Finding the Love of Jesus from Genesis to Revelation

Finding the Love of Jesus from Genesis to Revelation

In this sweeping overview of the Bible, Elyse Fitzpatrick reveals how each section--the Law, history, poetry, epistles--points to God's eternal love for you and the good news of redemption through Christ. You'll find yourself drawn to the Bible like never before as you begin to see Jesus on every page....

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Title:Finding the Love of Jesus from Genesis to Revelation
Author:Elyse M. Fitzpatrick
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Finding the Love of Jesus from Genesis to Revelation Reviews

  • Amy

    As one who has struggled understanding the Love of God for me personally, this book really hit home for me! I loved the way Elyse draws our attention to God and His plan of redemption because of His great love for us- especially women!- throughout the sections of Scripture. Each chapter helped me understand how to see Him and His love, and the questions after each one we’re so helpful to begin the process of doing it on my own! I highly recommend this book for anyone who wants to fro more in lov

    As one who has struggled understanding the Love of God for me personally, this book really hit home for me! I loved the way Elyse draws our attention to God and His plan of redemption because of His great love for us- especially women!- throughout the sections of Scripture. Each chapter helped me understand how to see Him and His love, and the questions after each one we’re so helpful to begin the process of doing it on my own! I highly recommend this book for anyone who wants to fro more in love with Jesus and His Word of love to us!

  • Kendra Fletcher

    I’m a fan of Elyse Fitzpatrick’s writing because without fail, she highlights Jesus Christ, front and center.

    Here, she beautifully points to the gospel over and over throughout her discussion of scripture. She makes me want to read the Bible. She reminds the reader that there isn’t anything more important than seeing the story of redemption woven from Genesis to Revelation.

    I was encouraged to approach my Bible reading with the overarching view that God is for me, and that He loves me. Sometime

    I’m a fan of Elyse Fitzpatrick’s writing because without fail, she highlights Jesus Christ, front and center.

    Here, she beautifully points to the gospel over and over throughout her discussion of scripture. She makes me want to read the Bible. She reminds the reader that there isn’t anything more important than seeing the story of redemption woven from Genesis to Revelation.

    I was encouraged to approach my Bible reading with the overarching view that God is for me, and that He loves me. Sometimes I miss that when I’m reading the law or David’s discouragement or Lamentations. But Jesus is there, too, and if you need a solid reminder, Finding the Love of Jesus may be it.

  • Debbie

    In the first third of this book, the author talked about who was on the road to Emmaus with Jesus and what she was going to talk about in the rest of the book. I got impatient waiting for the actual study to begin, then I was disappointed with how brief the study was. Anyway, the author feels that the Jews of Jesus' time did not know how to properly interpret the Old Testament and that, after his resurrection, Jesus had to teach his disciples to see him in the Old Testament. So she is trying to

    In the first third of this book, the author talked about who was on the road to Emmaus with Jesus and what she was going to talk about in the rest of the book. I got impatient waiting for the actual study to begin, then I was disappointed with how brief the study was. Anyway, the author feels that the Jews of Jesus' time did not know how to properly interpret the Old Testament and that, after his resurrection, Jesus had to teach his disciples to see him in the Old Testament. So she is trying to teach us what she felt Jesus taught them.

    She went through some stories and verses in Genesis, Ruth, Esther, Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Isaiah, Daniel, and some other places to show us how to look for Jesus. We are to look for appearances of Jesus (like as the Angel of the Lord), prophecy about Jesus, types of Jesus (where a person's life had some similarities to Jesus and what he went through), and echoes of the gospel. She then taught that the law is any verse where we are commanded to do something while the gospel is any verse where God does the work. She feels that people only look for the places where we are supposed to do something and miss that this is in response to something God has done.

    I do believe that we encounter and learn about God in the Bible, not just learn about events that happened or how we should live. I would agree that you can find Jesus all throughout the Old Testament. But the author repeatedly stated that ALL of the stories (while true events) are actually about Jesus (not the Trinity, but Jesus). That meant that some of her examples were a bit of a stretch. And some things she said left me saying, "Uh, where did she get that?" However, if you're surprised to learn that Eve received a prophecy about Jesus or that God personally led the Israelites in the Exodus, then this book might provide new insights for you.

    I received an ebook review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.

  • Ben

    There is quite a bit in this book about seeing Jesus in the Old Testament, and it is so good! It is a wonderful textbook and teaching tool presenting the reality that we can see the truth of the Gospel and the revelation of Jesus Christ on every page of Scripture.

    It is a great reminder, and learning experience, to read through this book. Thank you, Elyse, for your wisdom and writing and passion for this book! 

    The place where I think I picked this book up by accident is that it is seemingly writt

    There is quite a bit in this book about seeing Jesus in the Old Testament, and it is so good! It is a wonderful textbook and teaching tool presenting the reality that we can see the truth of the Gospel and the revelation of Jesus Christ on every page of Scripture.

    It is a great reminder, and learning experience, to read through this book. Thank you, Elyse, for your wisdom and writing and passion for this book! 

    The place where I think I picked this book up by accident is that it is seemingly written very intentionally to an audience of women. This confused me when I first began reading because when I read the abstract I didn't catch that it was a book written by a woman for women--I simply thought it was helping Bible readers see Jesus through all of Scripture! Again, it sort of is that. 

    I really enjoyed certain parts of the book, but it seemed as if some of the insertions speaking directly to women were out of place like there were two books combined into one. My one main critique of the book is that it felt as if I were reading two different books at the same time. I didn't connect specifically with the portions written to women, but I connected very well with the portions about finding the love of Jesus in the Old and New Testaments! 

    I would like to recommend this book to a wider audience than just women, but I wouldn't be able to without the caveat that the target audience of the author appears to be specifically women, though the content is applicable for both men and women.

  • Joan

    Fitzpatrick looks at the story of Jesus and the two disciples on the way to Emmaus and concludes, “All of Moses' writings, the Psalms, and the Prophets were actually about him, his suffering, his glorification.” (Loc 1654/2159) She is quite clear that the Old Testament does not merely contain references to or truths about Jesus. She writes that Jesus was saying that “everything he read,” that is, the Old Testament, was about himself. (Loc 260/2159) Fitzpatrick also reminds readers that Jesus lov

    Fitzpatrick looks at the story of Jesus and the two disciples on the way to Emmaus and concludes, “All of Moses' writings, the Psalms, and the Prophets were actually about him, his suffering, his glorification.” (Loc 1654/2159) She is quite clear that the Old Testament does not merely contain references to or truths about Jesus. She writes that Jesus was saying that “everything he read,” that is, the Old Testament, was about himself. (Loc 260/2159) Fitzpatrick also reminds readers that Jesus loves women, loves to instruct them.

    That really piqued my interest because there are some Old Testament passages that troubled me as a woman. There are OT passages that value women much below men. An example is Lev. 27:4 where the value for a man's vow is 50 shekels while a woman's is 30. Fitzpatrick had emphasized Jesus' love and honor for women so I was interested to see how these kinds of passage would be interpreted.

    But I was disappointed. Fitzpatrick picks the typical examples of Abraham, Hagar, Ruth, Esther, etc., that show gospel qualities. She doesn't choose a story like the unnamed woman in Judges 19 who died because of being abused by a mob, thanks to a Levite.

    Fitzpatrick went from assuring readers that ALL the Old Testament was about Jesus to picking out stories and passages that can be related to Jesus and His work. Rereading Luke 24:27 it seems to me that Jesus explained all the parts of the Old Testament that were about Himself, not ever claiming that the entire Old Testament was about Himself.

    Fitzpatrick brings up an interesting concept about finding Messianic fulfillment meaning in all Bible passages. She notes that reading the Old Testament this way means “we often have to hold two sometimes very different meanings in mind at the same time.” (Loc 1304/2159) She is clear that we do not ignore the original intent of the passage yet see Jesus in it too. In this way, the Proverbs 31 woman becomes a description of the bride of Christ. (Loc 1171/2159)

    I have mixed feelings about this study. I think Fitzpatrick makes way too many assumptions, like that Clopas' wife was Jesus' aunt. This is based on John 19:25 where Fitzpatrick concludes that the sister of Jesus' mother is the same as Clopas' wife. There was no punctuation in the original Greek but modern translators insert a comma, making them separate people. Fitzpatrick argues that Clopas and his wife were the two disciples on the way to Emmaus. We just don't know that.

    I would think this study would be best done in a group setting so these issues could be discussed and not just taken at face value. There are questions included for discussion or personal reflection.

    I received a complimentary egalley of this book from the publisher. My comments are an independent and honest review.

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