They Say Blue

They Say Blue

Caldecott and Printz Honor-winning illustrator Jillian Tamaki brings us a poetic exploration of colour and nature from a young child’s point of view. They Say Blue follows a young girl as she contemplates colours in the known and the unknown, in the immediate world and the world beyond what she can see. The sea looks blue, yet water cupped in her hands is as clear as glass...

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Title:They Say Blue
Author:Jillian Tamaki
Rating:

They Say Blue Reviews

  • Christopher

    Here’s your first 2019 Caldecott contender.

  • Dani

    I LOVE this one more than words can say. To so fully capture the magic of both colours and childhood? Jillian, you're amazing.

  • Kris

    I just read this book to a class of kindergarten kids and it was a true winner. First of all the art is gorgeous - so cool to see the range that Tamaki has after enjoying some of her older works like

    . Also the connections to key concepts for younger kids were perfect - colors and seasons and family. The pictures are rich and the text is sparse which keeps the book moving nicely. A lovely read for the young ones.

  • emma

    Oh, this is so beautiful. Yes, as reviewed, the narrative is less a narrative and more contemplative, but the sounds of the words combined with the art is actually breathtaking. It's full of movement, yet at the same time still and calming. This is so gorgeous.

  • Rebecca

    An expressive, quiet first picture book from Jillian Tamaki (This One Summer). As the Kirkus review said, "Neither exactly a book about colors nor exactly a book about seasons, this is a reminder to slow down, savor the present, notice small details, and relish childlike wonder."

  • Boni

    A gorgeous book. Wow. But it was a little too broad- a lack of focus (colors, seasons, feelings, the character becoming a tree for four spreads, existential questions...so much here!) and a jumpy narrative muddy it up too much or me. A tighter focus would have made it shine. Still, a lovely book with a lot to say.

  • Jordan Henrichs

    This is a beautiful book. From illustrations to text, through and through. My only complaint is a really, really picky one... the whole voice/concept of the text confused me. Who is "they?" Is there any question that the items illustrated are the colors the author includes? The whole, "they say" thread throughout the book seems to imply that the narrator sees something different than others do, but she doesn't. She looks at the sea and sees blue. She knows her blood is red. Etc, etc, etc. I just

    This is a beautiful book. From illustrations to text, through and through. My only complaint is a really, really picky one... the whole voice/concept of the text confused me. Who is "they?" Is there any question that the items illustrated are the colors the author includes? The whole, "they say" thread throughout the book seems to imply that the narrator sees something different than others do, but she doesn't. She looks at the sea and sees blue. She knows her blood is red. Etc, etc, etc. I just didn't understand who "they" was. "They say," implies that the narrator is questioning the colors around her, but instead she seems to be admiring the colors. Very picky of me though, for such a vibrant, clever book.

    And it seems like every picture book I read lately is about the passing of the seasons! This one pulls it off.

  • M. Lauritano

    In a deliberate shift towards a child friendly art style, Jillian Tamaki has made a book filled with sensuous illustrations structured by a progression of colors. Unfortunately, the text doesn’t live up to her artistic prowess. It is absent of anything like a story, which might not have been a problem if the book had been subtitled “a poem” or if she had completely abandoned the notion of a consistent character that suggests a narrative trajectory. Instead, readers are left to wade through a ser

    In a deliberate shift towards a child friendly art style, Jillian Tamaki has made a book filled with sensuous illustrations structured by a progression of colors. Unfortunately, the text doesn’t live up to her artistic prowess. It is absent of anything like a story, which might not have been a problem if the book had been subtitled “a poem” or if she had completely abandoned the notion of a consistent character that suggests a narrative trajectory. Instead, readers are left to wade through a series of quasi-poetic observations that don’t amount to a lasting memorable meaning. Jillian Tamaki has certainly proven herself as a capable and witty storyteller with works geared at older readers. Where did that version of her disappear to in the text of this book?

  • Crystal

    Gorgeous!

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