Tomorrow Will Be Different: Love, Loss, and the Fight for Trans Equality

Tomorrow Will Be Different: Love, Loss, and the Fight for Trans Equality

A timely and captivating memoir about gender identity set against the backdrop of the transgender equality movement, by a leading activist and the National Press Secretary for the Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest LGBTQ civil rights organization.Sarah McBride is on a mission to fight for transgender rights around the world. But before she was a prominent activist...

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Title:Tomorrow Will Be Different: Love, Loss, and the Fight for Trans Equality
Author:Sarah McBride
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Edition Language:English

Tomorrow Will Be Different: Love, Loss, and the Fight for Trans Equality Reviews

  • Kendall

    "Amazing Grace."

    That line, repeated over and over again in the midst of the darkest days of her life, says so much about Sarah-- that in the midst of any hardship, she can look for, and see, the hope in the broken and beautiful world we live in.

    I read this book in one sitting (while sobbing on a train next to concerned and loving strangers). It is such a gorgeous, honest, and brilliant lesson for all of us. It's a lesson about what we give to and take from each other. It's a lesson about ordinar

    "Amazing Grace."

    That line, repeated over and over again in the midst of the darkest days of her life, says so much about Sarah-- that in the midst of any hardship, she can look for, and see, the hope in the broken and beautiful world we live in.

    I read this book in one sitting (while sobbing on a train next to concerned and loving strangers). It is such a gorgeous, honest, and brilliant lesson for all of us. It's a lesson about what we give to and take from each other. It's a lesson about ordinary and extraordinary courage. It's a lesson about fighting, raging, and loving without regret, about protecting the people we love, and about choosing grace over fear, even in our darkest hours.

    I am beyond blessed to know first-hand how much it means when Sarah tells us that she will never stop "fight[ing] like hell to make sure that every single one of us is treated with the dignity, respect, and fairness we all deserve."

    I cannot recommend this gorgeous book highly enough.

  • Nancy

    "I'm twenty-four, transgender, and a widow...that's a lot for someone in this society to handle." Sarah McBride

    In Tomorrow Will Be Different, Sarah McBride shares her personal story as inspiration and to put a face on what it is to be transgender.

    Imagine being unable to go into a public restroom in North Carolina without breaking the law. Imagine being unable to change your sex on your state ID, or being unable to keep a job or find housing. Imagine being vilified, ostracized, beaten up, an obje

    "I'm twenty-four, transgender, and a widow...that's a lot for someone in this society to handle." Sarah McBride

    In Tomorrow Will Be Different, Sarah McBride shares her personal story as inspiration and to put a face on what it is to be transgender.

    Imagine being unable to go into a public restroom in North Carolina without breaking the law. Imagine being unable to change your sex on your state ID, or being unable to keep a job or find housing. Imagine being vilified, ostracized, beaten up, an object of fear.

    Nearly fifty years ago my husband 's father's best friend disowned his son when he became a woman. Over the years I heard snippets of the story, how as a child their son loved to play dolls and dress up with his older sisters, how blame was assigned for causing their son's 'problem', the resulting divorce and alienation.

    In the 1990s my husband was approached by a teen from his church, an unhappy and angry child. Some thought she was presenting 'butch' because she was not conventionally pretty, assuming she was a 'pretend lesbian'. My husband affirmed her, but the support she needed from the community was not there. She changed her name and moved away. Today I know he was transgender, and I see on his Facebook page a happy, confident, burly guy with a successful career and a sparkle in his eye. I am so happy for him.

    I wanted to read Tomorrow Will Be Different by Sarah McBride because I had seen her on television and knew she was an intelligent and lovely person. And I wanted to better understand her experience and the work toward equality for all persons.

    The book's preface by Joe Biden is a must read. I recently read his Promise Me, Dad and I heard the same compassion and love in this preface.

    McBride was fascinated by American politics since childhood. Meeting Joe Biden was an unforgettable moment. She interned on Beau Biden's first race. McBride was fifteen when she introduced Jack Markell at the launch for his 2006 race for reelection as state treasurer, and at age eighteen when he ran for governor.

    During these years, McBride outwardly conformed to the gender role socially acceptable, presenting masculine and even dating. She did not want to let anyone down. But she was miserable.

    McBride ran for student president at college to great success and was very popular and led a push to end gender exclusive housing. In her junior year, with great trepidation, McBride announced being transsexual.

    She describes the scene when she came out to her family, her mother in tears. McBride had a gay brother, and her other brother tried to break the ice by announcing, "I'm heterosexual." In a heartwarming scene, McBride tells her fraternity brothers, who enveloped her in an embrace. Beau Biden called her to offer his love and support, as did Joe Biden. The Biden family confirmed her belief that there are still good people in politics.

    McBride repeats how lucky and privileged she has been, knowing that most trans persons lack a support system and her advantages. Throughout the book, she shares the devastating statistics behind the transgender experience: high rates of suicide; verbal harassment and physical assault in public restrooms; legal exemptions that allow discrimination; inability to find housing or keep a job.

    McBride met the love of her life, Andy, who was a few years older and also trans. Tragedy struck when Andy was diagnosed with cancer and underwent surgery and treatment with McBride providing care and support.

    I can't imagine the burden of being twenty-three and watching your beloved struggle with a terminal illness. Both my parents died of cancer, and I was at my Dad's side in the hospital for over two months. My heart broke as I read McBride's story.

    Trans rights advanced under President Obama, then 2016 saw the election of President Trump and Vice President Pence. The gains for equality under the law are being threatened. But McBride has found hope in the young people of our country, those who have been accepted as children for who they are, and who assume that the doors are open to them.

    I pray it is so.

    I received a free ebook from First to Read in exchange for a fair and unbiased review.

  • Kara

    It's hard to not give a book five stars when it made you tear up three times (for three different reasons!) when you're really not a crier.

    Sarah's story is amazing and heartbreaking, and it's particularly engaging if you have an interest in politics.

    My favorite quotes:

    - ...we all live our lives with multiple identities intersecting with one another, creating a mix of privileges and challenges that all people carry with us.

    - ...each time we ask anyone - whether they are transgender, Black, an i

    It's hard to not give a book five stars when it made you tear up three times (for three different reasons!) when you're really not a crier.

    Sarah's story is amazing and heartbreaking, and it's particularly engaging if you have an interest in politics.

    My favorite quotes:

    - ...we all live our lives with multiple identities intersecting with one another, creating a mix of privileges and challenges that all people carry with us.

    - ...each time we ask anyone - whether they are transgender, Black, an immigrant, Muslim, Native American, gay, or a woman - to sit by and let an extended conversation take place about whether they deserve to be respected and affirmed in who they are, we are asking people to watch their own life pass by without dignity or fairness. That is too much to ask of anyone.

    - When young people participate in politics, they can speak from a place of history. I don't mean the history of the past, but rather the history that remains to be written. Young people will be the ones who write the history books of tomorrow.

  • Katya Kazbek

    My one wish right now is that Sarah McBride stays healthy, both physically and mentally, so she can one day become the president of the United States. This is a wish packed with hope: I want to live in the US that can have a woman president, a transgender president, and a young president. Hey, even a progressive president right now seems like a stretch :( Anyway, I also selfishly want Sarah to be happy, because that means that we as a society will benefit from her light, so strong and brave. I a

    My one wish right now is that Sarah McBride stays healthy, both physically and mentally, so she can one day become the president of the United States. This is a wish packed with hope: I want to live in the US that can have a woman president, a transgender president, and a young president. Hey, even a progressive president right now seems like a stretch :( Anyway, I also selfishly want Sarah to be happy, because that means that we as a society will benefit from her light, so strong and brave. I am in absolute awe of the power that this sweet young woman exudes, and the calm, measured way in which she approaches things. Wise, self-aware, loving, incredibly smart and so resilient: a natural born leader, a beacon for change.

    I am queer person who mostly presents as a woman, originally from Russia, now trying to stay in the US. I came here because Russia is terrible for queer people: but that was during Obama. Now, that Trump is in power, being queer, an immigrant, or a woman-presenting person is still better than doing the same in Russia, but not by far. And it's easy to lose hope. But knowing that there are people like Sarah in this world, or her beloved Andy, or all the other folk who are pushing for dignity and equality for everyone on the LGBTQ spectrum, makes me hopeful. I know that this is a country where I can and will belong.

    As I read the book, sometimes sobbing, sometimes smiling warmly, sometimes a little lost in the bureacracy of legislative processes, one thing remained unchanged: I wanted to hug Sarah. I am often cautious about people in politics, and know too well the challenges of activism that sometimes strip a person of humanity in unexpected places. But Sarah gives the air of wholeness. She is still an idealistic doe-eyed kid who wants to be president and makes a DNC diorama, but also an incredibly smart adult who understands how things in politics work. And I think that this balance of the two is exactly what makes her such a promising figure. I really hope that life works out in a way where Sarah's political career progresses further, and that one day I might—who knows?—vote or just campaign for her.

  • Sarah

    I hope I get to vote for President Sarah McBride in twenty years! She has such a strong and compassionate voice that she has already used in such powerful ways at such a young age.

    is an inspirational memoir that details the author's coming out as transgender, her relationship with her late husband, and her work in politics and advocacy for equality for the trans community. It's both uplifting and heartbreaking and I recommend it for anyone interested in politics or st

    I hope I get to vote for President Sarah McBride in twenty years! She has such a strong and compassionate voice that she has already used in such powerful ways at such a young age.

    is an inspirational memoir that details the author's coming out as transgender, her relationship with her late husband, and her work in politics and advocacy for equality for the trans community. It's both uplifting and heartbreaking and I recommend it for anyone interested in politics or stories of transgender people.

  • Emily

    I really enjoyed this!

    The writing is quite simple, and at times I wish it had been a bit more literary, but I can appreciate that the writing style makes this more acceptable to people who may not know much about LGBTQIA+ (and specifically trans) issues.

    I really loved how much emphasis McBride puts on intersectionality. While she is very open about her own struggles with discrimination as a trans woman, she is always quick to emphasize her own privileges. She reiterates how violence against tra

    I really enjoyed this!

    The writing is quite simple, and at times I wish it had been a bit more literary, but I can appreciate that the writing style makes this more acceptable to people who may not know much about LGBTQIA+ (and specifically trans) issues.

    I really loved how much emphasis McBride puts on intersectionality. While she is very open about her own struggles with discrimination as a trans woman, she is always quick to emphasize her own privileges. She reiterates how violence against trans women of color, particularly black trans women, is an issue that is unfortunately becoming

    common. I also love how she addresses issues around "passing" i.e. being a trans person who is feminine/masculine enough to seem cisgendered. She acknowledges that passing can help her platform as a public figure, but pushes back against the idea that trans people are people because Look! They look like real women/men! Trans people are real women and men because that is

    not because of how they present.

    I also loved reading her love story with her late husband, Andy. That elicited a STRONG emotional response from me.

    Overall, I would definitely recommend this. Even if at times I got annoyed that things like "POTUS" were explained, I really enjoyed reading this.

  • Donna

    This is an autobiography of the author's struggle and journey of being transgender.....and I think that is the part I liked the most. She covered her inner turmoil with identifying as transgender, coming out to her family, friends, coworkers and trying to find her place on the spectrum of womanhood. This felt honest and I liked how she told her story. She is an activist for transgender rights and has seen much change. But even with the legislative changes and increased awareness many who are tra

    This is an autobiography of the author's struggle and journey of being transgender.....and I think that is the part I liked the most. She covered her inner turmoil with identifying as transgender, coming out to her family, friends, coworkers and trying to find her place on the spectrum of womanhood. This felt honest and I liked how she told her story. She is an activist for transgender rights and has seen much change. But even with the legislative changes and increased awareness many who are transgender still feel the need to be invisible. I was completely pulled in to her story.

    Now parts of this felt long. Sometimes she was just too polite and that approach seemed to drag out some of the bullet points. But overall, this was informative and heartfelt. So 4 stars.

  • Michael

    Succinct and affecting,

    recounts activist Sarah McBride’s experience of coming out as a trans woman. The memoir is roughly divided into three parts: McBride’s transition process as a college student, her role in advancing groundbreaking trans legislation in Delaware, and her romance and marriage to her first love, who tragically died of cancer in 2014. Unlike some readers who found the second part to be a slog, I thought the memoir was consistently compelling. McBride

    Succinct and affecting,

    recounts activist Sarah McBride’s experience of coming out as a trans woman. The memoir is roughly divided into three parts: McBride’s transition process as a college student, her role in advancing groundbreaking trans legislation in Delaware, and her romance and marriage to her first love, who tragically died of cancer in 2014. Unlike some readers who found the second part to be a slog, I thought the memoir was consistently compelling. McBride writes simple, clear prose that seems designed to be accessible to anyone, and her observations about LGBT politics are insightful and intersectional, if not especially groundbreaking. McBride has a bright future in politics, and her life story is well worth checking out.

  • Jenna

    Sarah McBride is a trans-gender activist and was the first openly trans-gender person to address a major party convention. This book is a memoir of her coming out and transitioning, but it is also about her activism and fighting

    Sarah McBride is a trans-gender activist and was the first openly trans-gender person to address a major party convention. This book is a memoir of her coming out and transitioning, but it is also about her activism and fighting for trans-gender peoples' rights and protection. I loved the parts about her personally, though found some of the parts about her meetings with various government officials a bit boring. At the same time, her work is extremely important and thus the book is too.

    Being cis-gender, I can't totally understand what it is like to be a trans-gender person and thus it is very important for me to read their accounts, hear their thoughts, know the struggles they face. As a lesbian, I can relate to some aspects of Sarah's struggles, like "coming out" and facing discrimination and hatred simply because of who I am, something I cannot change. When I look back to how things were for the LGBTQ community when I first came out 25 years ago, I am amazed and gladdened by all the positive changes. And yet we still have a long way to go, still have much to fight for. This is even more true for the trans-gender community. For this reason, it is extremely important for trans-gender people to be represented in government and in entertainment. We need to see more of them, increase their visibility, show people they are just like us and we have nothing to fear from them. Whilst I don't understand being born into the wrong gender body, I don't understand more how people can be bothered by people who are. How someone can hate someone merely because they are. I hope people will become more understanding and empathetic towards all minorities. No one should have to worry about losing their family, their job, their homes merely because of who they are. No one should have to worry about being vilified, beaten up, or even killed because of who they are. However, seeing how peoples' attitudes towards gay people have changed in 25 years, I am optimistic that attitudes towards trans-gender people will as well.

    Ms. McBride is a wonderful person, intelligent, empathetic, strong, and compassionate and all of these attributes shines through in her writing. We need more leaders like her, and I am glad she is involved in politics. Perhaps she will be our first trans-gender president 14 years from now! I hope many people will read this book. Even though I found bits of it repetitive, it is still very well written. Ms. McBride is so open about her own struggles, thoughts, and feelings, and she brings to light the many problems trans-gender people currently face in this country. I remain hopeful that this will soon change. We CAN do better!

    3.5 stars rounded up to 4.

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