Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing the Lies about Who You Are So You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be

Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing the Lies about Who You Are So You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be

With wry wit and hard-earned wisdom, popular online personality and founder of TheChicSite.com founder Rachel Hollis helps readers break free from the lies keeping them from the joy-filled and exuberant life they are meant to have.Founder of the lifestyle website TheChicSite.com and CEO of her own media company, Chic Media, Rachel Hollis has created an online fan base of h...

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Title:Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing the Lies about Who You Are So You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be
Author:Rachel Hollis
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Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing the Lies about Who You Are So You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be Reviews

  • Christy

    Rachel Hollis's newest book

    is just the book I needed to read to start my new year. It's one of those books that made me think about my life, the things I do, and it was a highly entertaining read!

    A few months ago, one of my facebook friends posted about this thing called 'The Last 90 Days'. I read up on it, and I was inspired to make changes to my life and not wait until the first of the year, but do it now. I started getting up earlier, drinking more water, goin

    Rachel Hollis's newest book

    is just the book I needed to read to start my new year. It's one of those books that made me think about my life, the things I do, and it was a highly entertaining read!

    A few months ago, one of my facebook friends posted about this thing called 'The Last 90 Days'. I read up on it, and I was inspired to make changes to my life and not wait until the first of the year, but do it now. I started getting up earlier, drinking more water, going to the gym more, and most importantly, I started making a gratitude list daily. It really changed my perspective on a lot of things. Since then, I started following Rachel Hollis. I love her personality and she has great tips and advice. When I got the opportunity to read this book early, I jumped on it.

    Each chapter is about a lie we're told, and why that lie isn't actually true. It's a motivating read that made me want to go out and conquer the world- or at least my own life! I found Rachel's stories inspiring. This book inspired me to be better, but also not to be so hard on myself when I fail. Laced with humor, relateable stories, and things that will actually resonate and help most of us, I recommend this book to all women. It's a must read!

  • Rachel Hollis

    Because, if I don't think it's worth five stars, what hope is there??

  • Ashlie Elizabeth

    There were parts of this book that were highly motivating and not too coddling, which is always appreciated. One thing that was tough was a constant thread of diet culture and weight loss talk throughout the whole book. The chapter about weight itself was...not great. There is a line where the author says (paraphrased) "science shows you need to eat less and move more, the end!" Where a lot of the other chapters examined the nuance of different issues and talked about developing an internal mono

    There were parts of this book that were highly motivating and not too coddling, which is always appreciated. One thing that was tough was a constant thread of diet culture and weight loss talk throughout the whole book. The chapter about weight itself was...not great. There is a line where the author says (paraphrased) "science shows you need to eat less and move more, the end!" Where a lot of the other chapters examined the nuance of different issues and talked about developing an internal monologue to become more driven, the weight loss chapter felt super icky. It was basically "you shouldn't be fat, you won't be as long as you don't overeat to numb your feelings, and take better care of this body God gave you."

    A lot of other chapters were motivating, but the diet talk (peppered through every chapter) would keep me from recommending this.

  • Sadie Esplin

    Some parts of this book spoke deeply to my soul, and others made me want to punch someone in the face. I struggled with every word she said about diet and body image—what was meant to be uplifting and inspiring was preached as scientific fact from someone with no medical/dietetic credentials. She had nothing to back up her claims, but she preached it like doctrine.

    I also really really really struggled with the story of how she met her husband. I realize have no business being bothered by it, bu

    Some parts of this book spoke deeply to my soul, and others made me want to punch someone in the face. I struggled with every word she said about diet and body image—what was meant to be uplifting and inspiring was preached as scientific fact from someone with no medical/dietetic credentials. She had nothing to back up her claims, but she preached it like doctrine.

    I also really really really struggled with the story of how she met her husband. I realize have no business being bothered by it, but she says herself that people may have issue with her sharing it and that it isn’t meant for it to be used to condone an unhealthy relationship. But....she married the man from her super unhealthy relationship. Guys, don’t marry the guy who “brings you to bars and ignores you while he hits on other women.” Don’t marry the guy who “only calls you at night when he’s been drinking but ignores you during the day.” Don’t marry the guy who you “give your virginity to because you don’t know how else to keep him interested.” I mean, really. She gave so much time to how terrible their first year was and then gives a quick “but now everything is great!” And it just doesn’t work for me.

    I have to come back and discuss more things that are not okay. The diet pills? She essentially tells everyone that she and her roommate survived off of diet pills to the point that they were hallucinating, so they stopped taking them and gained back 40 lbs. She doesn’t discourage this, if anything the quick “oh and then we gained weight and became less attractive” seems like a subtle “I can’t recommend this BUT if you want to lose weight here’s how to do it.” NOT OKAY. Additionally, when people come to her her diet advice (why is she giving diet advice? Is she a dietician? Does she have any medical knowledge) she tells them to start by drinking more water, and when they’ve mastered that start cutting out foods. Here’s an idea: listen to your body!! Thin =/= worthy/good/important.

    Another edit: I was on a plane with my young exhausted kids today and was thinking how an outsider would totally judge my parenting skills, but I gotta do what I gotta do and my in-flight parenting techniques are totally different from day-to-day. Then I remembered how Rachel went off on the totally exhausted mom for giving her kid candy on a plane. Maybe there was more to it that I’m not remembering? But honestly, anyone who has flown with their kids knows the struggle is real.

  • Marin

    I usually don't write long reviews but this book got me really fired up (and not in a good way).

    I was intrigued by this book after I saw some chatter about it on a few book club blogs. Now, I think that if I knew more about Rachel Hollis (or had ever heard of her before picking up her book) I would have definitely passed on this volume - I am generally not a fan of "mommy-blogger" or "social media influencer" content. I also had no idea this was a "Christian" book until I got a few chapters in.

    I usually don't write long reviews but this book got me really fired up (and not in a good way).

    I was intrigued by this book after I saw some chatter about it on a few book club blogs. Now, I think that if I knew more about Rachel Hollis (or had ever heard of her before picking up her book) I would have definitely passed on this volume - I am generally not a fan of "mommy-blogger" or "social media influencer" content. I also had no idea this was a "Christian" book until I got a few chapters in. I have no problem with faith-based content. I just found the Christian-isms to be over the top and altogether too much, which is interesting when other reviews complain that it wasn't faith-based enough.

    If you are into shallow inspirational quotes or advice without anything else to back it up, like "you can do it!" or "hang in there, baby!" (think of those posters of the cat hanging onto a tree branch from the 1990s) then this book is for you. If you are looking for something deeper, meaningful, or mind blowing/life-changing, then this book is not for you. I fell into the latter category. Case in point:

    "I went to a conference last year - the kind where a life guru stands on stage and walks you through guided mediation or yells at you to believe in yourself. I loved every single second of it."

    Yuck.

    After I realized how shallow this book actually was, I became super frustrated with the author's annoying cutesy voice and writing-style and basically hate-read the rest of it. I was uncomfortable and bothered by several aspects of the book, such as the consistently dropped in toxic diet-culture statements (i.e. "if the calories you consume in a day are fewer than the calories you burn off in a day, you will lose weight. The end.") I would roll my eyes at the suggestions like "have sex every day for a month, it will change your sex life" after she JUST talked about not knowing how you get UTIs from sex when she was younger and more ignorant (you wanna know how you get an UTI from sex? Well, having sex every day is definitely one way). The constant "see a therapist!" mantra also rattled me - sure, because ongoing therapy is totally an option for everyone (read: it's not, except for the affluent upper-middle class). Her complete lack of any kind of awareness of her affluence and white privilege until it got a nod for about 1.5 pages near the end was laughable. I also found the "lies" to be less insightful and more reason for Hollis to relay highly vapid and self-centered stories about herself. She just plain annoyed the shit out of me.

  • Jenni

    Ok, maybe I’m the wrong audience for this. Or maybe I shouldn’t have chosen the audiobook narrated by the author. But I just couldn’t finish this

    Mostly, I found the author’s supposed revelations to be really obvious and unenlightening. “It’s important to have self-worth by dumping the guy who uses you as a booty call (but oh yeah I ended up marrying the guy).” “Hey girls, we should support each other instead of judging each other.” And on top of all that, her anecdotes were way too long and self

    Ok, maybe I’m the wrong audience for this. Or maybe I shouldn’t have chosen the audiobook narrated by the author. But I just couldn’t finish this

    Mostly, I found the author’s supposed revelations to be really obvious and unenlightening. “It’s important to have self-worth by dumping the guy who uses you as a booty call (but oh yeah I ended up marrying the guy).” “Hey girls, we should support each other instead of judging each other.” And on top of all that, her anecdotes were way too long and self-aggrandizing. “So I used to make fun of this girl for shaving her toes, when actually I also shaved my own toes!” And unbelievably, right after her chapter on how women shouldn’t judge each other, she makes fun of people like Kim Kardashian for how they got their success...without acknowledging that she comes from an enormous place of privilege herself.

    Thanks but no thanks. To top it off, the audiobook narration by the author had way too much preacher/coddling guru/“let go and let god” vibes. This might resonate more with a younger, evangelical audience.

  • Carrie Rogers

    Girl, stop preaching at me

  • Maddie

    Ughhhh. I wanted to like this!

    Things that irked me:

    -The painfully tone-deaf, privileged, white, conservative, upper-class worldview (one of her personal “goals” that she uses to structure a chapter is literally buying a $1000 Louis Vuitton purse)

    -Frequent mentions of how she’s REALLY good at X/the most organized/the hardest working/the most tenacious/ the biggest nerd you’ve EVER MET (dude, give it a rest)

    -Near constant reminders of how fabulously successful she is (although I’d never heard of

    Ughhhh. I wanted to like this!

    Things that irked me:

    -The painfully tone-deaf, privileged, white, conservative, upper-class worldview (one of her personal “goals” that she uses to structure a chapter is literally buying a $1000 Louis Vuitton purse)

    -Frequent mentions of how she’s REALLY good at X/the most organized/the hardest working/the most tenacious/ the biggest nerd you’ve EVER MET (dude, give it a rest)

    -Near constant reminders of how fabulously successful she is (although I’d never heard of her before picking up this book)

    -Weirdly sporadic “god/your creator has a plan” (more concentrated in the latter half of the book) sprinkled throughout the bland self-help cliches

    It’s like a big long humble brag in narrative form. I rolled my eyes at least once per chapter.

    BUT — if you’re white, wealthy, and Christian, and you like generic self-help offered from the aforementioned perspective, it might work for you. There are some nuggets of wisdom in certain parts; it’s just all stuff I’ve heard and read a thousand times over, and it could’ve been written with a tad more humility and self-awareness. 1.5 stars.

  • Caitlin

    This book is for privileged white women with no real problems but the ones they make up for themselves. I was told this book was “inspiring”. But let’s be real, it’s easy for a rich lady to tell me (or anyone) that I’m “in control of my own life”. Any woman with a husband who makes enough money that you find yourself on the red carpet can say that. I found this book to be very unrelatable and full of humble brags. It was like social media in book form.

    Also, if I hear one more white woman call o

    This book is for privileged white women with no real problems but the ones they make up for themselves. I was told this book was “inspiring”. But let’s be real, it’s easy for a rich lady to tell me (or anyone) that I’m “in control of my own life”. Any woman with a husband who makes enough money that you find yourself on the red carpet can say that. I found this book to be very unrelatable and full of humble brags. It was like social media in book form.

    Also, if I hear one more white woman call other white women her “tribe” I’m going to throw up.

    This book ended up in the trash after reading 50 pages and countless eye rolls.

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