Hey, Kiddo

Hey, Kiddo

Hey, Kiddo is the graphic memoir of author-illustrator Jarrett J. Krosoczka. Raised by his colorful grandparents, who adopted him because his mother was an incarcerated heroin addict, Krosoczka didn't know his father's name until he saw his birth certificate when registering for a school ski trip. Hey, Kiddo traces Krosoczka's search for his father, his difficult interacti...

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Title:Hey, Kiddo
Author:Jarrett J. Krosoczka
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Hey, Kiddo Reviews

  • Matthew Noe

    I received an advance copy of this at ALA 2018.

    Hey, Kiddo is an incredibly timely comic about a addiction, family, and resilience. Drawn in an almost hazy style with purposeful use of burnt colors, the artwork makes you FEEL the story rather than reading-from-above. Jarrett is honest - at times unflatteringly so - and that honesty gives weight to the story, even if in the moment it might feel too much.

    If no one else takes it up, I may write a more in-depth review for graphic medicine. But for n

    I received an advance copy of this at ALA 2018.

    Hey, Kiddo is an incredibly timely comic about a addiction, family, and resilience. Drawn in an almost hazy style with purposeful use of burnt colors, the artwork makes you FEEL the story rather than reading-from-above. Jarrett is honest - at times unflatteringly so - and that honesty gives weight to the story, even if in the moment it might feel too much.

    If no one else takes it up, I may write a more in-depth review for graphic medicine. But for now, I have two claims to make.

    First, this is going to be one of my picks of the year for the field. Few comics targeted to young adults are this honest and open about addiction. And as the "opioid crisis" and long overdue national attention kn addiction ramps up, we need honest stories. There's already enough fearmongering, misinformstion, and downright ill-will toward addiction. Maybe stories like Hey, Kiddo can bring some humanity back into the conversation. I hope.

    Second, because the comic doesn't shy away from drug use, teenage misadventures, and includes cursing, I'm expecting this book will face serious challenges from parents who think kids should be sheltered. I hope I'm wrong but given how much more appealing a banned book becomes maybe I want to be right - then it's sure to be read.

    Full disclosure: I live in Worcester and seeing the place depicted in comics positively is certainly making me enjoy this even more.

  • Jen Petro-Roy

    Utterly phenomenal. Krosoczka takes his talent to a whole new and utterly personal level.

  • Jessica

    After just a few pages of this book, I wanted to find Jarrett Krosoczka and hug him. Just . . . hug him for a minute. I met him, got my book signed, he was so nice! And handsome, and well dressed! And I was like, Hey, what a great guy! Love those New Jedi Academy books! But now, having read this raw and wonderful memoir of his childhood . . . I just want to hug him. This book is every bit as amazing as you've heard. I want it to win all the awards, because I want everyone to read it. I want it t

    After just a few pages of this book, I wanted to find Jarrett Krosoczka and hug him. Just . . . hug him for a minute. I met him, got my book signed, he was so nice! And handsome, and well dressed! And I was like, Hey, what a great guy! Love those New Jedi Academy books! But now, having read this raw and wonderful memoir of his childhood . . . I just want to hug him. This book is every bit as amazing as you've heard. I want it to win all the awards, because I want everyone to read it. I want it to be assigned to students. This is the perfect marriage of words and pictures, in addition to being such an engrossing story. I'm just so glad that Jarrett had his grandparents, his extended family to love him. I'm so glad that he has a wife and kids of his own now. I just think he deserves all the hugs, okay?

  • Cassie Thomas

    I understand that when others read this book they may only focus on the fact that there is so much darkness, but from someone who experienced similar circumstances as a child and into adulthood - there was brightness in the fact that grandparents raised us, but the negative light that shone of biological parents was just that, negative. As someone who could relate to a lot of scenes in Hey, Kiddo, I am thankful to know that my experiences are who shaped me, just like Jarrett, I'm also thankful t

    I understand that when others read this book they may only focus on the fact that there is so much darkness, but from someone who experienced similar circumstances as a child and into adulthood - there was brightness in the fact that grandparents raised us, but the negative light that shone of biological parents was just that, negative. As someone who could relate to a lot of scenes in Hey, Kiddo, I am thankful to know that my experiences are who shaped me, just like Jarrett, I'm also thankful to know that the emotions I felt/feel are completely justified and "normal". There will be teenagers and adults who will NEED this book and there will be others who don't understand, and that's OK. It doesn't take away from the fact that Jarrett shared what shaped him in a beautiful memoir for others to read.

  • Carol Tilley

    Most definitely deserving of the praise it's receiving.

  • Mrs.

    Powerful. Honest. Beautiful. The author’s note had me in tears. I believe this book is powerful beyond measure. It gives a voice to children of addicts, and it’s a voice of hope and courage.

  • MissFabularian

    ....gutted me.

  • Lola

    I only realized I have read this author before (five times, actually) when I read the author’s note and realized that he’s the creator of Lunch Lady.

    No wonder I didn’t figure it out. This is not humorous, or light, or action-packed like Lunch Lady is.

    Because this is a memoir—the author’s. And a very honest one at that. It’s never easy to share your truth with the world, because what if your words are not well-received, what if you’re judged, what if you didn’t carry your message across?

    But it’s

    I only realized I have read this author before (five times, actually) when I read the author’s note and realized that he’s the creator of Lunch Lady.

    No wonder I didn’t figure it out. This is not humorous, or light, or action-packed like Lunch Lady is.

    Because this is a memoir—the author’s. And a very honest one at that. It’s never easy to share your truth with the world, because what if your words are not well-received, what if you’re judged, what if you didn’t carry your message across?

    But it’s still important you try. I’m glad this author tried, despite his initial reluctance. He mentioned becoming motivated to create this graphic novel after giving a TED talk and receiving an overwhelmingly positive response, and I’m so glad he did.

    In this book, we follow Jarrett from childhood to adolescence to graduating high school. We see him interact with his mother, who was a heroin addict, his grandparents, who raised him after witnesses their daughter’s decline into darkness, and later on his father.

    It’s not an easy story to read, definitely darker than most YA graphic memoirs that get published. Actually, graphic memoirs to begin with aren’t very popular, but those that I have read were nothing like this.

    I’m not trying to say it’s a depressive story. On the contrary, it is hopeful, family-focused, and will motivate you to do everything possible to accomplish your own dreams. But the child neglect, of course, affected me.

    The author wrote this book in hope that readers will be able to understand and perhaps connect. I say he has achieved his goal. I can’t wait for this book to come out and see it skyrocket to NYT bestselling status.

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  • Rachel Reads Ravenously

    I honestly cannot remember what made me request this graphic novel from the library, it is so not my normal reading zone. But I am very glad I did. Jarrett Krosoczka, author of the kids graphic novel series Lunch Lady, tells the story of his childhood and teenage years. His mother's addiction and father's absence had an impact on his life, but not as profound as the grandparents who stepped up and raised him.

    This was unputdownable, I finished it within a few h

    I honestly cannot remember what made me request this graphic novel from the library, it is so not my normal reading zone. But I am very glad I did. Jarrett Krosoczka, author of the kids graphic novel series Lunch Lady, tells the story of his childhood and teenage years. His mother's addiction and father's absence had an impact on his life, but not as profound as the grandparents who stepped up and raised him.

    This was unputdownable, I finished it within a few hours. My favorite parts of the book were his grandmother who seemed to be a complex and lively woman who didn't always make the best choices, but she loved fiercely. I think this is a great book for teens to read to understand kids with this background. It's also a story too many kids are living themselves.

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