Brain Food: The Surprising Science of Eating for Cognitive Power

Brain Food: The Surprising Science of Eating for Cognitive Power

How to eat for maximum brain power and health from an expert in both neuroscience and nutrition. Like our bodies, our brains have very specific food requirements. And in this eye-opening book from an author who is both a neuroscientist and a certified integrative nutritionist, we learn what should be on our menu.Dr. Lisa Mosconi, whose research spans an extraordinary rang...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Brain Food: The Surprising Science of Eating for Cognitive Power
Author:Lisa Mosconi
Rating:

Brain Food: The Surprising Science of Eating for Cognitive Power Reviews

  • Kelly Knapp

    I have read books and articles claiming that playing certain games will help keep your brain strong and ward off dementias and Alzheimer's. This seemed plausible, but did not explain why these illnesses are in an upswing...some have claimed our longer lives as the culprit, however, after reading Mosconi's book, I suspect that our poor diets have much to do with the problems.

    The book is very readable, and designed for the general reader, not just for other business cohorts.

  • Sharon

    I lost 2-3 pounds reading this book! That sounds funny, but it's true. This is the best and most profound book I've read on such a subject. When it's published, several in my immediate family will receive a copy from me. And I want to give my ARC copy to another, so I'll buy one for myself. That's how much I think of the book. It's going to change my life. Today I went grocery shopping, list in hand, to a health food store I already frequent. My husband seemed spellbound and dubious.

    The book is

    I lost 2-3 pounds reading this book! That sounds funny, but it's true. This is the best and most profound book I've read on such a subject. When it's published, several in my immediate family will receive a copy from me. And I want to give my ARC copy to another, so I'll buy one for myself. That's how much I think of the book. It's going to change my life. Today I went grocery shopping, list in hand, to a health food store I already frequent. My husband seemed spellbound and dubious.

    The book is about eating in a way that creates a healthy environment for your brain and heart, and your whole body, of course. Although I've read similar books, none has motivated me like this one. I can't praise it enough. Is it for everyone? Yes. But no. The truth is, some people may read it and change nothing; you know them. They already know everything and aren't going to change. If you are interested in getting healthier in a doable way, this book might help you.

    I lost those couple pounds doing only a few of the suggestions. It will take time to incorporate the things I don't already do. I was partway there already. And it's easy to see that even if you don't follow the suggestions to the letter, your entire body will benefit from changes you make at the start. Small changes work and are better than doing nothing. Much of this is easy, unless you are starting from no healthy eating, and then, it's doubly important that you do something to get healthier. There are three levels near the end, places where you might be starting from with suggestions and steps to help you get started. You find that level by taking a test, easy questions about what you do now. The test can be taken again and again, as you progress.

    So gentle readers, if you care about your health and especially your brain and how to avoid dementia, Alzheimer's and more, this book might be the one that changes your life for the better. The book is pure science. It's well researched and written by an author who lives what she knows. It's written in an easy-to-read way with tables and all kinds of helpful information. Readers will learn much about the brain and workings of the body as pertains to nutrition and more. There are recipes and apparently more advice and recipes online. In my house, the book will be often referenced until I have it all memorized enough that it comes naturally.

    I have ingredients now to make a couple of the recipes and they sound good and easy. There are also recipes for your sweet tooth, and some of the changes are super easy and beneficial to not only your brain but other organs. If everyone ate this way, doctors might not have as much to do!

    This book came to me from LibraryThing as an ARC copy for review.

  • Karolyn Sherwood

    If every adult read BRAIN FOOD, by Lisa Mosconi, it might change the course of history. A non-fiction book like this, one that makes bold claims about health matters, is entirely dependent on the author's credentials. Lisa Mosconi has the right credentials: She has a duel PhD in neuroscience and Nuclear Medicine, and is a board-certified integrative nutritionist and holistic health-care practitioner; she is the associate director of the Alzheimer's Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medical Coll

    If every adult read BRAIN FOOD, by Lisa Mosconi, it might change the course of history. A non-fiction book like this, one that makes bold claims about health matters, is entirely dependent on the author's credentials. Lisa Mosconi has the right credentials: She has a duel PhD in neuroscience and Nuclear Medicine, and is a board-certified integrative nutritionist and holistic health-care practitioner; she is the associate director of the Alzheimer's Prevention Clinic at Weill Cornell Medical College/New York-Presbyterian Hospital; she was an associate professor of neuroscience in neurology; she was the director of the Nutrition and Brain Fitness Lab at NYU School of Medicine, et al. If this isn't enough for you, read more about her at lisamosconi.com.

    Mosconi states on page 11: "What most people don't know is that less than 1 percent of the population develops Alzheimer's because of a rare genetic mutation in their DNA ... for the remaining 99 percent of us, the real risk is not determined by our genes." She claims Alzheimer's

    is due primarily to our diet, and I believe her! I will take her advice and do what she says. The following 300 pages of the book give support for her thesis, as well as guidelines for fat, protein and carbohydrate intakes; a questionnaire to help everyone who eats evaluate their diet; recipes and lifestyle choices;and much more. This is a book that could either be shelved on a wise person's book case, or in the kitchen for easy access to the best recipes.

    Additionally, Mosconi gives us advice backed by science without sounding preachy. The facts speak for themselves. She offers encyclopedic knowledge and holistic direction for every aspect of diet and behaviors on how to avoid one of the most horrific diseases known to man. I know this science will continue to evolve, so I plan to stay on top of it because my mother has Alzheimer's. With the help of Lisa Mosconi and BRAIN FOOD, I am determined to do everything I can to avoid it.

    FIVE brilliant STARS

  • Michele

    I'm rating this book 5 stars because it has inspired me to provide healthier food for my family. Great scientific backing. I plan on reading this book again if I need a boost in healthy living inspiration. Working in health care, I see the influence poor lifestyle choices can have on an individual. It's hard work to constantly provide whole, healthy food for a busy family-but this book reinforces why it's worth the effort.

  • Kathleen

    Mosconi is an Assistant Professor of Neuroscience in Neurology and the Associate Director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic, Weill Cornell Medical College. Her research interests lie in using PET and MRI imaging in the early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Clearly, Mosconi knows what she is talking about!

    All of us know someone who is (or has) suffered from dementia—particularly Alzheimer’s. It is a horrific disease that we hope and pray doesn’t visit us in our later years. Mosconi makes a s

    Mosconi is an Assistant Professor of Neuroscience in Neurology and the Associate Director of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic, Weill Cornell Medical College. Her research interests lie in using PET and MRI imaging in the early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. Clearly, Mosconi knows what she is talking about!

    All of us know someone who is (or has) suffered from dementia—particularly Alzheimer’s. It is a horrific disease that we hope and pray doesn’t visit us in our later years. Mosconi makes a strong case that we can avoid getting Alzheimer’s if we pay attention to what are brains need now.

    o Less than 1% of the population develops Alzheimer’s because of a rare mutation in their DNA.

    o Most forms of cognitive decline associated with brain aging is linked to diet and exercise.

    o Nearly a third of Alzheimer’s cases could be prevented.

    o The brain is the one part of the body most easily damaged by a poor diet.

    o Our brains require a lot of energy—consuming 20% of our energy intake.

    o Dehydration accelerates brain shrinkage that occurs with aging and dementia—drinking 8-10 cups of water a day can boost the brain’s performance by almost 30%.

    o Omega 6s are pro-inflammatory; Omega 3s are anti-inflammatory. The balance of these two fats should be 2:1 for optimal neuron communication. Americans consume 20-30:1 causing excess inflammation that contribute to atherosclerosis, arthritis, vascular disease, autoimmune processes, tumor proliferation, and—you guessed it—Alzheimer’s.

    o So—give up animal fatty foods, and start eating flaxseed, walnuts, chia, wheat germ and fatty fish (salmon, mackerel, cod).

    o Don’t partake of sugar or sugar substitutes, but focus on low glycemic/high fiber foods instead.

    o Mosconi is also concerned about the amount of copper in our diets. She refers to new research that suggests that the copper we ingest in our modern diet is enough to increase the chances of Alzheimer’s.

    Not surprisingly, Mosconi also lists the ‘usual suspects’ in maintaining healthy brains—exercise, undergoing tasks requiring an active brain (i.e., reading, playing music) and sleep among them.

    She prefers organically raised food-stuffs.

    Clearly, we should all pay more attention to keeping our brains healthy. Highly Recommend.

  • Blaine Morrow

    Mosconi summarizes brain research that links diet with cognitive functionality, and provides clear suggestions for improving what you eat to stave off mental disease (particularly dementia and Alzheimer's).

  • Courtney

    I wanted to like this book more.

    Lisa Mosconi has excellent credentials-trained in Neuroscience and Nutrition-that give her the research-backed clout to speak to the kind of food that would make our brain work better. However, while I can get behind her basic recommendations to eat more fish and vegetables because they contain goodies the brain needs to operate its best, there were other claims that I did not see any science behind. For example, her #1 recommendation is that all produce must be

    I wanted to like this book more.

    Lisa Mosconi has excellent credentials-trained in Neuroscience and Nutrition-that give her the research-backed clout to speak to the kind of food that would make our brain work better. However, while I can get behind her basic recommendations to eat more fish and vegetables because they contain goodies the brain needs to operate its best, there were other claims that I did not see any science behind. For example, her #1 recommendation is that all produce must be organic and non-GMO to the point that even frozen organic produce is better than fresh non-organic. While this is certainly a hotly contested topic, she doesn't provide any of her scientific reasoning behind this claim. Mosconi qualifies throughout that any produce is better than none at all, but her continued insistence on the ease and affordability of organic and non-GMO items is wearing by the end of the book. Not only does she not support these claims with evidence, she is alienating a large portion of the population that can see the stark difference in associated cost. At the end of the book I just found myself annoyed, skeptical, and less willing to follow any recommendations as a result.

    If you follow the recommendations given, I have no doubt you will be healthier (if from nothing other than cutting our dairy and sugar). But, as with all popular science books, all claims should be evaluated on your own terms.

  • Jane Stewart

    I don’t know whether to give this a 2 for below average or 3 for interesting.

    There were many interesting things in the book, but it lacked scientific research. Most of it felt like her personal opinion. Some of her advice follows.

    All food must be organic, no GMOs. Cattle must be organic grass fed. Chickens must be raised outdoors cage free on organic food. All animals must be antibiotic and hormone free.

    GMOs:

    My understanding of GMOs: they are all different. Some corn is designed to make cattle

    I don’t know whether to give this a 2 for below average or 3 for interesting.

    There were many interesting things in the book, but it lacked scientific research. Most of it felt like her personal opinion. Some of her advice follows.

    All food must be organic, no GMOs. Cattle must be organic grass fed. Chickens must be raised outdoors cage free on organic food. All animals must be antibiotic and hormone free.

    GMOs:

    My understanding of GMOs: they are all different. Some corn is designed to make cattle get fatter faster. Other GMOs are trying to find a better tasting vegetable or one with more vitamins. Some GMOs are for better resistance to pests or pesticides. Some GMOs are for longer shelf lives. To my knowledge there are no studies that support the author’s recommendation to avoid all GMOs. She mentions no research.

    Salt:

    Instead of talking about how much salt to consume she says add no more than the tip of a teaspoon for the day. But the starting point is different for people depending on whether they cook or buy prepared foods. She should talk about milligrams for the day, not a tip of the teaspoon for everyone. She also recommends avoiding the commonly bought grocery store salt because it has additives. She prefers sea rock salt and pink Himalayan salt due to more minerals and no additives. But would this be undesirable? Grocery store salt might be the only way many of us get iodine in our diet. She does not discuss iodine.

    Water:

    She says there is debate over how much water we need. Some experts recommend eight 8-ounce glasses per day. So that is what she recommends.

    She says purified water is incapable of hydrating the brain, but she has no study or research supporting that statement.

    Brain neurons:

    The author made confusing statements about neurons. Early in book she said neurons are irreplaceable. Later in the book she said neurons continue to grow. And later she said a reduced calory diet promotes growth of new neurons. I was intrigued with Johanna’s review. She said the 1998 study by Dr. Fred H. Gage and Peter Eriksson found that the human brain can give rise to new neurons throughout life. They also found that exercise and cognitive enrichment can increase the brain’s ability to generate more neurons. This author made no mention of this.

    Blue Zones:

    Blue Zones are five regions in the world where people live to be 100. They have the lowest incidence of heart disease, obesity, diabetes and dementia. I wish the author would have given a complete list of foods consumed in each area. She did not. She mentioned a few foods in each area. I did find some of the differences interesting.

    Italy: fish, olive oil, coffee

    Icaria, Greece: coffee

    Okinawa, Japan: fish, green tea, brown rice, soy products

    Costa Rica: white rice, coffee

    Loma Linda California: no coffee or tea

    India:

    Americans are 8 times more likely to get Altzheimers than Indians. Although Indians have shorter lives. Some believe that curry spices (turmeric and cumin) are the reason for the lower rate of Alzheimers. But there haven’t been enough studies to prove it. A thought: none of the Blue Zones consume curry.

    AUDIOBOOK NARRATOR:

    Norah Tocci was fine.

    DATA:

    368 pages. Book Copyright: 2018. Genre: Health Nonfiction.

  • Kari Yergin

    Water is the most important nutrient for your brain. Start out with a big glass of water upon waking, and the day with a cup of herbal tea, and drink at least 8 glasses of 8 ounces of water each day, room temp. Also eat water rich foods like

    Watermelon strawberries grapefruit cantaloupe and peaches, in that order.

    Cucumber lettuce zucchini radishes and celery, in that order

    Eat less than 13 g of saturated fat a day or the equivalent of three slices of bacon. I should check how many grams are in sa

    Water is the most important nutrient for your brain. Start out with a big glass of water upon waking, and the day with a cup of herbal tea, and drink at least 8 glasses of 8 ounces of water each day, room temp. Also eat water rich foods like

    Watermelon strawberries grapefruit cantaloupe and peaches, in that order.

    Cucumber lettuce zucchini radishes and celery, in that order

    Eat less than 13 g of saturated fat a day or the equivalent of three slices of bacon. I should check how many grams are in salami, eggs, hamburger, hotdog, ice cream, Greek yogurt.

    Trans fats. Aim for zero! Trans fats are always in processed foods. If one serving has less than .5 g they can collect zero, FYI. But who really eat one serving? Anything that says hydrogenated has trans fats. Soybean oil, cottonseed oil, Palm kernel oil, and vegetable oil are all hydrogenated. Most spreadable butter type products, coffee creamer, margarine sticks, ready to spread frosting.

    PUFA’s are good for you. Poly unsaturated fats

    Veggies fruits beans nuts are the base of the Mediterranean food pyramid

    Whole grains

    Wild caught fish

    Meat and dairy are occasional indulgences

    Herbs and spices are used freely to limit the use of that. Suites are limited to Sunday treats or special occasions and are more natural and fruity than ours usually are. EVOO

    Red wine.

    Meals are consumed in the company of others and savored while sitting at a table.

    Mind diet: Three servings of whole grains plus a salad and an additional vegetable every single day. Plus a glass of wine. Legumes every other day. And poultry and berries twice a week. Fish once a week. Limit high-fat dairy, meat, fried and sweetened

    Plant-based foods should take up the majority of your plate at all meals. Whole Fruits at least once a day, whole grains and legumes at least four times a week.

    Lindt Lindor dark chocolate truffles are only 5 g of fat and just about all you really need if you have a sweet craving

    Brown rice with vegetables and brewers yeast to make it sort of cheesy.

    Goat cheese with berries and a touch of honey for breakfast

    Grilled sweet potatoes with fresh spinach salad will satisfy a sugar craving

    Cereal if you must have it should never have more than 5 g of sugar per serving. Just go with the plain whole grain type and you’re good.

    Brussels sprouts washed, cut in half and roasted in avo oil 350 20 min. Add sweet potatoes and coco oil

    Root soup: carrots rutabaga butternut squash parsnips an onion garlic. Wash peel and cut. Sauté in coco oil. Cover w/ veggie broth. Cool over medium 20 min. Purée immersion blender. Serve with drizzle of avo oil or cilantro and coco cream dollop.

    At least one cup of veggies with lunch

    Mostly berries and citrus fruit. Bananas at the most once a week

    Raw nuts and seeds but not flavored ones.

    See you in soups and salads, yogurt and cereal. And smoothies, of course. Sunflower greR for zinc.

    From peanut butter to natural almond butter

    Sweet potatoes! 2-3 times week

    Whole-grain two times a day. Two or more legumes every week. Buddha bowls

    fish: add lox to whole-grain toast. Fish and chips made with whole-grain pretzels coding tilapia cooked in coconut oil. Canned salmon. Try anchovies, sardines, mackerel. Aim for three servings of fish a week.

    Drastically reduce frequency of red meat and pork and also focus on the quality of the meet. Shoot for only 3 ounces of meat twice a week and two eggs a week. Or at the most 4 ounces of poultry and three eggs a week Have at least three days of no meat, no eggs. If you must have beef, grass fed at the most once a week, 3oz grilled and make sure to eat veggies with it.

    Cheese: feta, goat, Parmesan, aged cheddar 1-2 oz per week!

    Plain unsweetened yogurt 1 c a day. Full fat. Organic

    EVOO. Stay away from all refined oil.

    Dark chocolate and almonds when needing a sweet.

    Water!! Glass of lime or lemon water for breakfast.

    Cacao smoothie recipe. Cacao tea.

    Sweetener: raw honey NOT pasteurized.

    Intermediate:

    Overnight fasting

    Be more adventurous: wild caught, Brazil nuts, goji berries.

    More Organic veggies and fruits: greens

    Try roasting beets.

    Boysenberries

    This occasionally

    More consistent nuts and seeds, raw. Toast them yourself if you want. Put on salad

    PB swap for nat’l almond butter (no more than 1T)

    No pasta. Ancient grains. And stuff made with them. Serve with legumes to make perfect protein.

    No deli meat or bacon or processed. Crackers, ins oatmeal, spreads, ready to eat meals, frozen dinners. Sugar (instead use raw honey, real maple syrup, coconut sugar)

    Try salmon roe.

    Try full fat goat yogurt

    Apple cider vinegar 1T and lemon in glass of water plus a little sweetener. Instead of an energy drink.

    Portion size: larger lunch, smallest meal at dinner.

    Try her muesli and avocado toast recipes

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.