up as well as we'd like; let's hope their next arc works a bit better.

  • Travis Duke

    More middle of the road star wars. Gillen took over from Aaron and to be honest I can't really tell. The characters are so established that there isn't much marvel or disney is going to let an author do creatively (I'm guessing here). The story has a pretty big tie into Rogue one and the previous Shu-torun stuff, which was fun. Other than that the book is sort of mediocre. Larocca on art, I used to like him more but now his realism is sort of creepy to me in some panels.

  • Quentin

    Character's faces in this book have a strange finish applied which throws them into the uncanny valley. I think the artist was going for a photorealistic look (i.e. Alex Ross or Greg Land), but they failed miserably.

  • Neil Coulter

    Quick and instantly forgettable--yep, another Star Wars graphic novel.

    This one has a lot of references to

    , which is good, since that's the best that Star Wars has been in the current era. But as is usually the case with these graphic novels, the story is really unnecessary. I don't know what's going on with the artist, but every single frame of Han is so obviously a shot from the movies, it's really laughably, distractingly bad. If the book had interesting art, I could probably overloo

    Quick and instantly forgettable--yep, another Star Wars graphic novel.

    This one has a lot of references to

    , which is good, since that's the best that Star Wars has been in the current era. But as is usually the case with these graphic novels, the story is really unnecessary. I don't know what's going on with the artist, but every single frame of Han is so obviously a shot from the movies, it's really laughably, distractingly bad. If the book had interesting art, I could probably overlook the shortcomings in the story itself.

    Because it's a Star Wars story, Leia says inspiring words about "hope" a couple of times. And because the story includes some remnants of Saw Gerrera's group, people talk about "keeping the dream alive" a couple of times. The galaxy is rather limited in what people can say. But it's getting less restrictive about "damn" and "hell." I felt there was far too much of that in this book.

    I also noticed in this story that Luke is wildly inconsistent in his opinion on when it's okay to slaughter "bad guys" and when it's a horrific thing to do. He gets upset at Benthic (Two Tubes) for killing Imperials, but he has no qualms about killing a bunch of stormtroopers with his lightsaber, or driving a city-sized machine, full of people, into an abyss, or killing a force-user just moments after he seems to have turned bad (but it's all very confusing). And this is a guy who recently killed over a million people by destroying the Death Star. This is a significant issue, and I wish it were being dealt with more deliberately.

    I'm thankful for the public library. Can you imagine spending money on this stuff?

  • Sam Quixote

    The Screaming Citadel was as big a flashing red warning sign as there could’ve been that Kieron Gillen was NOT the writer to be taking over Star Wars from Jason Aaron and yet he still did. And The Ashes of Jedha is as terrible as The Screaming Citadel was. Right again, Marvel!

    The Empire want to mine kyber crystals (aka lightsaber batteries) from the ruins of Jedha - that planet from Rogue One - and Rebels show up to stop them. Luke, Leia, Han, Chewie act as predictably as the plot plays out. Th

    The Screaming Citadel was as big a flashing red warning sign as there could’ve been that Kieron Gillen was NOT the writer to be taking over Star Wars from Jason Aaron and yet he still did. And The Ashes of Jedha is as terrible as The Screaming Citadel was. Right again, Marvel!

    The Empire want to mine kyber crystals (aka lightsaber batteries) from the ruins of Jedha - that planet from Rogue One - and Rebels show up to stop them. Luke, Leia, Han, Chewie act as predictably as the plot plays out. The real conflict comes from keeping your eyes open when reading this rubbish!

    There are some pointless references to Rogue One and the new characters are bland, boring nobodies I didn’t care about. I guess Salvador Larroca’s art is ok though I hated how fucking weird most of the characters’ faces looked - like Larroca couldn’t be bothered to draw them so he used real life models/movie stills, slapped a shit Instagram filter over them and stuck them in?? It looks so ugly!

    Marvel, if you’re listening, it’s time to stop with these awful stories featuring the original cast. Let’s spotlight some new characters, new settings, a new era - let’s start taking some risks instead of grinding out more of this unexciting, play-it-safe crapola, ok?

    Don’t get burned by Star Wars, Volume 7: The Ashes of Jedha - avoid!

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