Mad Hatters and March Hares

Mad Hatters and March Hares

From master anthologist Ellen Datlow comes an all-original of weird tales inspired by the strangeness of Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There.Between the hallucinogenic, weird, imaginative wordplay and the brilliant mathematical puzzles and social satire, Alice has been read, enjoyed, and savored by every...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Mad Hatters and March Hares
Author:Ellen Datlow
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Mad Hatters and March Hares Reviews

  • Sarah Booth

    If you're a fan of Alice and her adventures in Wonderland this is other writers take on the characters, alternate rifts and parallel universes. Writer fan fiction. Some a bit gruesome and some quite fun and some decent poetry thrown in as well.

  • All Things Urban Fantasy

    Review courtesy of

    .

    MAD HATTERS AND MARCH HARES is a short story anthology inspired by Alice in Wonderland. Edited by Ellen Datlow, the anthology twists Alice in Wonderland into stories about a commercialized Wonderland, a grieving mother, a cat turned human, and a fantastic dinner between Alice Hargreaves and Peter Llewellyn Davies.

    There were only one or two stories that I didn’t love. Anything that was too horror or featured a sexy Alice, I ended up skimming. Some of my

    Review courtesy of

    .

    MAD HATTERS AND MARCH HARES is a short story anthology inspired by Alice in Wonderland. Edited by Ellen Datlow, the anthology twists Alice in Wonderland into stories about a commercialized Wonderland, a grieving mother, a cat turned human, and a fantastic dinner between Alice Hargreaves and Peter Llewellyn Davies.

    There were only one or two stories that I didn’t love. Anything that was too horror or featured a sexy Alice, I ended up skimming. Some of my favourite short stories were, unsurprisingly, from well-known heavy hitters: Genevieve Valentine, Seanan McGuire and Catherynne M. Valente. Most of the stories stayed within the fantasy or magic realism genre, I would have liked to have seen a futuristic or overtly sci-fi twist in the anthology as well.

    Even if you only know the Disney version of Alice in Wonderland, most of the short stories use the more well-known aspects of novel. If you’re an aficionado, you’ll pick up the smaller details in the stories. MAD HATTERS AND MARCH HARES is an excellently curated anthology that is a must read over tea and oysters.

  • Courtney

    is an Alice in Wonderland themed anthology. These short stories and poem are all edited by

    and were created by sixteen different authors. While most do differ in genre, there are more horror and psychological thrillers in here than any other kind. As someone who loves darker stories I really enjoyed that fact - those were my favorites!

    I enjoyed some stories more than others, but truthfully I did enjoy them all on some level. I couldn't read this collecti

    is an Alice in Wonderland themed anthology. These short stories and poem are all edited by

    and were created by sixteen different authors. While most do differ in genre, there are more horror and psychological thrillers in here than any other kind. As someone who loves darker stories I really enjoyed that fact - those were my favorites!

    I enjoyed some stories more than others, but truthfully I did enjoy them all on some level. I couldn't read this collection straight through; instead I only read a couple of stories each day. That's only because I ended up with so many different versions of Alice in Wonderland and Co. that it would get confusing, haha. So I recommend taking your time readimg this anthology.

    I would have liked to see less stories featuring Alice and more staring another character from Wonderland that doesn't often get much attention. A few authors did focus on lesser used characters, but there are (unfortunately) many Alice's through out this book. That didn't make me like those stories any less, of course, but it did feel a bit redundant having to read "Alice" on the majority of these pages.

    by Delia Sherman - This is a neat little story about an unidentified "dreamer" who takes the form of Alice, journeying through the looking glass, accompanied by a red knight with an opposing personality. All their adventures bring the not-Alice (nor Josh) to a startling, yet satisfying conclusion and with the Knight's support, they create an (identification) invention of their own. This is about reinventing and being true to yourself.

    by C.S.E. Cooney - Someone or something has been sneaking into their village and snatching the Cheshire animals' teeth while they lay smiling in their sleep. Whether it be a monkey, bear, cat or any other species of Cheshire - they are all half-whole half-hole creatures, made to fade in and out on a smile. Their teeth are what keeps them coming back, and with out them they can't stop themselves from completely fading away. One by one the Cheshire's are blinking out. Can sisters Lily-White and Ruby-Red discover who (or what) is snatching the teeth and save the Cheshires from extinction?

    by Jane Yolan - Tweedle-dee's and Tweedle-dum's raucous quarreling provided enough of a distraction for the intelligent ape-man to escape Mr. Barnum's train of traveling performers. Hoping to interact with the animals of a near by zoo, he gets derailed by a mischievous cat and rerouted to Wonderland. Once there, he's led out onto the Red Queen's stage to entertain her audience in a blood sport. He finds out that he's to be the Queen's champion in a fight to the death against a Jabberwocky. Being an entertainer at heart, he knows the show must go on... And perhaps if he can keep the crowd happy this won't be his final curtain fall.

    by Priya Sharma - When Alice's hatter father goes mad he starts losing business. Once sought out for his unique creations, he's now avoided for his tarnished stature. With less and less customers to buy his hats, he and his daughter fall into financial problems and land in a debtor's prison. Being raised a hatter herself, will Alice be able to figure out a way to procure the money needed to free them? The prison is more like a mad house and everyone there seems to be crazy. Can she trust the visions created in a mind overcome by madness? Perhaps money is not the answer to their problems.

    by Richard Bowes - The 50th anniversary/resurrection of the 1965 show, Some Kind of Wonderland, is approaching. The remaining members of that cast all reunite for the big milestone to speak of the movie, reminisce and participate in interviews. Written from Justin's POV (who played the Cheshire cat), We get to see what the actors are up to now, how each of them contributed to the film, their struggles with drug abuse and how they all managed to work with their very troubled director, Scot Holman. All sorts of juicy and dark behind the scenes secrets are let out.

    by Stephen Graham Jones - A grad student who's been asked to house-sit his aunt's home for the week, invites his friends Tabby, Lewis and their friend Alice over. Alice, whose real name is Marly, named herself so based on a character she learned about while majoring in folklore. What if Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland wasn't his original idea, but a story constructed from a folktale? Four drunk grad students stood in front of a mirror with a camera at the ready, all trying to debunk the legend of Alice and have a good time. But what they were met with was a horrifyingly gruesome experience. - The legend of Bloody Mary meets Wonderland (sort of).

    by Jeffrey Ford - When Humpty Dumpy accused the king's wife, the queen of hearts, of doing something terrible, the king broke him into pieces. Instead of getting rid of the egg's shell, the king ordered his men to put Humpty Dumpty back together again, but they passed the job off to the queen's sister, Cinder. When she completed her task, the egg told her the truth, promised her a reward and disappeared. One of the men created a lie in place for the truth Cinder was given, but losing the egg would surely lose Cinder her head. What will happen when someone is falsely accused of a crime and the Queen's sister is locked in a cell?

    by Angela Slatter - Being a perfectly good courtier and procurer, the white rabbit often went to our world to bring back children for the queen to use for her own wicked amusement. However, the last child he brought back changed everything. If it wasn't for that Alice, the white rabbit's secret from the queen would have never been discovered and he wouldn't still be in hiding. One day, while in our world, he meets a girl named Pleasance at bar, but she's not as pleasant as her name would make you think. She's manically vengeful and drags him all the way back to Wonderland by his little unlucky rabbit toe.

    by Matthew Kressel - The world of Wonderland has been turned into one of the most sought out tourist attractions. Sightseer's from around the globe can all jump down the rabbit hole and experience the adventures Alice was famous for going on. Despite all the exciting fun to be had, there are also many dangers to beware; it is a mad place after all. Every once in a while someone ends up missing, but where can those who have been swallowed up and claimed by this chaotic world be found? If they even can be, that is.

    by Seanan McGuire - "Doors swing both ways"- those are the rules. So when Alice uses the door to enter Wonderland, the door pushes the Cheshire into our world, to make things universally fair, of course. Following those same rules of logic, a talking cat can not exist in our world, and so the cat becomes a little human girl. We get to see how the Cheshire cat adapts and grows in a riddless world full of strange rules, the way we see Alice do the same in the original tales, but in a strange world with out any rules.

    by Andy Duncan - Have you ever been haunted by the choices you've made? John Tenniel, the illustrator of the Alice books, certainly knows what that's like. After writing a letter to Lewis Carroll explaining why he decided not to illustrate a certain chapter, he suddenly starts seeing the very creatures he declined to draw everywhere he goes: wasps! Are these visions of insects the results of deep regret, or something more?

    by Kaaron Warren - Whenever someone dies, Alice, along with the rest of the workers from her uncle's company, go to that person's property to clean it up for their loved ones. This time, when Alice enters the house of a recently dead man, she is met with the most curious house pet: The Mock Turtle. She would never steal anything too valuable from the dead - only their food to prevent it from wasting. As they fill their bellies, Alice and the turtle discuss their many life tragedies, dreaming up a sort of Wonderland they wish they could live in.

    by Ysabeau S. Wilce - After being mugged by a bunch of stealie boys, the little tamale girl sits in the sand pondering what to do next; not wanting to face the consequences of going home empty handed. When she sees a large rabbit seemingly abandon his heavy trunk in the middle of a crossroads, she goes to investigate. The trunk isn't just a trunk after all, its a portal! When she falls inside she finds herself tossed into the middle of a play designed and ran by the residents of Wonderland. Who will she be cast as?

    by Genevieve Valentine - Every female who enters Wonderland starts off as an "Alice", but how they react to their adventures will determine who they'll end up as: a free hero or a permanent worker. Alice's are loud and bold, with an appetite for adventure and always end up escaping the queen and Wonderland and saving the day. Mary-Ann's, on the other hand, are very cautious creatures and stay weary of Wonderland's tricks and treats; they always take the safer route, and eventually become quiet and unnoticed and never leave the world. From the duchess's eyes, we get to see how girls weave between both possibilities on their journey to find where they belong.

    by Catherynne M. Valente - Written in alternating chapters, this author gives us two different stories to enjoy. One follows a girl named Olive as she uses a looking glass to explore Wonderland and see's how its changed since Alice's time there. The other is of a much older Alice and a younger (but much older than in his stories) Peter Pan. They bond as they reflect on their pasts and talk about their childhoods and in what ways trying to live up to the worlds image of their younger selves effected them. - I love Alice in Wonderland and Peter Pan so this mash up is definitely one of my favorites!

    by Katherine Vaz - Its been almost a decade since she lost her six year old daughter, Alicia. Never really being able to move on, she numbly goes through the motions of life; managing her wonderland themed restaurant and wishing for her little girl back. Until one day, a lady walks in the shop with her child who looks to be about the same age Alicia would have been and reminds this poor, grief stricken mother an awful lot of the daughter she once had...

    by Jane Yolen - This is an interesting, thought provoking little poem.

  • Heather

    While I really enjoyed some of the stories a lot (Jane Yolen, Catherynne M. Valente, Katherine Vaz), the topic of Wonderland lends itself to weirdness, which - while not a bad thing, per se - can become a bit much as you read 17 stories and poems all written by different authors. I feel that (for me personally) it might have been better spread out, reading one or two entries between other books, or some such thing. Fans of Alice and the Cheshire Cat and all the rest should definitely check this

    While I really enjoyed some of the stories a lot (Jane Yolen, Catherynne M. Valente, Katherine Vaz), the topic of Wonderland lends itself to weirdness, which - while not a bad thing, per se - can become a bit much as you read 17 stories and poems all written by different authors. I feel that (for me personally) it might have been better spread out, reading one or two entries between other books, or some such thing. Fans of Alice and the Cheshire Cat and all the rest should definitely check this one out, though!

  • Melliane

    This anthology gathers poems and short stories related to the theme of Alice in Wonderland. I find the idea really great and I was really curious to get started! When I read anthologies, I usually offer a really short review by story but given the mixture of writings with this large number of authors, I prefer to give you a little recap on my feelings.

    This novel offers us different stories, different times, some very far from the original and others a little

    This anthology gathers poems and short stories related to the theme of Alice in Wonderland. I find the idea really great and I was really curious to get started! When I read anthologies, I usually offer a really short review by story but given the mixture of writings with this large number of authors, I prefer to give you a little recap on my feelings.

    This novel offers us different stories, different times, some very far from the original and others a little closer, some putting Alice as the main character and others some secondary characters in the story. I found it very interesting to see what each author would propose but it is true that if I expected a lot, especially given the theme, I was a little disappointed by some of the novellas. I was also sometimes a little confused and I was not sure that it was due to the universe. One thing is for sure, the ideas are all very original and different from what we would expect and I’m glad I was able to put a foot in this interesting and different world.

  • Lori

    We chose this book for our spring semester faculty book club, reading only a story or two per week. We had a fun time discussing the book. One professor was an "expert" on the Alice trilogy. Another was a great discussion leader who brought out probing questions to think about. Most of us agreed we enjoyed some stories more than others. Some stories follow the Alice books or draw more from them than others. We tended to like those stories more. We all felt the strongest stories were those at the

    We chose this book for our spring semester faculty book club, reading only a story or two per week. We had a fun time discussing the book. One professor was an "expert" on the Alice trilogy. Another was a great discussion leader who brought out probing questions to think about. Most of us agreed we enjoyed some stories more than others. Some stories follow the Alice books or draw more from them than others. We tended to like those stories more. We all felt the strongest stories were those at the beginning and end of the book and the mediocre ones were mostly in the middle. Poems served as "book ends." I especially enjoyed the poem shaped like a teapot. One of the more memorable stories depicts an elderly Alice and older Peter Pan in a discussion. It was a fun book for our book club.

  • Gray

    In her introduction, Datlow writes of her love of ‘the Alice books’, especially the many ‘illustrated versions’. A few years ago, she was asked by someone at a convention if there was an ‘anthology idea’ she had always wanted to do. This question led to the creation of this new collection of Alice-inspired short stories:

    .

    Whether you have read the original books or watched one of the numerous film adaptations, you will be very familiar with Alice and the weird and won

    In her introduction, Datlow writes of her love of ‘the Alice books’, especially the many ‘illustrated versions’. A few years ago, she was asked by someone at a convention if there was an ‘anthology idea’ she had always wanted to do. This question led to the creation of this new collection of Alice-inspired short stories:

    .

    Whether you have read the original books or watched one of the numerous film adaptations, you will be very familiar with Alice and the weird and wonderful characters she meets on her journey down the rabbit hole and into Wonderland. How many can you name off the top of your head? Go on, try it!

    I have read the books and seen some of the film versions. I am a big fan of Walt Disney’s 1951 animated

    . I also enjoyed author Jeff Noon’s 1996 novel

    , in which he attempts to emulate the style of Lewis Carrol’s original books while setting it in a steampunk

    universe. He writes Alice as an 8-year-old girl, so it may feel like a children’s book, but the witty wordplay is worth the entry alone.

    As with most short story collections, I enjoyed some tales more than others in

    . I have included brief spoiler-free summaries of the stories that impressed me the most.

    by Jeffrey Ford - ‘All the King’s horses and all the King’s men couldn’t put Humpty together again.’ I loved this darkly-funny tale of a lascivious Humpty Dumpty who knows too much than may be healthy for him. A surprising transformation halfway through the story leads to an imaginative pay off. This has led me to seek out Jeffrey Ford’s 2016 collection of short stories, ‘A Natural History of Hell’.

    by Jane Yolen - An orangutan from Barnum’s circus narrates the story of his encounter with the mighty Jabberwocky. Tweedledee and Tweedledum also feature. I enjoyed the orangutan’s narration with his penchant for logic.

    by Matthew Kressel

    In this rather seedy tale, Wonderland is a theme park filled with strangeness and danger. One of the guides narrates this story of long working hours and foolhardy guests who are prepared to risk everything for a new experience.

    by Seanan McGuire - The Cheshire Cat comes through a doorway into the real world and is transformed into a young girl. This beautiful and touching tale tells the story of her life from finding a home to getting married and having children of her own. The author has fun contrasting the riddles and chaos of Wonderland with the order and rules of Earth. This was my favourite story in the collection.

    by Richard Bowes - A reminiscence by the actor who played the Cheshire Cat in a 1960s New York-set film adaptation of Alice in Wonderland. The film is about to have a revival for its 50th anniversary. I enjoyed the confessional style of the narration as we gradually learn more about the different characters who starred in the film. Also the brief descriptions of some of the film’s scenes and locations help create an intriguing picture of this fictional movie.

    by Catherynne M. Valente

    Intertwines two stories: one about a girl called Olive holidaying in Wales who discovers an old looking glass; the other features the “real” Alice grown old and meeting up with the Peter who inspired the story ‘Peter Pan’. This was another of my favourites. The author explores themes of childhood, imagination, and disappointment. The two narratives complement each other, and I enjoyed searching for similarities between them. The Alice and Peter story is tinged with sadness yet also offers hope and ends with a mystery.

    If you have an interest in the original books and would like to see where modern authors might take you in the weird world of Wonderland, give this anthology a try. It should be noted that some of these stories are dark and contain adult content and themes. If you are fans of any of these authors I think you will enjoy their interpretations of Carrol’s bizarre universe.

    (Thanks to Tor Publishing & NetGalley for the digital ARC. All opinions are my own.)

  • TL

    Before going into this, I only knew two of the author's names: Seanan McGuire and Catherynne M. Valente but was excited to maybe get some new favorite stories and/or authors. I still haven't read

    yet (one I keep meaning to get to but never in the mood for it.. .mood reader mentality sucks sometimes) *sheepish* Whoops? Haha

    There were a few standout stories (see two authors I mentioned above, plus a few others) but most of the stories were just "okay" or "meh" The latter were

    Before going into this, I only knew two of the author's names: Seanan McGuire and Catherynne M. Valente but was excited to maybe get some new favorite stories and/or authors. I still haven't read

    yet (one I keep meaning to get to but never in the mood for it.. .mood reader mentality sucks sometimes) *sheepish* Whoops? Haha

    There were a few standout stories (see two authors I mentioned above, plus a few others) but most of the stories were just "okay" or "meh" The latter were interesting for me enough to finish em but weren't really memorable.

    There was one that left a bad taste in my mouth, that particular part came at the end otherwise I probably wouldn't have finished it. It was creepy so the author does gets points for that but umm... yeah.

    A few stories' connections to the original

    seemed very thin to me too.. .sometimes it was like squinting and tilting your head and still not seeing it. Made me wonder how they managed to swing into this collection at all.

    One story I didn't finish because I was bored to tears and the last poem didn't leave an impression on me really.

    Would recommend? Dunno, maybe... I would recommend getting it from your library first though.

  • Karl

    All new stories from"The World of Lewis Carroll's Alice In Wonderland"

    All stories copyright 2017.

    Contents:

    009 - Acknowledgments

    013 - Introduction

    015 - “Gentle Alice” by Kris Dikeman

    017 - “My Own Invention” by Delia Sherman

    027 - “Lily-White & The Thief of Lesser Night” by C.S.E. Cooney

    051 - “Conjoined” by Jane Yolen

    065 - “Mercury” by Priya Sharma

    097 - “Some Kind of Wonderland” by Richard Bowes

    115 - “Alis” by Stephen Graham Jones

    147 - “All the King’s Men” by Jeffrey Ford

    163 - “Run, Rabbit” by

    All new stories from"The World of Lewis Carroll's Alice In Wonderland"

    All stories copyright 2017.

    Contents:

    009 - Acknowledgments

    013 - Introduction

    015 - “Gentle Alice” by Kris Dikeman

    017 - “My Own Invention” by Delia Sherman

    027 - “Lily-White & The Thief of Lesser Night” by C.S.E. Cooney

    051 - “Conjoined” by Jane Yolen

    065 - “Mercury” by Priya Sharma

    097 - “Some Kind of Wonderland” by Richard Bowes

    115 - “Alis” by Stephen Graham Jones

    147 - “All the King’s Men” by Jeffrey Ford

    163 - “Run, Rabbit” by Angela Slatter

    173 - “In Memory of a Summer’s Day” by Matthew Kressel

    185 - “Sentence Like a Saturday” by Seanan McGuire

    203 - “Worrity, Worrity” by Andy Duncan

    221 - “Eating the Alice Cake” by Kaaron Warren

    237 - “The Queen of Hats” by Ysabeau Wilce

    255 - “A Comfort, One Way” by Genevieve Valentine

    265 - “The Flame After the Candle” by Catherynne M. Valente

    303 - “Moon, Memory, Muchness” by Katherine Vaz

    325 - “Run, Rabbit, Run” by Jane Yolen

    327 - About the Authors

    333 - About the Editor

    Cover art by Dave McKean.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.