The Woman's Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote

The Woman's Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote

The nail-biting climax of one of the greatest political victories in American history: the down and dirty campaign to get the last state to ratify the 19th amendment, granting women the right to vote."Anyone interested in the history of our country's ongoing fight to put its founding values into practice--as well as those seeking the roots of current political fault lines-...

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Title:The Woman's Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote
Author:Elaine F. Weiss
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The Woman's Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote Reviews

  • Jillian Doherty

    Highlighting the power of women's fight for equality in a single summer, this brilliant and timely narrative nonfiction is a wake up call.

    By looking back on our struggles, can we truly understand hidden and undervalued lessons gained that we take for granted today.

    Weiss' voice is not only readable but empowering as Daniel James Brown (Boys in the Boat) but as fascinating for both men and women to read. Plus we could take a page from their powerful methods of activism and continue to fight agai

    Highlighting the power of women's fight for equality in a single summer, this brilliant and timely narrative nonfiction is a wake up call.

    By looking back on our struggles, can we truly understand hidden and undervalued lessons gained that we take for granted today.

    Weiss' voice is not only readable but empowering as Daniel James Brown (Boys in the Boat) but as fascinating for both men and women to read. Plus we could take a page from their powerful methods of activism and continue to fight against oppression today.

    I hope when it's published in March, Women's history month, its only the beginning of it's long and needed life.

  • Mary

    Elaine Weiss does a commendable job of writing about the last big battle before the ratification granting women the right to vote. The book reads like fiction and definitely helped me better understand both the Suffragettes and the "Antis'. There were so many different issues and players in this fight for ratification. It was amazing that it was passed and a true testament to the will and drive the Suffragettes had.

    Carl Sagan once said, "You have to know the past to understand the present" and M

    Elaine Weiss does a commendable job of writing about the last big battle before the ratification granting women the right to vote. The book reads like fiction and definitely helped me better understand both the Suffragettes and the "Antis'. There were so many different issues and players in this fight for ratification. It was amazing that it was passed and a true testament to the will and drive the Suffragettes had.

    Carl Sagan once said, "You have to know the past to understand the present" and Ms. Weiss' book helps us both know the past while giving us a way to understand our present - the question is will we take about the challenge entrusted to us?

    Read this if you like history. Read this if you are even a little bit political. But don't read if you only like fast-paced books that don't need a lot of consideration.

  • Lauren Stoolfire

    by Elaine F. Weiss follows a handful of brave women who fought for the right to vote with cameos from Woodrow Wilson, Warren G. Harding, Frederick Douglass, and Eleanor Roosevelt. The narrative presented primarily takes place in Nashville, August 1920. By this time only one more state is required for ratification of the nineteenth amendment and everything falls on Tennessee. The op

    by Elaine F. Weiss follows a handful of brave women who fought for the right to vote with cameos from Woodrow Wilson, Warren G. Harding, Frederick Douglass, and Eleanor Roosevelt. The narrative presented primarily takes place in Nashville, August 1920. By this time only one more state is required for ratification of the nineteenth amendment and everything falls on Tennessee. The opposition features politicians with careers at stake, liquor companies, railroad magnates, and racists who don't want black women voting. There are also the 'Antis' - women who fear that their own enfranchisement will cause the moral collapse of the United States. All of these elements come together to face off in Nashville replete with dirty tricks, betrayals and bribes, bigotry, Jack Daniel's, and the Bible.

    This history book by Elaine F. Weiss is easily one of the most readable and comprehensive books on the women's suffrage movement focusing on ratification and Tennessee that I have ever had the opportunity to read. I've been reading quite a bit lately about that time period and women's suffrage, but this is hands down the most informative when it comes to such a key moment in history. The author also does a fantastic job of integrating history of the movement into the primary as well - I, for one, particularly enjoyed seeing Victoria Woodhull's name get brought up since she's so often left out (I'm glad that people are really beginning to learn more about her life). The author also does a great job of starkly laying out all of the movement's detractors, so matter-of-factly detailing their means, methods, and motivations for being on the other side of history. Finally, I'd also like to mention that Weiss also does a brilliant job of making her history book feel incredibly timely. Of course, the main events in the book take place 98 years ago, but she still does a fantastic job of making their battle feel like fresh and current.

    Overall, I highly recommend this new non-fiction book from Elaine F. Weiss all about everything finally coming together after a decades long struggle for women to cast their ballots. Every page of this inspiring 400+ page tome is inspiring and well worth your time. I will definitely be keeping my eyes out for future projects from this author.

  • Linh

    This is truly excellent. I will never again believe that women were "given" the vote. They fought tooth and nail to get the enfranchisement. This is something that every woman should read.

  • Laura Hoffman Brauman

    If we taught history like this book writes it, every student would want to study for a PhD. The Woman's Hour was riveting from the first page to the last. In 1920, the vote to ratify the 19th amendment and give women the right to vote was up in the Tennessee legislature. 35 states had voted to ratify, none in the south. Suffragettes and anti-suffragettes all collided in Nashville in a bitter struggle to determine whether or not women would gain the federal right to vote. There was literally a na

    If we taught history like this book writes it, every student would want to study for a PhD. The Woman's Hour was riveting from the first page to the last. In 1920, the vote to ratify the 19th amendment and give women the right to vote was up in the Tennessee legislature. 35 states had voted to ratify, none in the south. Suffragettes and anti-suffragettes all collided in Nashville in a bitter struggle to determine whether or not women would gain the federal right to vote. There was literally a nail biter finish equal to any thriller I have read or watched. I learned so much about this -- including the shameful pieces of how race impacted the anti-suffragette movement and how many suffragettes were willing to sacrifice equal rights for African-Americans if it got women the right to vote. This was incredible -- it would make an amazing film and at minimum, excerpts of this should be used in high school history classes. One of the most moving photos in the book was of Susan B Anthony's gravestone in November of 2016. Over 10,000 women took their "I voted" stickers and left them on the gravestone -- what an incredible tribute to the lifelong crusade of these women.

  • Jeimy

    A fantastic work of narrative nonfiction that offers a behind-the-scenes look at what it took for Tennessee to ratify suffrage and how this led to women having the right to vote across the U.S.

    Sadly, many of the issues being discussed 100 years ago are still relevant today. Thankfully, women are reclaiming their political power. Let us hope that the unity created by the International Women Marches leads to changes at such a grand scale as that described in this book.

  • Karen

    I received this from netgalley.com in exchange for a review.

    Wow, every time we walk into a polling booth we should be remembering these ladies and the battle they fought for our right to vote!

    4☆

  • Krisette Spangler

    I learned so much as I read through this great novel. There was just so much I didn't know about the suffrage movement. My only complaint was the organization of the novel often left me confused about the people I was reading about.

  • Karen

    This book was excellent. It reminded me how much politics has changed, and how much it has remained the same. I kept exclaiming, "I have lived this!" Especially as we approach the century anniversary of sufferage, this book seems timely.

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