You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor's Stories of Life, Death, and in Between

You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor's Stories of Life, Death, and in Between

For readers of Atul Gawande and Jerome Groopman, a book of beautifully crafted stories about what life is like for patients kept alive by modern medical technology.Modern medicine is a world that glimmers with new technology and cutting-edge research. To the public eye, medical stories often begin with sirens and flashing lights and culminate in survival or death. But thes...

DownloadRead Online
Title:You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor's Stories of Life, Death, and in Between
Author:Daniela J. Lamas
Rating:

You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor's Stories of Life, Death, and in Between Reviews

  • Kind  Konfetti

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas writes beautifully, full of compassion as she shares the highs and lows of patients experiencing the cutting edge of our latest advancements in medicine. The focus of the book was entirely on the people we work toward

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas writes beautifully, full of compassion as she shares the highs and lows of patients experiencing the cutting edge of our latest advancements in medicine. The focus of the book was entirely on the people we work towards saving/ prolonging life rather than about Dr Lamas' career but I am sure she has had a journey many would love to read about. I appreciate that the realities of the darker side of medicine are briefly touched upon when Dr Lamas explains patients give up one set of crappy reality for another set of unexpected crappiness in the hope of disease improvement, but overall the message of the book is about hope. Thank you to Dr Lamas for her work, to the people who shared their stories, and to the publishers and netgalley for my e-arc. I don't usually mention covers in my reviews but I love the simplistic design of my e-arc cover with the stethoscope and can't wait to pick up a physical copy once these hit the bookshelves. Definitely recommend to all involved/interested in healthcare provision and those who love stories of everyday people overcoming challenges.

  • Susannah

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician’s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading.

  • Julie

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their lives have been impacted by illness, and how their recovery is going. For many doctors they often see their patients for a limited amount of time, but the patient may have ongoing problems related to their treatment

    Daniela Lamas has written a book about many of the patients she has looked after in her years in medicine. As well as talking about the care they receive in the critical units of the hospital, she goes and talks to some of the patients after they have been discharged to see how their lives have been impacted by illness, and how their recovery is going. For many doctors they often see their patients for a limited amount of time, but the patient may have ongoing problems related to their treatments.

    I am a bit of a fan of these types of books, but I felt a little like I missed the point of this one as I came away a little bit like I hadn't learnt a lot or completely understood the point of her book.

  • Anna

    I learned a lot here (particularly about the "in between") about the medical world that I had no knowledge of before. The stories are told with thoughtfulness and tenderness and really bring the people to life.

  • Jackie

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of the myriad advances in medical care. People who would have died a decade ago are left alive but only partially so.

    The reason the book is not a 5, in my opinion, is that there is much more detail than what interest

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of the myriad advances in medical care. People who would have died a decade ago are left alive but only partially so.

    The reason the book is not a 5, in my opinion, is that there is much more detail than what interest me.

  • Neil

    I received a free copy via Netgalley in exchange for a honest review.

    An Emotional and sometimes upsetting insight into critical care for patients.

    A riveting read throughout.

  • Sara

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you with science and facts, Lamas takes us on a journey through the emotional and physical side effects of people suffering from long term or chronic illnesses that 5, even 10, years ago they might not have survived due to th

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you with science and facts, Lamas takes us on a journey through the emotional and physical side effects of people suffering from long term or chronic illnesses that 5, even 10, years ago they might not have survived due to the amazing advances in medicine. It's a very human approach to an often aseptic topic.

    As a student I was always taught the importance of evidence based practice. We can only continue to improve and grow as a profession within medicine if we have the means and foresight to continually expand our knowledge and abilities. This book is a perfect example of that. Lamas speaks with passion and empathy as she relays the stories of several patients who've directly benefitted from such treatment, and what it knw means to survive past an expected 'expiration date'.

    Patients include a kidney transplant recipient who found his donor through Facebook, a woman with cystic fibrosis nearing her 40th birthday when she wasn't expected to live past 30, and a number of patients suffering from chronic pulmonary or cardiac diseases who fought through time in ITU with the help of various ingenius machines or devices to reach a purgatory existence on the other side. Lamas has a history in ITU care, and as such most of the patients discussed have some form of background spent here. This was a refreshing side to understanding medical care which I haven't read before, and it was also nice to hear from a medical professional across the pond. As a stoic advocate for the NHS, the American 'care' system baffles me greatly, and this resonates throughout the book with some mentions of limited insurance payouts for rehabilitation centres and endless cycles of paperwork for pharmaceuticals. Thank goodness we don't that kind of health system.

    Getting back to the stories themselves, it's clear that Lamas has a passion for healthcare and a high regard for all the patients and colleagues she speaks of. There's some lovely little snippets of stories that show levels of dedication that go above and beyond the duty of care and endless warmth for patient care that shines through.

    An interesting read, and one I would highly recommend for people interested in the amazing advances in medicine that are greatly changing the face of modern medicine as we know it.

  • Emily

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, due to amazing medical advances," the book felt kind of voyeuristic and exploitative. What were we supposed to take way, exactly?

    Audio production also fine. A few interpretations that seemed off to me, and the volume

    This was fine. Lamas is a capable writer and the stories are both interesting and moving. When I finished it, though, I was left not quite sure what point she was trying to make. Without a connective thread beyond "these people spent time in the ICU and only survived, when they did, due to amazing medical advances," the book felt kind of voyeuristic and exploitative. What were we supposed to take way, exactly?

    Audio production also fine. A few interpretations that seemed off to me, and the volume on the author's epilogue was quite a bit louder than the previous section, but otherwise, unremarkable and inoffensive.

  • Stella Fouts

    Interesting, but that's about the best comment I can make. I was taken aback by the fact that the author crossed the line (and she admitted it) when she accepted a patient's friend request on Facebook. But I was left with a bitter taste in my mouth after reading that she visited his page more than once (stalking?), but never responded to his question to her. And then she writes an article about him - and then makes that her leading story for this book - and THEN uses his question to her for a ti

    Interesting, but that's about the best comment I can make. I was taken aback by the fact that the author crossed the line (and she admitted it) when she accepted a patient's friend request on Facebook. But I was left with a bitter taste in my mouth after reading that she visited his page more than once (stalking?), but never responded to his question to her. And then she writes an article about him - and then makes that her leading story for this book - and THEN uses his question to her for a title for her book??? Shameful.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.