You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor's Stories of Life, Death, and in Between

You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor's Stories of Life, Death, and in Between

For readers of Atul Gawande and Jerome Groopman, a book of beautifully crafted stories about what life is like for patients kept alive by modern medical technology.Modern medicine is a world that glimmers with new technology and cutting-edge research. To the public eye, medical stories often begin with sirens and flashing lights and culminate in survival or death. But thes...

DownloadRead Online
Title:You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor's Stories of Life, Death, and in Between
Author:Daniela Lamas
Rating:

You Can Stop Humming Now: A Doctor's Stories of Life, Death, and in Between Reviews

  • Kind  Konfetti

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas writes beautifully, full of compassion as she shares the highs and lows of patients experiencing the cutting edge of our latest advancements in medicine. The focus of the book was entirely on the people we work toward

    I went into this book wanting to learn more about the science and policies of my health care colleagues across the pond. My expectations quickly shifted as I realised this book was about the people we care for, their stories and the impact of medical interventions on them. Dr Lamas writes beautifully, full of compassion as she shares the highs and lows of patients experiencing the cutting edge of our latest advancements in medicine. The focus of the book was entirely on the people we work towards saving/ prolonging life rather than about Dr Lamas' career but I am sure she has had a journey many would love to read about. I appreciate that the realities of the darker side of medicine are briefly touched upon when Dr Lamas explains patients give up one set of crappy reality for another set of unexpected crappiness in the hope of disease improvement, but overall the message of the book is about hope. Thank you to Dr Lamas for her work, to the people who shared their stories, and to the publishers and netgalley for my e-arc. I don't usually mention covers in my reviews but I love the simplistic design of my e-arc cover with the stethoscope and can't wait to pick up a physical copy once these hit the bookshelves. Definitely recommend to all involved/interested in healthcare provision and those who love stories of everyday people overcoming challenges.

  • Susannah

    A compassionate look at medical care from a clinician’s perspective. Dr. Lamas is a gifted writer in addition to being a sympathetic healer. This book should be required reading for every doctor in training. Truly gorgeous reading.

  • Kirsti

    Shortly after I started this book, I felt as if I were falling into it. I got completely caught up in the author's world, even though I am not a doctor or a transplant patient. I knew that sometimes people experience delirium while in a hospital, but I didn't know that people can have PTSD related to that delirium. Even though the person with PTSD knows that the hospital was the safest place and the threats were not real, the body reacts as if the walls really were bleeding.

  • Jackie

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of the myriad advances in medical care. People who would have died a decade ago are left alive but only partially so.

    The reason the book is not a 5, in my opinion, is that there is much more detail than what interest

    It gets 4 from me because of the interesting topic and subtle presentation of such. I had never really thought about there being a group of patients who spend much of their last years suspended between life and death. The irony is there are increasingly more of these people because of the myriad advances in medical care. People who would have died a decade ago are left alive but only partially so.

    The reason the book is not a 5, in my opinion, is that there is much more detail than what interest me.

  • Neil

    I received a free copy via Netgalley in exchange for a honest review.

    An Emotional and sometimes upsetting insight into critical care for patients.

    A riveting read throughout.

  • Petra Eggs

    Why, "You can stop humming now"? Humming increases the pressure in the chest. The author was about to pull out an intravenous line and before she would be able to cover the little hole with a dressing an air bubble might enter the patient's body, travel to his heart and kill him! So she told him to hum to increase the pressure. After the dressing was applied, he could stop humming!

    I quite enjoyed this book, it had a more unusual angle than most, dealing as it with people dependent on machines to

    Why, "You can stop humming now"? Humming increases the pressure in the chest. The author was about to pull out an intravenous line and before she would be able to cover the little hole with a dressing an air bubble might enter the patient's body, travel to his heart and kill him! So she told him to hum to increase the pressure. After the dressing was applied, he could stop humming!

    I quite enjoyed this book, it had a more unusual angle than most, dealing as it with people dependent on machines to keep them alive and delving into how they live their lives whilst on the machines and afterwards when they have either recovered (few), had transplants or are just suffering the consquences of, say, too little oxygen for the brain for too long.

    The author might be a great doctor, I don't know, but as far as a writer is concerned, it's don't give up the day job. She's good, but in a market saturated with doctors' stories and memoirs, she doesn't stand out, certainly not in the same way that

    does with his luminous, insightful stories.

    One thing the author does make a point of that so many others forget: it's just as hard a row to hoe for the families as for the person suffering from a much damaged quality of life. They become the permanent, usually unpaid nurses and carers. Sometimes their own lives are permanently changed, and much for the worse. The things we do for love.

  • Sara

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you with science and facts, Lamas takes us on a journey through the emotional and physical side effects of people suffering from long term or chronic illnesses that 5, even 10, years ago they might not have survived due to th

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

    You Can Stop Humming Now is a non fiction memoir of sorts that takes us through the wonders of modern medicine by examining various patients past and patient under the care of Daniela Lamas. Rather than baffle you with science and facts, Lamas takes us on a journey through the emotional and physical side effects of people suffering from long term or chronic illnesses that 5, even 10, years ago they might not have survived due to the amazing advances in medicine. It's a very human approach to an often aseptic topic.

    As a student I was always taught the importance of evidence based practice. We can only continue to improve and grow as a profession within medicine if we have the means and foresight to continually expand our knowledge and abilities. This book is a perfect example of that. Lamas speaks with passion and empathy as she relays the stories of several patients who've directly benefitted from such treatment, and what it knw means to survive past an expected 'expiration date'.

    Patients include a kidney transplant recipient who found his donor through Facebook, a woman with cystic fibrosis nearing her 40th birthday when she wasn't expected to live past 30, and a number of patients suffering from chronic pulmonary or cardiac diseases who fought through time in ITU with the help of various ingenius machines or devices to reach a purgatory existence on the other side. Lamas has a history in ITU care, and as such most of the patients discussed have some form of background spent here. This was a refreshing side to understanding medical care which I haven't read before, and it was also nice to hear from a medical professional across the pond. As a stoic advocate for the NHS, the American 'care' system baffles me greatly, and this resonates throughout the book with some mentions of limited insurance payouts for rehabilitation centres and endless cycles of paperwork for pharmaceuticals. Thank goodness we don't that kind of health system.

    Getting back to the stories themselves, it's clear that Lamas has a passion for healthcare and a high regard for all the patients and colleagues she speaks of. There's some lovely little snippets of stories that show levels of dedication that go above and beyond the duty of care and endless warmth for patient care that shines through.

    An interesting read, and one I would highly recommend for people interested in the amazing advances in medicine that are greatly changing the face of modern medicine as we know it.

  • Rosanne

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a health crisis occurred. Other than reporting on what she saw, she didn't spend much time discussing the dilemma of "how much is too much" when a patient is facing a health crossroad. I would have liked to learn more f

    I thought this book by a critical care physician would be much like "Being Mortal", but I found it to be less informative. The author becomes curious as to what happens to patients she sees in the CCU after they leave and find themselves with a different life than they had before a health crisis occurred. Other than reporting on what she saw, she didn't spend much time discussing the dilemma of "how much is too much" when a patient is facing a health crossroad. I would have liked to learn more from her as to how she feels regarding balancing the life extending interventions of modern medicine with the emotional and physical costs to the patients and their families instead of just relating stories with a variety of outcomes.

  • Eleanor

    Maybe it's me. I stopped reading this book about 2 anecdotes in. It's like romance/suspense books--so few authors do it as well as Mary Stewart, that they're just not worth reading. Having inhaled (over and over) Oliver Sacks' and Atul Gawande's books, this one is just.not.there. IMO, she could be, someday. There's talent here--it's a gift to not only be able to retain the humanity of medicine, but also to be able to convey it to laypeople in ways that demonstrate the poignancy without the sheer

    Maybe it's me. I stopped reading this book about 2 anecdotes in. It's like romance/suspense books--so few authors do it as well as Mary Stewart, that they're just not worth reading. Having inhaled (over and over) Oliver Sacks' and Atul Gawande's books, this one is just.not.there. IMO, she could be, someday. There's talent here--it's a gift to not only be able to retain the humanity of medicine, but also to be able to convey it to laypeople in ways that demonstrate the poignancy without the sheer terror that comes with so much illness. IMO, she needed a more ruthless editor. The stories I read were repetitive in some of their content; they need tightening. But there is also this: I'm too old and jaded in healthcare to bring the appropriate level of awe to these stories. I found myself critiquing the actual plans of care... ye gods. Spare me that. So, give it a go. You may love it. I may try again another time. She should keep writing, but be ruthless in her editing.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.