Bygone Badass Broads: 52 Forgotten Women Who Changed the World

Bygone Badass Broads: 52 Forgotten Women Who Changed the World

Based on Mackenzi Lee’s popular weekly Twitter series of the same name, Bygone Badass Broads features 52 remarkable and forgotten trailblazing women from all over the world. With tales of heroism and cunning, in-depth bios and witty storytelling, Bygone Badass Broads gives new life to these historic female pioneers. Starting in the fifth century BC and continuing to the pr...

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Title:Bygone Badass Broads: 52 Forgotten Women Who Changed the World
Author:Mackenzi Lee
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Bygone Badass Broads: 52 Forgotten Women Who Changed the World Reviews

  • Inge

    If someone ever tells you that you "fight like a girl", you better believe that's a damn compliment. These ladies were

    . Not just physically, but politically, socially, intellectually. Badass broads indeed. What a great and interesting read.

  • Marty :} (thecursedbooks)

    You can read my review on my blog as well (for better formatting, lol) -

    I really loved this book, I especially adored how inclusive it was. If you’re worried that this book might have white feminism plastered all over it, I’m here to ease your worries, it’s very intersectional.

    The illustrations were breath-taking and the stories were funny, very girl-power-y and at the end, you really wanted to discover more about those women who had been forgotten.

    I think Mackenzi Lee did a great job with

    You can read my review on my blog as well (for better formatting, lol) -

    I really loved this book, I especially adored how inclusive it was. If you’re worried that this book might have white feminism plastered all over it, I’m here to ease your worries, it’s very intersectional.

    The illustrations were breath-taking and the stories were funny, very girl-power-y and at the end, you really wanted to discover more about those women who had been forgotten.

    I think Mackenzi Lee did a great job with the research for this book, her stories for each woman were detailed enough to give you a clear image of her life, even when there weren’t enough information, Lee gave us her own hypothesises and it was really well done.

    This book also made me interested in making my own research about so many interesting historical figures, that I had no idea about prior to reading it.

    It had a lot of sexism included since these women that were discussed had been smashing the patriarchy left and right. So, be careful at that, you’re going to be frustrated a lot at all these ladies having their authorities undermined again and again because they were born with a vagina.

    There were also some bookish ladies that were mentioned, which made me incredibly happy because who doesn’t love to read about fellow bookworms that changed the world???

    What I loved the most about this book was how it really made you beam at all those women who accomplished so many things and then also be so angry at our society for forgetting them, for letting men claim their accomplishments instead or minimize their importance in history.

    It also made you feel like you could one day become a badass broad yourself. Because us, girls, we have so much potential, we’re so damn powerful and this book really inspired this feeling in me.

    I think you all need to read this book because it’s absolutely lovely with all these stories of women who lead their countries to war, who created art, who were brave and inventive and dared to change the world.

    I’ve read similar books before and I would say that if you want a fast read about feminism, with illustrations and strong women who kick ass, you should choose this one because it’s witty, the stories are not too short to make you feel like you’re not getting all the information needed, nor too long if you’re an impatient person who doesn’t read a lot of nonfiction.

    SOME OF MY FAVOURITE BADASS BROADS

    Hatshepsut, who was Egypt’s First Femal Pharaoh – wanna thank Abrams for sending me a pin that represents her because she was one of my favourites. She was so powerful and it was so heartbreaking that her stepson took all credit for everything she did.

    Queen Arawelo, her story is full of changing everything about the patriarchy. Under her dominion, women took charge of Somalia and men stayed home, cleaned and took care of the children. Hail Queen smashing the ‘tradition roles’ (yikes).

    Khutulun – this girl promised to marry the person who won a wrestling match against her (spoiler : no one won because she was super BADASS, I want to be her).

    Sayyida Al-Hurra – PIRATE QUEEN, THAT’S ALL I HAVE TO SAY.

    Julie D’Aubigny – La Maupin – my bisexual queen who had too many hobbies to mention, but she is absolutely amazing (she was a swordswoman, a opera singer)

    and more, really I just selected some from the first 50 pages. this whole book is full of amazing women. just go and read it.

  • Tran Thanh Tu

    This is kind of a new experience for me, reading non-fiction books is not really my thing, until

    .

    This is a book comprised of inspiring women throughout history who somehow did not get enough public attention, and to me, it is amazing that this book did its job well, giving the rightful dedication to all these wonderful ladies. They should all be hailed and remembered for their amazing doings throughout history.

    And my reaction throughout this book? Might as well be summarized with these two w

    This is kind of a new experience for me, reading non-fiction books is not really my thing, until

    .

    This is a book comprised of inspiring women throughout history who somehow did not get enough public attention, and to me, it is amazing that this book did its job well, giving the rightful dedication to all these wonderful ladies. They should all be hailed and remembered for their amazing doings throughout history.

    And my reaction throughout this book? Might as well be summarized with these two words:

  • Amalia Gavea

    Outstanding, brilliantly beautiful work by Mackenzi Lee. I cannot begin to tell you how much I loved this book in which she presents 52 women who deserve to be much more famous than they are. Women from all over the world, women

    Outstanding, brilliantly beautiful work by Mackenzi Lee. I cannot begin to tell you how much I loved this book in which she presents 52 women who deserve to be much more famous than they are. Women from all over the world, women of every race and social status that achieved miniscule things such as overthrowing dictators, curing diseases, resisting oppression, doubting and crushing every gender stereotypes of a male-dominated world.

    Lee writes in a comprehensive, direct and concise way, presenting the facts in engaging, fun language. The humorous tidbits are tasteful and delightful without becoming sarcastic or rude. Having in mind that a number of these glorious women’s lives are a mix of fact, fiction and hear-say, Lee’s task becomes even more demanding but sha passes the test with flying colours. She doesn’t build ‘’loud’’ pedestals but composes short, comprehensive biographies of women who vary from heroines, to leaders, to athletes, to criminals. Intelligent, dangerous, brave, alluring but, most importantly, fiercely determined to earn the right to live according to their rules, resisting and breaking the bars of patriarchy and prejudice.

    The 52 women are all marvelous, but here are my absolute favourites:

    Empress Xi Ling Shi, the woman who discovered sericulture and invented the silk loom, creating the legendary Silk Road that still continues to excite our imagination. She became a Chinese deity for her efforts. Not bad…

    Hatshepsut, the first female Pharaoh, who took the throne after her husband’s death- because she could- and ruled her people in prosperity for 22 years.

    Agnodice, the woman who disguised herlself as a man to practice medicine in Ancient Athens. And guess what? She succeeded in the end because Athenian women are made of wonders.

    Arawelo, a legendary queen of Somalia, who discarded every gender stereotype by creating a government consisting entirely of women. At the same time, she and her awesome cabinet showed the men what taking care of a household truly demands.

    Queen Christina of Sweden. Naturally, Sweden would have one of the coolest monarchs ever. Peacemaker, protector of the Arts, advocate of religious equality, hater of matrimony and all-around awesome person. No surprise really given her homeland.

    Mariya Oktyabrskaya, an extraordinary woman from Russia who blew the guts of many Nazi scums to pieces while inside her very own tank, aptly named Fighting Girlfriend. She took part in the Battle of Kursk, enough said.

    Irena Sendler, a Polish nurse who fought against religious discrimination from an early age and saved more than 2,500 Jewish children from the nightmare of the ghetto during WWII.

    Azucena Villaflor, an Argentinian mother, who organised the first demonstrations against the ‘’disappearances’’ ( the desaparecidos) of young people who were deemed ‘’rebels’’ by the military dictatorship of the country during the 70s. And we all know what it means to ‘’disappear’’ when fascists are in power, don’t we?

    Petra Eriksson has created 52 absolutely beautiful portraits of each woman,painted in bold colours in a style combining pop art and poster illustrations. Fabulous!

    Can you tell that I fell utterly in love with this book? I think you can and I urge you to read it, keep it in your collection as one of the jewels of your bookcase, a treasure of courage, empowerment and the fervent, everlasting fight and determination of women who succeeded on their own terms and became pioneers in their fields.

    My reviews can also be found on

  • Nat

    Though I was struggling a bit at the start of this book with the super casual language used for chronicling each historic woman, I realized (rather quickly, thankfully!) that the modern take on these badass broads is exactly what makes this read that more approachable and original.

    My issue with previous feminist collections always stemmed from the fact that they came to read like Wikipedia-esque entries and as a result failed to keep me engaged. Which is why I came to like the shorter biography

    Though I was struggling a bit at the start of this book with the super casual language used for chronicling each historic woman, I realized (rather quickly, thankfully!) that the modern take on these badass broads is exactly what makes this read that more approachable and original.

    My issue with previous feminist collections always stemmed from the fact that they came to read like Wikipedia-esque entries and as a result failed to keep me engaged. Which is why I came to like the shorter biography summaries, such as 

     by Julia Pierpont & 

    by Ann Shen.

    So Mackenzi Lee's intriguing take on these "badass patriarchy smashers" in

    helped keep them in mind long after I continued to the next entry.

    So here is a taste of some of the memorable Badass Broads squad members:

     C. 15 CE, Somalia

    The little poem there had me giggling out loud, which is the last thing I expected from a Nonfiction/History book. Having Lee succeed not only at educating us about the lesser-known women of our times but actually making it enjoyable while doing so is the biggest accomplishment, in my eyes.

     1260–1306, Mongolia

    This particular entry had me giddy with the many pop-culture references*. It's quite a feat on the author's part to connect present day to hundreds upon hundreds of years ago, so I will continually applaud her for that.

    *Phrases include:

    ,

    , and the timeless reference at the end of this passage:

    Cue: The Lonely Island's

    .

    1818–1894, United States

    This unheard of

    was a true surprise for me.

    1860–1927, United States

    This entry screamed for a reference to be made to the Pawnee Goddesses from 

    (which I did a whole

    about). And thankfully Mackenzi Lee delivered at the very end with this closing line:

     1882–1935, Germany

    It seems appropriate to note that with this entry I came to see the unshakable commitment to bringing the most color and vibrancy out of these historical women. And it was a delight to discover this time and again in this gorgeously illustrated compendium.

    Oh, but before I leave I have to include a few other phrases I got a good laugh at, such as giving Irena Sendler's dog a

    worthy rate (“12/10, would pet.”), using the infamous *record scratch* in Sarah Breedlove's entry, and comparing Kumander Liwayway's childhood to that of “a Disney Channel teenager.”

    There's so much more I'd like to share, but calling it a day on this note seems like a fine endpoint.

    ,

    Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with

  • April (Aprilius Maximus)

    *4.5 stars*

    Wonderful, wonderful, wonderful.

  • Trevor

    For the most part, I enjoyed this. I hadn't heard of the majority of the women so it was great gaining knowledge for the first time instead of reiterating it. [For example: I personally owe so much to Ursula Nordstrom because without her CHARLOTTE'S WEB wouldn't have existed.) The amount of diversity is wonderful. The artwork is stunningly gorgeous & makes it worth checking out for that alone.

    But besides that, I had qualms that kept it from being a 5* read. When I'm reading nonfiction I app

    For the most part, I enjoyed this. I hadn't heard of the majority of the women so it was great gaining knowledge for the first time instead of reiterating it. [For example: I personally owe so much to Ursula Nordstrom because without her CHARLOTTE'S WEB wouldn't have existed.) The amount of diversity is wonderful. The artwork is stunningly gorgeous & makes it worth checking out for that alone.

    But besides that, I had qualms that kept it from being a 5* read. When I'm reading nonfiction I appreciate the author leaving out their personal opinions. That didn't happen here. BYGONE BADASS BROADS is so heavily biased it's difficult to finish without choking on eye rolls. I'm not trying to diminish the accomplishments of these women but this book seriously makes it sound like men were the cause root of every problem, save for a couple "good ones." There also weren't any facts to back up these theories; I would have liked to draw conclusions for myself rather than be told what feelings I should have for someone. Granted, I haven't been paying attention to Lee's Twitter feed (which this is based off), but this just seems like one big rant & it's discouraging because these are such powerful women, why not show that through powerful writing that displays actions, not emotions. This isn't a contemporary.

    Would still recommend, but I hope more books come out like this without being bogged down by opinions I honestly couldn't care less about.

  • Elise (TheBookishActress)

    things I love:

    ➽ Mackenzi Lee

    ➽ historical fiction

    ➽ girls

    things this book will contain:

    ➽ Mackenzi Lee

    ➽ historical fiction

    ➽ girls

  • ✨    jamieson   ✨

    Name 1 non fiction book I've been more excited for

    You can't???

    MACKENZI LEES TWITTER THREADS ABOUT HISTORY ARE THE BEST THIS IS GONNA BE THE BEST

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