Rookie on Love

Rookie on Love

A single-subject anthology about the heart's most powerful emotion, edited by Tavi Gevinson. Featuring exclusive, never-before-seen essays, poems, comics, and interviews from contributors like Jenny Zhang, Emma Straub, Hilton Als, Janet Mock, John Green, Rainbow Rowell, Gabourey Sidibe, Mitski, Alessia Cara, Etgar Keret, Margo Jefferson, Sarah Manguso, Durga Chew-Bose, and...

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Title:Rookie on Love
Author:Tavi Gevinson
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Rookie on Love Reviews

  • Pip

    Really, really enjoyed this. As expected, I got a lot more out of some essays than others. But this is a perfect collection of stories and essays for teenagers and twenty-somethings. I'll be re-reading it again for sure! Some of the essays were incredibly beautifully written, inspiring, concise and made me reflect on THINGS, MANY THINGS.

  • sara

    To touch on one subject that is written a ton about and to have me come away with new ways of thinking and new perspectives is something to be excited about. Even though this book was about love, a topic I try and avoid it in fiction, I found myself thoroughly enjoying this anthology. It was about love, but it was about more than love. The surface level that we all know, of romantic love, this book made me realize I am surrounded in love, bathed in love, because I have my family and I have mysel

    To touch on one subject that is written a ton about and to have me come away with new ways of thinking and new perspectives is something to be excited about. Even though this book was about love, a topic I try and avoid it in fiction, I found myself thoroughly enjoying this anthology. It was about love, but it was about more than love. The surface level that we all know, of romantic love, this book made me realize I am surrounded in love, bathed in love, because I have my family and I have myself. I may not be dating anyone, but this book made me realize that romantic love is NOT the most important of types of love. Some essays I enjoyed less and couldn't connect to, but as a whole, this book spoke to me on a deep level. A beautiful, at times vivid, contemplative book, that I will return to again and again when I feel loveless. Because I am most definitely not.

  • Emily (Obsessed Reader)

    DISCLAIMER: I did not read every single story in this anthology. My rating is based on the stories I chose to read. I truthfully only picked up this book because of a few specifics authors, and I decided to read the stories that I was excited about. I browsed through the rest of the book and also read some others that caught my attention. Something that I thought was REALLY cool is that the book featured different storytelling techniques like illustrated stories (graphic novel style), poetry, an

    DISCLAIMER: I did not read every single story in this anthology. My rating is based on the stories I chose to read. I truthfully only picked up this book because of a few specifics authors, and I decided to read the stories that I was excited about. I browsed through the rest of the book and also read some others that caught my attention. Something that I thought was REALLY cool is that the book featured different storytelling techniques like illustrated stories (graphic novel style), poetry, and even conversations between people. Some of the content seemed to be too aimed at adolescents for me, but I think this is really great for readers in middle and high school. However, there is content for us older kids too. The whole thing is set up pretty cool with all the different authors and storytelling styles. I would recommend it based on what I read.

  • Nat

    A single-subject anthology about the heart's most powerful emotion, edited by Tavi Gevinson. Touching upon love in all its different variations, from “a devotional to dogs” (Durga Chew-Bose) to unrequited love to accepting your self-worth to experiencing intimate friendships with women.

    A single-subject anthology about the heart's most powerful emotion, edited by Tavi Gevinson. Touching upon love in all its different variations, from “a devotional to dogs” (Durga Chew-Bose) to unrequited love to accepting your self-worth to experiencing intimate friendships with women.

    Before starting, I casually browsed through the table of contents and saw a stellar piece titled

    by Jazmine Hughes, which I hurried on to read because it was something I really needed. And it was just as spectacular as the title conveys, featuring a group text between a bunch of sisters.

    When I then saw that Tavi Gevinson had

    a live reading of this hilarious and touching piece, I was over-the-moon.

    All I need now is the return of the

    , which I raved about back in

    of 2017.

    , however, didn't quite embody the expectations I had in mind before starting. More than once I experienced the feeling of really enjoying how a story builds up but then, almost without fail, it would veer off downhill, destroying what it had created in its small space, and end on a completely unsatisfying note. And because of the short length, there wasn't even a redeeming moment that could've saved the narrative.

    It also didn't help the collection of hitting a rough patch in the middle, where none of the essays held my attention and consequently failed to raise any emotion out of me (I mean, other than bitter rage at a certain line in Collier Meyerson's piece I landed upon while randomly flipping through the collection)... Thankfully though, when I finally reached Victoria Chiu's written piece, which came in to save the day, as she touches upon her choice to abstain from "(penetrative) sex." As well as other standout pieces in here that I'd like to feature, such as:

    by Tova Benjamin, talking about relationships in the digital age:

    by Etgar Keret. A quick story on life after experiencing your highest high.

    by Jenny Zhang. One of the most important pieces, talking about how love and respect need to go hand in hand, which I also heard a lecture on a few months back and it completely changed my viewpoint.

    a conversation between Rainbow Rowell and John Green, “YA powerhouses on writing epic—yet real—teen love.” I can listen to Rainbow Rowell for eternity, as you can tell by my extensive review of my all-time favorite book of hers,

    .

    by Tavi Gevinson, on trying to capture the feelings as they occur.

    I wholeheartedly enjoyed this piece by Tavi, wherein she managed to create a solid grip on her relationship with this goofy grinning guy in just one page.

    Overall, I'd say I came to appreciate most of all the pieces that exposed my innermost feelings so successfully that it made me reflect a lot. So even though the collection as a whole was mainly a hit or miss with its forty-something stories, I still came to cherish a handful of pieces.

    ,

    Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with

  • Sophie

    I love the Rookie books and make a point of collecting every single one. Each Rookie Yearbook promised different stories, poems, and comics about various parts of growing up, and the formatting made for an aesthetically-pleasing read. Although I was somewhat excited to see that Rookie was continuing to branch off and make new books, the format of this new book, for me, was entirely different--and kind of paling in comparison to the Rookie Yearbook's glory.

    Instead of a wide, colorful book filled

    I love the Rookie books and make a point of collecting every single one. Each Rookie Yearbook promised different stories, poems, and comics about various parts of growing up, and the formatting made for an aesthetically-pleasing read. Although I was somewhat excited to see that Rookie was continuing to branch off and make new books, the format of this new book, for me, was entirely different--and kind of paling in comparison to the Rookie Yearbook's glory.

    Instead of a wide, colorful book filled with pictures and a lot of different diverse articles, we have a small, paperback-sized anthology all on the same subject-- this one being "Love". At first, I was excited. After all, it was another Rookie book! The format itself seemed interesting, but the issue with it was that with a format such as this one, you were putting a lot of pressure on the essays and poems themselves rather than just the surrounding aesthetics, unlike previous Rookie books, and this book appears to look like one you'd read cover-to-cover, unlike preview Rookie books which felt more like a magazine where you would read the articles that stood out to you and pick and choose. The problem with this is that the essays and stories had to be impressive in order to gain and keep a reader's attention--and for this book, 75% of them were not very interesting.

    Although I can usually connect with Rookie books, this one offered only a few works which actually resonated with me. The personal essays about the individual's struggles with love, etc., were ones that I especially could not bring myself to enjoy. The prose itself was beautiful but at times too poetical, taking away from the actual story the person was telling. At other times I felt like I was slogging through a swamp of foreign references and angsty analogies. I don't mean to sound rude, as I admire any writers and contributors who got their work published in here, but there was just a LOT of essays with this kind of flowery writing I couldn't connect to.

    The parts I

    enjoy were the informative "advice"-type essays which were straightforward and thoughtful, e.g. "Under Pressure" by Victoria Chiu or "How to Confess Your Crush" by Krista Burton. A few of the poems were good as well--"Postcards from Apollo 6" by Lena Blackmon being my favourite. However, these were few and far between, and the personal essays took up a good three-fourths of the book.

    It wasn't my favourite read and I am missing the old Rookie Yearbooks already. Still, it is worth at least three stars for its creativity, uniqueness and the fact it's another Rookie book.

  • Caleb

    Been making my way through this for a few weeks now and it was just okay. I liked the message, but didn’t relate to it personally.

  • Deimaris ☾

    I've got to say that I am a bit disappointed with this collection, I just didn't care for much of the essays or stories. Don't get me wrong, I really liked like ten of them but the rest didn't do much for me, I even skimmed through some of the long ones. This just wasn't what I expected, it didn't feel like a book about love or self care, it felt like random toxic stories. This was supposed to be helpful, it had the potential to be so much more but it lacked love.

  • Rebecca

    While this collection is diverse and interesting enough to an adult reader ... this is pretty inaccessible to the intended teenage audience. Teenage readers are not going to slog through intellectualized self evicerations about some adult musing about their 20something love screw up. They aren’t going to take time to look up or understand the use of words like ontological. This should have targeted college students and other emerging adults - not teens.

    And according to the third story presented,

    While this collection is diverse and interesting enough to an adult reader ... this is pretty inaccessible to the intended teenage audience. Teenage readers are not going to slog through intellectualized self evicerations about some adult musing about their 20something love screw up. They aren’t going to take time to look up or understand the use of words like ontological. This should have targeted college students and other emerging adults - not teens.

    And according to the third story presented, you can’t see past versions of websites .... but you can ... just use the Internet Archive’s Way Back Machine if you’re interested .. it’s free.

  • Narrative Muse

    – Rookie on Love questions what it means to love and be loved. –

    ROOKIE!

    It's the answer to what my once teenage self needed, and the best digital magazine for young women. The voice of Rookie is one of a friend articulated in pixels and print. It’s teenagers writing for teenagers. Women writing for women. When I learnt of their newest collection, Rookie On Love, I was giddy with anticipation. Unlike Rookie’s first four books – huge multimedia ‘yearbooks’ that compiled the best art and writing fro

    – Rookie on Love questions what it means to love and be loved. –

    ROOKIE!

    It's the answer to what my once teenage self needed, and the best digital magazine for young women. The voice of Rookie is one of a friend articulated in pixels and print. It’s teenagers writing for teenagers. Women writing for women. When I learnt of their newest collection, Rookie On Love, I was giddy with anticipation. Unlike Rookie’s first four books – huge multimedia ‘yearbooks’ that compiled the best art and writing from their site – Rookie on Love is an easy paperback of original essays, interviews, stories, poetry, and comics on the heart's most powerful emotion, love.

    What does it mean to write ‘on love’. A brief that is, all at once, simple and simply terrifying. Singer-songwriter Mitski Miyawaki wrote about her love for music. Actress Marlo Thomas wrote on finding love in all facets of her life. Durga Chew-Bose wrote about her love for her dog.

    Britney Franco’s essay ‘Only Shallow’ chronicles a relationship and questions what it means to truly know someone else. She writes in the second person, so every ‘you’ she spoke of made me feel like it was a version of myself who was falling in love the way that teenagers do. Not in the way we see in movies or on television, but in small and mundane ways – watching one another in physics class, skateboarding, sitting in adolescent bedrooms (posters on the walls, crumbs in the sheets) listening to music. The kind of love that spans the era of high school – defined by hours, days, weeks, semesters, years.

    I found my mind mostly musing on the poetry that peppers the collection. ‘Astaghfirullah: A Kiss Before Dying’ by Bassey Ikpi is an ode to sex and sexuality, Florence Welch’s simple yet startling poem ‘Monster’ speaks of the nature of creativity, and how we take intimate moments, late night conversations and articulate them in art. And Marina Sage Carlstroem’s poem ‘2am at the Ramen Shop and I’m Trying to Say I Love You’ is a reminder of how intimacy finds us in unlikely places.

    If I was to write on love, maybe I’d find myself sifting through my journals seeing what I wrote about again and again and again. My love of reading, of writing, my love for my best friend, my husband, the love that lies in the banter and bicker of time spent with my siblings. Maybe my love for teaching, for coffee in the mornings. Or my love for riding my bike home in the middle of a summer’s night, drunk and wild and free. I don’t know what I would write about if I was to write on love, but Rookie On Love reminded me of the love that leaks like light into my life.

    ----------

    This review was first published on Narrative Muse,

    , and was written by Laura Oosterbeek. Narrative Muse curates the best books and movies by and about women and non-binary folk on our website

    and our social media channels.

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