The Weaver's Daughter

The Weaver's Daughter

Kate's loyalties bind her to the past. Henry's loyalties compel him to strive for a better future. In a landscape torn between tradition and vision, can two souls find the strength to overcome their preconceptions?Loyalty has been at the heart of the Dearborne family for as long as Kate can remember, but a war is brewing in their small village, one that has the power to ri...

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Title:The Weaver's Daughter
Author:Sarah E. Ladd
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The Weaver's Daughter Reviews

  • Heidi Robbins (Heidi Reads...)

    I loved the feeling of being immersed in the setting as I read this book! The author wove in details of the weavers, mills, and the politics of both sides without becoming boring, rather it enhanced the plot and showed insights into the characters and the hard work they tackled. It reminded me very much of the BBC miniseries of North and South, with industry being at the forefront of everyone's lives. Kate is a strong woman who has been raised participating in the work of the weavers, but as she

    I loved the feeling of being immersed in the setting as I read this book! The author wove in details of the weavers, mills, and the politics of both sides without becoming boring, rather it enhanced the plot and showed insights into the characters and the hard work they tackled. It reminded me very much of the BBC miniseries of North and South, with industry being at the forefront of everyone's lives. Kate is a strong woman who has been raised participating in the work of the weavers, but as she is ready to take on more responsibility, she finds that her father and others only see her value in marrying to strengthen the weavers' position. She struggles with the conflict between her stubborn father and her brother Charles who has chosen to work as an accountant for the mill owners. I loved her relationship with her brother and felt bad that they were being made to choose between the life they grew up with and a brighter future. Her unlikely friendship with Henry was so sweet and as he continually shows his compassion and kindness, her eyes are opened to new possibilities for the community. The story has a steady pace as tensions mount and conflicts arise, and I was surprised by how far the weavers' protests went. I appreciated the history and learning more about this difficult time of change and transition and how it affected families and communities.

    (I received a complimentary copy of the book; all opinions in this review are my own)

  • Deanne Patterson

    This author is an absolute auto buy for me when she has a new release out. A slow to start romance, the book really hooked me. A romantic Regency suspense that I was able to guess until the end. The story wasn't a bunch of fluff romance but the story built steadily with a great story . Work at the mill is assured for everyone in this small village. That's how they support their families but as we all know life changes. Times evolve and get more modern and people start to get replaced by machines

    This author is an absolute auto buy for me when she has a new release out. A slow to start romance, the book really hooked me. A romantic Regency suspense that I was able to guess until the end. The story wasn't a bunch of fluff romance but the story built steadily with a great story . Work at the mill is assured for everyone in this small village. That's how they support their families but as we all know life changes. Times evolve and get more modern and people start to get replaced by machines in the wool mills even back in 1812 . With many men out of work and no way to support their families riots start and tragedies occur. Henry Stockton takes over the mill with his grandfather's passing. Will he bring new ideas that make people happy and will he be deemed trustworthy after his grandfather made so many enemies? Kate Dearborne has been warned to stay away from Henry, their families are in competition with their mills but they keep finding themselves at the same places at the same time. Can their hearts trust and will love find wings and fly? The author does and excellent job of engaging the reader throughout the book. I hope to see stories from some secondary characters, namely Mollie, who has a child of of wedlock and Charles, Kate's brother.

    Pub Date 10 Apr 2018

    I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson--FICTION through NetGalley. All opinions expressed are my own.

  • Kelly

    Fueled with pride, prejudice and selfishness and then combated with giving, serving and loving others unconditionally is how I would sum this book up! It describes people’s fear of technology even in the 1800’s and the wave of the future and their livelihood.

    Kate Dearborne is the weaver’s daughter. She helps out doing everything to make cloth. She has been doing this all her life. But the Stockton’s have money and have changed the way things are done and it is taking away jobs with the technolog

    Fueled with pride, prejudice and selfishness and then combated with giving, serving and loving others unconditionally is how I would sum this book up! It describes people’s fear of technology even in the 1800’s and the wave of the future and their livelihood.

    Kate Dearborne is the weaver’s daughter. She helps out doing everything to make cloth. She has been doing this all her life. But the Stockton’s have money and have changed the way things are done and it is taking away jobs with the technology. It also has small children doing simple tasks. Kate’s father does well but times are changing and men do foolish things when threatened with their livelihood. Kate’s brother Charles now works for the Stocktons. He is no longer welcome at home and his father doesn’t speak to him. Kate loves them both and sees her brother often.

    Henry is the grandson and heir to the Stockton legacy. He left for three years and fought a war. He comes back changed. He has nightmares and his perception in life has changed. His once possible future wife is just not what he is looking for or wants anymore. He doesn’t want someone who is fickle or drama laden. He wants someone caring and serving and someone like Kate. As they run into each other often, they both find that they both have the same goals and aspirations in life. He listens to her and tries to make changes based on what she suggests but is met with opposition due to the same pride,prejudice and selfishness and lack of forgiveness in his “enemies”.

    As time moves forward, things go from bad to worse and people’s lives and livelihoods are tested and hurt. Kate is made to decide where her loyalties are and she can’t decide when it could mean people could be hurt.

    What I like is that this is like Romeo and Juliet. Except with better outcomes. People have to learn to grow and continue to be kind and humble and open and serve others and then you will be happy no matter how things might turn out! It helps that Kate and Henry are so darn cute for each other. And even in Henry’s home there is turmoil.

    If you like books that make you think, forgiveness, doing the right thing, protecting what is yours, telling the truth and righting wrongs, babies, finding your match in life, pride, prejudice, and a good book then this might be for you.

  • Julie Carpenter

    4.5*

    Today was a fabulous day! I was able to dive into this book and become immersed in the lives and culture of the weavers and millworkers of Amberdale, Yorkshire, England. The tension was palpable, the strife was straining at the seams, ready to burst and be set aflame with only the slightest spark of anger.

    With progress comes change. Often, that change means loss of livelihoods for skilled, hard workers. That is exactly what is happening, and has been happening for many years in this little

    4.5*

    Today was a fabulous day! I was able to dive into this book and become immersed in the lives and culture of the weavers and millworkers of Amberdale, Yorkshire, England. The tension was palpable, the strife was straining at the seams, ready to burst and be set aflame with only the slightest spark of anger.

    With progress comes change. Often, that change means loss of livelihoods for skilled, hard workers. That is exactly what is happening, and has been happening for many years in this little mill town. When the demands for product increase and the ability to meet those demands comes at the price of new equipment, less men to work the equipment and less pay going out, it is hard to ignore progress. Yet how can you ignore the people who have become like family, whom you work with day in and day out for years on end?

    I loved the prologue. It was a great way to set up a glimpse 10 years prior to the main story, and the frustrations starting, by showing an incident that truly fueled hurt and anger. Yet, I loved having that glimpse of a certain character and then watching that character throughout the whole novel. The choices made and the growth brought on by the goodness and mercy of this character. I should probably include loving heart as well as goodness and mercy when describing said character. I could also tell you who the character is. You've probably already guessed that it is one of the main characters and you'd be correct. Kate. From the beginning setup of the story and her plight, the reader is connected emotionally to her through her hurt, her loss, her ache, her anger. Then throughout the book we watch as she evolves and grows. Becoming better than she began. While all around her is churning turmoil and anger being stirred up and fueled by greed.

    How long can anger and feuds, past hurts and wrongs last? Especially without it eating away at you? Changing you. Affecting all those around you. What would you do to protect the ones you love? How long can going to any length to protect everything around you not completely change and make you unrecognizable to loved ones. Everyone is affected, especially in a small village where everyone relies on each other. When lines are drawn, which side do you stand on? When loved ones are on either side, what then? Do you try to cover up past mistakes or do you be truthful and honest even with the repercussions that are sure to come? Will peace, redemption and love ever be attainable again?

    Just a handful of questions for you to think about and all questions that pertain to so many characters throughout this book. It was very well written. I loved the themes of redemption and change and also of not forgiving. Sarah E. Ladd is very skilled in writing flawed characters who endear themselves to the reader, leaving us wishing, hoping and even silently cheering them on in their progression. We're hoping for good to prevail and for love to conquer all. The suspense and sorrow build with a sweet resolution and peace. Yes, if you can't tell, this is a Christian Fiction novel. It wasn't preachy but woven gently throughout the story of everyday characters living their lives and interacting with other as flawed characters.

    Henry Stockton. He returns to the mill of his childhood. The mill where he left many lingering questions behind, only to return with haunting memories of war. What he returns to isn't peaceful. It's struggle and loss and sorrow. He must learn to navigate it all, keep the peace if possible and try to find peace in his own personal demons. There isn't a lot of emphasis on any particular demon he's dealing with from being at war.

    Kate is torn. She's loyal to her family. But what happens when that family is on both sides of the struggle? She must choose between family, and decide where to place her loyalty. Or does she sidestep it all, abandoning everything? Or does she choose to do what's right? With the pressure from all sides, friends, family, her heart and sorrows from the past, Kate finds herself torn as to what to do. Yet she could be the means of peace and good if only her family will listen. The weavers and millers must find a way to stop this feud before more heartache and loss ensue.

    I really enjoyed this story. Anytime Sarah E. Ladd has a new book coming out, I jump for joy. I love her writing style and her stories. If you're looking for a great read I highly recommend this one, or any of her novels. I took off half a star because there were some aspects that were built up throughout the story that didn't resolve, or really just petered out. Aspects that I felt could have been explored a little bit more and develop a little more tension to the story. Don't get me wrong. There was tension, but I would have liked to have these aspects add a little more dimension to the tension. Overall, I enjoyed my time immensely while reading about these characters. The love story is sweet and builds gently throughout the book. Henry's just swell! I am looking forward to seeing if she gives a couple other characters in this book their own story and continues on with this series.

    Content: Clean. Some remembrances from war, some fighting and gunshots. A murder. No sexual content. This is a Christian Fiction read as I mentioned above in my review but very well written and appropriate for this time period.

    I received a copy from the publisher, Thomas Nelson, via NetGalley. All thoughts and opinions in the review are my own.

    Happy Reading!!!

  • Brittany

    I have read every book that this author has written. They are always enjoyable novels that have fully immersed me in the time period. But I can say, without a doubt, that The Weaver’s Daughter is definitely my favorite book by Sarah E. Ladd that I have read so far.

    These characters! Oh My! I just loved them, especially Henry Stockton. My heart hurt for him so much for many reasons as I read through the book. He suffered a lot during the war and was plagued with guilt and trauma from that experien

    I have read every book that this author has written. They are always enjoyable novels that have fully immersed me in the time period. But I can say, without a doubt, that The Weaver’s Daughter is definitely my favorite book by Sarah E. Ladd that I have read so far.

    These characters! Oh My! I just loved them, especially Henry Stockton. My heart hurt for him so much for many reasons as I read through the book. He suffered a lot during the war and was plagued with guilt and trauma from that experience. His noble character was evident in the way he treated his sister, as well as his care and growing feelings toward Kate. Henry was a special man indeed.

    This novel had great romantic chemistry between Henry and Kate, wonderful historical detail, and a thread of danger that kept me thoroughly engrossed in the story to the very last page.

    I received a complimentary copy of this book. All opinions are my own.

    You can read this review on my blog:

  • Hannah

    Now this one is a very good story! A Regency centered around the strife between the weavers and the millers as machine-weaving mills take over the previously hand-done cloth industry—both unique and interesting in scope. It was hard to lay it aside to do other tasks, and I found both Henry and Kate to be equally engaging and principled characters. It was a joy to spend time with both of them, to see how Kate endeavors to show respect to her difficult father, and how Henry defends his livelihood

    Now this one is a very good story! A Regency centered around the strife between the weavers and the millers as machine-weaving mills take over the previously hand-done cloth industry—both unique and interesting in scope. It was hard to lay it aside to do other tasks, and I found both Henry and Kate to be equally engaging and principled characters. It was a joy to spend time with both of them, to see how Kate endeavors to show respect to her difficult father, and how Henry defends his livelihood with compassion and forgiveness. I wanted to root for both of them to succeed. I also loved how their romance was circumspect and appropriate to the time period they are in.

    The antagonists were also believable and interesting. For example, Frederica is just as trapped as Kate is, despite her fancy lifestyle and better position in society.

    I definitely am hoping that this is the start of a new series, and that we get to have a book on Frederica and a book on Kate's brother Charles!

    Cons: I didn't like how Mollie's having a child out of wedlock was portrayed in a couple places. At first it was made clear that she had asked God's forgiveness for her "indiscretion," but in later scenes it was called "error in judgment" and "perceived sin," which made it sound like she had done something all that bad. It's hinted that her sin of lying is greater than her sexual sin, while Biblically both are against God's laws.

    Language: "for heaven's sakes" used lightly

    Thanks to NetGalley for a free review copy. A favorable review was not required.

  • Staci

    A lovely tale set in England during the early 1800s. The Weaver's Daughter is about family loyalty, innovation, working conditions and more.

    Kate is the daughter of a weaver. She loves the family business and loves her father. Her father has plans to marry her to one of his employees. Her father treasures tried and true methods and is resistant to technology changes that could reduce employment opportunities.

    Henry is the grandson of the owner of a wool mill. His grandfather embraces technology an

    A lovely tale set in England during the early 1800s. The Weaver's Daughter is about family loyalty, innovation, working conditions and more.

    Kate is the daughter of a weaver. She loves the family business and loves her father. Her father has plans to marry her to one of his employees. Her father treasures tried and true methods and is resistant to technology changes that could reduce employment opportunities.

    Henry is the grandson of the owner of a wool mill. His grandfather embraces technology and seeks out new ways.

    There is clearly tension between the two families. I love that this novel is not so much a romance as it is about the two main characters figuring out their own path and forming their own opinions about how a business should be run and their lives lived.

    Kate is such a wonderful heroine. She is loyal, loving and hard working. I loved how she put the needs of others above her own.

    And the cover...stunning.

    My gratitude to the author and publisher Thomas Nelson for an ARC of this novel. I was not required to post a review and the opinions expressed are my own.

  • Beth

    A story beset by unrequited love and questions of loyalty, The Weaver's Daughter starts out gently, then culminates in tension-filled scenes and a satisfying ending.

    The setting and time-period make for a compelling read. At this point in history, mill owners and weavers were at odds. New technologies were making production more efficient, and mill owners had to change or risk losing their business. This didn't sit well with the weavers, who valued tradition and loyalty to each other. The new mac

    A story beset by unrequited love and questions of loyalty, The Weaver's Daughter starts out gently, then culminates in tension-filled scenes and a satisfying ending.

    The setting and time-period make for a compelling read. At this point in history, mill owners and weavers were at odds. New technologies were making production more efficient, and mill owners had to change or risk losing their business. This didn't sit well with the weavers, who valued tradition and loyalty to each other. The new machinery that threatened their jobs were the focal point of the strife between the two groups in this story. I found these details to be fascinating. There were North and South vibes all over this story, and I really enjoyed that aspect of it. though Henry Stockton is not quite as stern as Mr. Thornton, it had the same overtones of the disparity between classes. As usual with this time period, I'm always saddened that children were forced to work in order to help their family survive.

    Kate, our weaver' daughter, is caught in the middle. Fiercely loyal to her father, a weaver, and her brother, a worker at Stockton Mill, Kate is already divided between the two men, as her father will not speak to his son on any condition. When Henry Stockton returns from war, she begins to question her fealty to her father, not necessarily because of Henry himself, but because of her father's own questionable loyalty to her. Is her loyalty misplaced, and how will she respond when lives are at stake?

    I appreciated that the story is presented from the points of view of both Kate and Henry. They are both likable, yet realistically flawed. Their characters display compassion for others, with a sincere determination to do what is right. I found both of them to be engaging both as individuals and when they interacted with each other.

    Another character, Frederica, also has a few scenes from her point of view, which had me concerned a bit that she would turn out to be the "villain" of the story and do something cheesy or melodramatic, but that wasn't to be. A complex antagonist, I ended up feeling a lot of empathy for her. It set up things nicely for a story about her, and I hope that's the case because I do think there may be hope for her yet.

    And, ah, I can't resist saying something about the romance. It was sweet, tension-filled, and utterly swoon-worthy. Regency readers and historical romance readers will be find a worthy read in The Weaver's Daughter. I enjoyed every moment I spent reading it and look forward to reading more of Ladd's books as soon as I can.

    I received an advanced copy of this novel from the publisher. I was not required to post a positive review; the opinions expressed here are my own.

  • Kellyn Roth

    Title: The Weaver’s Daughter

    Author: Sarah E. Ladd

    Genre: Christian Historical Romance

    Era: Regency

    Setting: mid-England countryside

    Publisher: Thomas Nelson

    Source: from Netgalley (in exchange for an honest review)

    Overall Rating: 3/5 stars

    The Weaver’s Daughter by Sarah E. Ladd is a beyond amazing book with a serious moral issue. That may sound harsh, but that’s the only way to describe it. This review may offend some of y’all, but I’ve got to be truthful about my

    Title: The Weaver’s Daughter

    Author: Sarah E. Ladd

    Genre: Christian Historical Romance

    Era: Regency

    Setting: mid-England countryside

    Publisher: Thomas Nelson

    Source: from Netgalley (in exchange for an honest review)

    Overall Rating: 3/5 stars

    The Weaver’s Daughter by Sarah E. Ladd is a beyond amazing book with a serious moral issue. That may sound harsh, but that’s the only way to describe it. This review may offend some of y’all, but I’ve got to be truthful about my convictions, so here goes.

    I still have some very positive things to say about this book. It was quite well-done. Beautiful writing, interesting setting, intriguing plot, and awesome characters. This book has it all … except that one subplot.

    I’m again abandoning my regular format because this is a review that defies structure. I need to be able to talk freely.

    It was really a five-star novel. From the tension between the up-and-coming mills and the old-fashioned weavers, to the (forbidden) romance between Kate and Henry, to Kate’s relationship with her father and on and on … beautiful.

    It progressed smoothly, kept my attention, had an interesting mystery and a lot of excitement, and was reminiscent of North and South (only I actually like the characters and plot and all a lot better than North and South, shoot me).

    Also, am I the only one who is just like: YAY MILLS YAY PROGRESS LET’S BOOT THOSE SLOW WEAVERS OUT OF HERE AND ACTUALLY GET SOME WORK DONE!? Because this is how I feel … 😛

    Also, all the weavers are complete jerks. Some of the mill folks are jerks, too, but the weavers were extra special jerks.

    The whole setting was so excellent. The description really got me wrapped up in the book, combined with the excellent characters. Henry was my favorite, while Catherine’s brother and Catherine herself ran close second and third. Catherine’s dad was a jerk. #nuffsaid

    The only problem was the subplot I mentioned earlier. Now, there are some mild spoilers in this next section, but since they are so mild they probably aren’t even spoilers in some ways, I won’t bother to mark them as such. Also, I hope y’all Christian readers will choose not to read this book, so it doesn’t really matter.

    Molly, Henry’s younger sister, got pregnant out of wedlock … and Henry as well as Catherine act like this is perfectly okay (as do all the “good guy” characters).

    Molly wants to keep her pregnancy a secret and comes up with a lie to cover up (understandable, considering the fact that she is going to be thrown off the earth once Regency society finds out), but all the characters are vehement that Molly needs to tell the truth.

    And once she tells the truth the consequences of her sin (YES I SAID THE S-WORD) will go away?

    Her lie is a worse sin that her sleeping with a man while unmarried and conceiving a child by him?

    I am just so steamed about this that I’m getting angry again as I type.

    Yes, forgiveness is very important … but only if the sinner is repentant. Because that’s what Molly is. A sinner. And I know we’re all sinners … but just ’cause we’re all sinners doesn’t mean that sin is okay.

    It’s never okay.

    If Molly’s lie wasn’t “a mistake” or “a temporary lapse of judgment,” neither was her fornication. (The pregnancy isn’t really the problem morally, just to clarify; let it never be said that a pregnancy is anything but a gift. Though it might seem like a consequence.)

    This entire book treats anyone who judges Molly for her fornication like scum. But … that’s wrong. Judging people is wrong, and no sin is any worse than the other (as far as getting one into Hell and making you need Jesus, that is), but … that doesn’t make sin okay.

    Also, even though we don’t have a right to judge anyone, of course, Molly will get judged. All the characters are living in this fantasy world where, if Molly is honest about her sin, then nothing bad will happen.

    Er, excuse me? Regency England, anyone? Welcome to the 19th century? Molly is going to suffer for this for the rest of her life. Henry (and everyone) sheltering her from this fact is gonna do her no good.

    Nor is acting like everything’s going to be okay, Mr. Protective Big Brother. Dear Henry, your sister cannot just move past this. Sin is never gonna just go away unless you confront it. And though Molly is perhaps very sorry she conceived, even sorry she gave away her virtue, she is definitely not thinking of it on the level of sin.

    More like an impropriety or an inconvenience of sorts. But what God thinks is what matters … not what society thinks.

    I get where the author was going. She wanted to show that fornication is not a worse sin than any other sin as far as salvation goes – or that’s my best guess.

    But you can’t go about that by making lying seem a lot worse than it is and making fornication similar to dropping a plate on the floor. (Which would be a mistake.) (Unless you threw that plate at someone’s head.) (That’s concussioning thy neighbor.) (Or something to that effect.)

    CONTENT: 4/5

    Language: n/a

    Violence: men are shot and killed or badly wounded, one man murdered in cold blood, others killed during a violent attack on the mill. Some talk about blood, treatment of wounds, etc. A brawl at a public dance leads to many a split lip.

    Sexual: a semi-detailed account of childbearing. Molly has a child out of wedlock and this is treated as a ‘temporary lapse of judgment,’ a ‘mistake,’ and a ‘scandal’ but not as sin which it is (see my whole rant ^^). A couple kisses, a bit detailed.

    Other: MOLLY LIES HEAVEN FORBID THAT MOLLY LIES OH NO WHAT SHALL WE DO!?!?!?!?! Lies are such a terrible sin … worse than any other, in fact …

    Not recommended for readers under sixteen unless they are discerning and won’t be strayed by the confirmation of sin.

    OVERALL: 3/5

    I’m sorry, but I cannot and will not recommend this book to any Christian reader. Secular readers might enjoy it, as it is a great (5-star!) book except for the Molly fiasco. But Christian readers shouldn’t allow this kind of thing in their fiction. It’s abominable.

    Review by Kellyn Roth of

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