Finding the Love of Jesus from Genesis to Revelation

Finding the Love of Jesus from Genesis to Revelation

In this sweeping overview of the Bible, Elyse Fitzpatrick reveals how each section--the Law, history, poetry, epistles--points to God's eternal love for you and the good news of redemption through Christ. You'll find yourself drawn to the Bible like never before as you begin to see Jesus on every page....

DownloadRead Online
Title:Finding the Love of Jesus from Genesis to Revelation
Author:Elyse M. Fitzpatrick
Rating:

Finding the Love of Jesus from Genesis to Revelation Reviews

  • Schuyler

    A few months ago I noticed a new book of hers on Amazon, and I was excited that it might be one of my options in the Bethany House review program. Sure enough, it was. Finding the Love of Jesus From Genesis to Revelation is well worth adding to your TBR. It will help you rediscover the Scripture with a whole new appreciation.

    Elyse starts with a Biblical framework, exploring some faulty reasons Christians have for reading their Bibles, (morality studies, daily fire insurance from problems, etc.)

    A few months ago I noticed a new book of hers on Amazon, and I was excited that it might be one of my options in the Bethany House review program. Sure enough, it was. Finding the Love of Jesus From Genesis to Revelation is well worth adding to your TBR. It will help you rediscover the Scripture with a whole new appreciation.

    Elyse starts with a Biblical framework, exploring some faulty reasons Christians have for reading their Bibles, (morality studies, daily fire insurance from problems, etc.) Instead, she points out that the Bible is about Christ. Using the example of Jesus walking on the Emmaus road in Luke 24, she says that since he found himself in all the Scriptures, we should look for him in the Old Testament too.

    As a side note, something she said blew my mind: Jesus read the Scriptures growing up knowing he was the central figure. They were all about him. That left me in awe because any normal human facing that would collapse under the pride, but Jesus was able to read something that was entirely about himself while maintaining his sinlessness.

    Elyse spends the majority of the rest of the book demonstrating how to take on a Christ-centered mindset in reading the Old Testament. Because she's writing to women, she explores some biblical accounts about women, including Esther and Deborah. But she also goes into men, including Job and Moses. At the end of each chapter, she offers questions which encourage readers to respond to the chapter and to dig into Scripture for themselves. While I couldn't do them in the initial read-through, I'd really like to come back to them. This book is a great choice to jumpstart morning devotions, to study with a group, or even to gift someone who likes studying the Scriptures. Its primary focus is to point us all to what Christ did and how he loves his people.

    I'm still working through a couple of points in the book that my heart isn't quite with yet. I understand the point about the Bible not being about us (and Elyse does a really good job explaining what is still about us, especially in the chapter about the law) but there's something about my understanding of that perspective that still bothers me, and I haven't worked through it yet. That's not the fault of the book. It's just where I'm at in my spiritual maturing. Also, another point she made about the law was frustrating at first, but let to a really neat lightbulb moment this morning. She said, "What this third use [of the law] should not do, however, is cause us to think that our grateful obedience earns God's love for us. So, should we strive to love in response to his love? Yes, of course. But whatever we accomplish in our striving, none of it merits God's love or care for us. We can't be good enough, but he loves us anyway." Initially, I felt frustrated since I was hearing, "Nothing you can do earns God's favor, but still do good anyway." I didn't really see the point of doing that just in itself. But I had more to learn.

    A missing piece of my understanding fell into place listening to Michael Card this weekend. He's talking about hesed: God's extravagant favors to us, and how he wants his children to ask for favors even though we know we don't deserve them. The extravagant love of hesed, he said, hopes for and wants a response from us in like kind. An example of that would be the sinful woman, whom Jesus has forgiven much, and who washes his feet with her tears, anointing them with oil. That's extravagant hesed in return for extravagant hesed. It's not about earning grace. It's about responding to grace with extravagant love. Obedience is Jesus' love language--and so it's an extravagant and heartfelt response to what he's done for us.

    That's what Elyse was saying as well. I just couldn't hear her saying it until this morning. "Remember that the primary law is to love, and love is always responsive in nature. He loves us, therefore we love him and want to please him. Only as you remember how much he has loved you will you be motivated to love and obey in return" (Finding the Love of Jesus, pg. 128-129).

    I obey so much out of obligation and fear and anxiety. These teachings are good truths for me to hear.

    I read the Bible once a year for a while using a couple of different plans for daily devotions. Two years ago I felt in the need of breaking the routine, and have spent the time since in various study methods, study books, and BSF. But I'm starting to feel the hunger to return again, and reading Elyse's book gave me something fresh to hunt for when I start up a plan again. I want to look for Jesus and his love as I read through it. I'm so glad I read Finding the Love of Jesus From Genesis to Revelation, and I would definitely recommend it to love and know Jesus more.

    I received this book from the publisher. All opinions expressed are my own.

  • Kimberly

    I

    Finding the Love of Jesus from Genesis to Revelation by [Fitzpatrick, Elyse]I was given this book by Bethany Books in exchange for my honest review.

    I enjoy reading the Bible and this book helped to increase that joy by looking for God's Love throughout it. The author, Elyse Fitzpatrick was able to reveal God's plan through his love in the Scripture. There are chapters with questions at the end of each to help the reader open their eyes, and hearts, even more.

    I recommend this book to anyone who

    I

    Finding the Love of Jesus from Genesis to Revelation by [Fitzpatrick, Elyse]I was given this book by Bethany Books in exchange for my honest review.

    I enjoy reading the Bible and this book helped to increase that joy by looking for God's Love throughout it. The author, Elyse Fitzpatrick was able to reveal God's plan through his love in the Scripture. There are chapters with questions at the end of each to help the reader open their eyes, and hearts, even more.

    I recommend this book to anyone who desires to feel even more joy and love of God. It is a wonderful book

  • Kendra Fletcher

    I’m a fan of Elyse Fitzpatrick’s writing because without fail, she highlights Jesus Christ, front and center.

    Here, she beautifully points to the gospel over and over throughout her discussion of scripture. She makes me want to read the Bible. She reminds the reader that there isn’t anything more important than seeing the story of redemption woven from Genesis to Revelation.

    I was encouraged to approach my Bible reading with the overarching view that God is for me, and that He loves me. Sometime

    I’m a fan of Elyse Fitzpatrick’s writing because without fail, she highlights Jesus Christ, front and center.

    Here, she beautifully points to the gospel over and over throughout her discussion of scripture. She makes me want to read the Bible. She reminds the reader that there isn’t anything more important than seeing the story of redemption woven from Genesis to Revelation.

    I was encouraged to approach my Bible reading with the overarching view that God is for me, and that He loves me. Sometimes I miss that when I’m reading the law or David’s discouragement or Lamentations. But Jesus is there, too, and if you need a solid reminder, Finding the Love of Jesus may be it.

  • Rachel

    I like Elyse. But this was a little hard for me to get into. I think in a different season in the past this would have been good for me. I feel it is perfect for those who haven't yet started digging into the word and are eager to uncover treasures on their own. I'm glad I read some of it though, and can pass as a resource to younger believers as a guide to Bible study.

  • Ben

    There is quite a bit in this book about seeing Jesus in the Old Testament, and it is so good! It is a wonderful textbook and teaching tool presenting the reality that we can see the truth of the Gospel and the revelation of Jesus Christ on every page of Scripture.

    It is a great reminder, and learning experience, to read through this book. Thank you, Elyse, for your wisdom and writing and passion for this book! 

    The place where I think I picked this book up by accident is that it is seemingly writt

    There is quite a bit in this book about seeing Jesus in the Old Testament, and it is so good! It is a wonderful textbook and teaching tool presenting the reality that we can see the truth of the Gospel and the revelation of Jesus Christ on every page of Scripture.

    It is a great reminder, and learning experience, to read through this book. Thank you, Elyse, for your wisdom and writing and passion for this book! 

    The place where I think I picked this book up by accident is that it is seemingly written very intentionally to an audience of women. This confused me when I first began reading because when I read the abstract I didn't catch that it was a book written by a woman for women--I simply thought it was helping Bible readers see Jesus through all of Scripture! Again, it sort of is that. 

    I really enjoyed certain parts of the book, but it seemed as if some of the insertions speaking directly to women were out of place like there were two books combined into one. My one main critique of the book is that it felt as if I were reading two different books at the same time. I didn't connect specifically with the portions written to women, but I connected very well with the portions about finding the love of Jesus in the Old and New Testaments! 

    I would like to recommend this book to a wider audience than just women, but I wouldn't be able to without the caveat that the target audience of the author appears to be specifically women, though the content is applicable for both men and women.

  • Becky

    First sentence: Jesus loves women. He has loved us since the beginning, even from before the words "in the beginning..." were written.

    I have conflicting thoughts on Elyse Fitzpatrick's newest book, Finding the Love of Jesus From Genesis to Revelation. I do.

    On one hand, it's a book about reading the Bible. It's a book on a mission to get people excited about reading the Bible. It's a book that seeks to clarify what the Bible is all about: JESUS. It's a book that wants believers to understand the

    First sentence: Jesus loves women. He has loved us since the beginning, even from before the words "in the beginning..." were written.

    I have conflicting thoughts on Elyse Fitzpatrick's newest book, Finding the Love of Jesus From Genesis to Revelation. I do.

    On one hand, it's a book about reading the Bible. It's a book on a mission to get people excited about reading the Bible. It's a book that seeks to clarify what the Bible is all about: JESUS. It's a book that wants believers to understand the Bible and really grasp the glory of God. So how could I not appreciate that?

    But.

    On the other hand it's a book for women. Part of me totally and completely gets why there are devotionals for men and devotionals for women. Why there are certain subjects where it makes complete logical sense for books to be targeted just for men or just for women.

    But I find myself having strong feelings that reading the Bible is not one such subject. Theology should be for everyone--for men, for women, for young and old. If something is TRUE like good theology is true, then it doesn't need to have a label "for women" or "for men" applied to it.

    Bibles, bible commentaries, good and hearty theologies shouldn't have to be segregated into being "for men," or "for women." They just shouldn't. If theology is good and sound and TRUE and substantive, it shouldn't matter if it was written by a man or a woman.

    Women shouldn't only read books by women. Men shouldn't only read books by men. Women can learn from men. Men can learn from women. The truth is it doesn't matter the sex or gender of the author-preacher-teacher. What matters is if they are being led by the Holy Spirit. The same spirit leads all believers.

    Along the same lines, it also shouldn't matter if a book is new or old. Books should be judged by their contents: not their covers, not their authors.

    But. Back to the book in hand. This book wants women to feel the love of God and to see that love of God expressed fully in Christ. This expression is not limited to the four gospels. Christ Jesus is to be seen Genesis to Revelation. There is not a book of the Bible where Christ is not to be found. The whole book is about HIM. Four chapters of the book focus on seeing Jesus in the Old Testament. Jesus is to be found in the law; Jesus is to be found in 'the gospel.' I can't argue the necessity for this even if I feel it is a felt need for both men and women.

    It is written in an easygoing appealing style. It is not intimidating. It is not dry. It is engaging.

    I agree with the premise that the Bible is all about Christ. I agree that every book of the Bible has something to say about Christ. But believing this to be true does not mean that every single verse in every single book of the Bible points to Christ. Or at least every single verse points equally. For example, it is easy to see Christ in Isaiah 53, it is a lot more difficult to see him in Genesis 5. Yet each generation in the begats was one step closer to the promised Seed. Each generation could cling to the hope that one day the Savior would be born.

  • Annette

    I have mixed feelings about this book. There are things I like about it. There are things I dislike about it. In the “My Thoughts” section, I will address these.

    Summary:

    From the synopsis on the back cover of the book, Finding The Love Of Jesus has been written to encourage Bible reading: a passionate and positive attitude about Bible reading.

    The book has been written to an audience of women. Often in the Introduction, references are made to how much, “Jesus loves women.”

    Finding The Love of Jesus

    I have mixed feelings about this book. There are things I like about it. There are things I dislike about it. In the “My Thoughts” section, I will address these.

    Summary:

    From the synopsis on the back cover of the book, Finding The Love Of Jesus has been written to encourage Bible reading: a passionate and positive attitude about Bible reading.

    The book has been written to an audience of women. Often in the Introduction, references are made to how much, “Jesus loves women.”

    Finding The Love of Jesus is shown though: “the Books of Moses,” “Israel’s Stories,” “His Songs and Sayings,” the “Prophets,” “His Law,” and concludes “in the Gospel.”

    My Thoughts:

    1. I didn’t know this book was explicitly directed towards an audience of women until I read the dedication page and the intro. However, I’m okay with this. I understand why some women do not feel theology is for them and that it is a masculine field of study. Although, I did not grow up this way. My parents both read the Bible and were active in Bible studies. I remember when my dad brought home a large hardcover edition of Josephus, published by Kregel, 1981 edition. Dad was almost giddy about this book. Dad loved deep study of the Bible. He spent hours during the week studying for the Sunday Bible lesson he delivered to a couples class. He loved rich discussion about the Bible. He was unafraid to tackle hard questions. So this is the atmosphere I grew up in. Later, a wonderful female professor of Old and New Testament studies in college continued to develop my love of Bible reading and study. There are women who have been deeply hurt by men, and this is a reason why they shy away from theology (especially when taught by men.) This is a good reason for Fitzpatrick to write a book with an intended audience of women.

    I do feel Bethany House Publishers should have made the intended audience of the book clearer in the back cover synopsis and other publicity platforms about the book.

    2. A story in Luke 24 of the two people walking on the road to Emmaus, Fitzpatrick teaches the pair was a married couple. In the Luke account, the name is spelled Cleopas. In John 19:25, the name Clopas is used to refer to, “Mary the wife of Clopas.” Cleopas is the Greek form of the name. Clopas is the Aramaic form of the name. In tradition, it is believed Cleopas was Joseph’s brother (the wife of Mary the mother of Jesus). I’ve read this account plus the notes on this account in the ESV, CSB, and NIV. The NIV Faithlife Study Bible states these were two different men. “Probably a different person from Clopas, mentioned in Jn 19:25.” From page 1709. The CSB Study Bible states Cleopas was, “possibly the husband of one of the female disciples who watched Jesus die on the cross (see Jn. 19:25.) From page 1659. The ESV Crossway Study Bible does not even comment on this idea of who Cleopas really is. The Bible scholars who wrote the explanatory notes for the three Bibles do not know with certainty the person of Cleopas. Now, what threw me for a loop is the conjecture the two people on the road to Emmaus was the married couple, Cleopas and Mary. Fitzpatrick explains in brief on page 16, “Wouldn’t it make sense then to conclude that after the crucifixion, when all their hope was gone, when they were completely dishearted and bewildered, that they would decide to return home together to try and rebuild their lives after Friday’s tragic events? On page 153 in the notes section for this book, Fitzpatrick further tries to clarify her view.

    For a new Christian or a Christian who does not know Scripture, it is misleading to throw into a theology book a conjecture. Every human has their own ideas and even struggles in regards to the Bible. What is important to believe for a Christian: God’s Word is Truth.

    3. On page 29, “…we need to read the Bible the way it was meant to be read-as one big love story.” I don’t quite know what to do with this comment. It sounds pretty. I do believe God has shown through Scripture His sweeping plan to redeem mankind from Sin. I believe God is love. I believe He is merciful and gracious. It is difficult to read some of the Old Testament stories with a mindset on love. For example: Judges chapter 4, the story of Jael driving a tent peg into Sisera’s temple.

    4. At the end of the chapters is a section titled, “Open Heart, Open Hand.” In this location are questions for individual or group study. I’m glad nonfiction Christian books contain this section.

    5. Several sections I loved in the book, especially the last chapters on the Gospel. (Included is the Gospel message in the Appendix.)

    In this chapter and the next, I’m going to help you see precious truths that will enable you to understand not only what you’re reading but also how you should respond to it. As we have already learned, the Bible isn’t primarily a collection of stories about heroes we should emulate. It’s about the one Hero who draws us to love and worship him. Page 119.

    This chapter ties in all the previous chapters, plus gives the two fold purposes. These purposes are “what God expects of us” and “what God has done for us.” Fitzpatrick shows in this chapter what the OT Law said and what the Gospel fulfills. This is numero important: to understand how the NT completes the OT-Christ Jesus and His work on the cross and the resurrection.

    I am glad to have read this book even though I gave it an okay rating. It’s good, because it is a challenge to read and review a book I may not agree with. It’s good, because it pushed me to study a bit in order to make this review clear.

    This book was purchased by me.

  • Joan

    Fitzpatrick looks at the story of Jesus and the two disciples on the way to Emmaus and concludes, “All of Moses' writings, the Psalms, and the Prophets were actually about him, his suffering, his glorification.” (Loc 1654/2159) She is quite clear that the Old Testament does not merely contain references to or truths about Jesus. She writes that Jesus was saying that “everything he read,” that is, the Old Testament, was about himself. (Loc 260/2159) Fitzpatrick also reminds readers that Jesus lov

    Fitzpatrick looks at the story of Jesus and the two disciples on the way to Emmaus and concludes, “All of Moses' writings, the Psalms, and the Prophets were actually about him, his suffering, his glorification.” (Loc 1654/2159) She is quite clear that the Old Testament does not merely contain references to or truths about Jesus. She writes that Jesus was saying that “everything he read,” that is, the Old Testament, was about himself. (Loc 260/2159) Fitzpatrick also reminds readers that Jesus loves women, loves to instruct them.

    That really piqued my interest because there are some Old Testament passages that troubled me as a woman. There are OT passages that value women much below men. An example is Lev. 27:4 where the value for a man's vow is 50 shekels while a woman's is 30. Fitzpatrick had emphasized Jesus' love and honor for women so I was interested to see how these kinds of passage would be interpreted.

    But I was disappointed. Fitzpatrick picks the typical examples of Abraham, Hagar, Ruth, Esther, etc., that show gospel qualities. She doesn't choose a story like the unnamed woman in Judges 19 who died because of being abused by a mob, thanks to a Levite.

    Fitzpatrick went from assuring readers that ALL the Old Testament was about Jesus to picking out stories and passages that can be related to Jesus and His work. Rereading Luke 24:27 it seems to me that Jesus explained all the parts of the Old Testament that were about Himself, not ever claiming that the entire Old Testament was about Himself.

    Fitzpatrick brings up an interesting concept about finding Messianic fulfillment meaning in all Bible passages. She notes that reading the Old Testament this way means “we often have to hold two sometimes very different meanings in mind at the same time.” (Loc 1304/2159) She is clear that we do not ignore the original intent of the passage yet see Jesus in it too. In this way, the Proverbs 31 woman becomes a description of the bride of Christ. (Loc 1171/2159)

    I have mixed feelings about this study. I think Fitzpatrick makes way too many assumptions, like that Clopas' wife was Jesus' aunt. This is based on John 19:25 where Fitzpatrick concludes that the sister of Jesus' mother is the same as Clopas' wife. There was no punctuation in the original Greek but modern translators insert a comma, making them separate people. Fitzpatrick argues that Clopas and his wife were the two disciples on the way to Emmaus. We just don't know that.

    I would think this study would be best done in a group setting so these issues could be discussed and not just taken at face value. There are questions included for discussion or personal reflection.

    I received a complimentary egalley of this book from the publisher. My comments are an independent and honest review.

  • Susan

    "Reading this book made me want to read my Bible," said a recommendation touting "Finding the Love of Jesus from Genesis to Revelation." That was enough for me to request it to review (thanks, Bethany House!). I'm currently on a two-year plan to read through the Bible. I've done several one-year plans, and I always bog down in the Old Testament (although, true to my nature, I always soldier through). All my life I've read the Bible, mostly out of obligation. I know I should love reading it and s

    "Reading this book made me want to read my Bible," said a recommendation touting "Finding the Love of Jesus from Genesis to Revelation." That was enough for me to request it to review (thanks, Bethany House!). I'm currently on a two-year plan to read through the Bible. I've done several one-year plans, and I always bog down in the Old Testament (although, true to my nature, I always soldier through). All my life I've read the Bible, mostly out of obligation. I know I should love reading it and should want to for its own sake, and I do strive for that. Maybe this book could help.

    I have to admit that the book didn't start strongly for me. I felt like I'd encountered a bit of bait-and-switch. It opened with this dedication: "To every woman who has ever wondered whether the Son could ever love her or would want to be near her ... because, after all, she isn't a man." O--kay. Seems an odd beginning for a book about discovering Jesus in the Bible, but on we go. Author Elyse Fitzpatrick then writes in her acknowledgement that she's so grateful that she was never taught that "theology wasn't for women." She's thankful that her husband never told her that she shouldn't study and learn and love the Lord "because I was 'just a girl'." First chapter opens with how much Jesus loves women. He "loves our womanness." There's a mention of menstrual blood. On and on and on and on and if I hadn't agreed to review this one, I'd have given up.

    The author begins the first chapter by talking about the Emmaus Road story in the Bible. She mentions that Jesus was walking along with Cleopas and his wife. This stopped me because I thought I remembered hearing a sermon at church about this story. The pastor had said that we don't know who the two were who accompanied Jesus on the road. But here the author asserts that they are Cleopas and his wife, and further, that the wife is Jesus' aunt. I did some online searching, and while some authors and scholars infer that these are the two on the road with Jesus, I don't see much Biblical support for that assumption. It seems a bit of a stretch to just assume that this is correct, and moreover to use it as an example of Jesus loving women.

    After reading this far, I began thinking about Jesus and women. Maybe I'm just blessed with simple faith or naivete, but I've never struggled with thinking Jesus *didn't* love women. I've never felt lesser as a woman (or as a girl). Is this really so unusual? All these current marches by women, etc. etc. etc. -- it just seems like a battle I see no need for. Even as a young child, I saw girls (including myself) as every bit as smart as (often smarter than) boys. I'm just not sure where all this insecurity on the part of women is coming from. As I said, maybe I'm unusual in feeling this way. Regardless, I'm very grateful that I feel secure in God's love for women. It must feel really bad to doubt that, and I say that sincerely.

    Regarding this book, I'm sorry for any man who might pick it up to read. It seems like bad PR on the book's part that it's heavily geared toward women, yet this is alluded to nowhere on the front or back covers.

    The rest of the book consists of chapters detailing the various books of the Bible (prophets, songs and sayings, gospels, etc), along with methods of looking for Jesus in each type of book. This was fine, but sadly there wasn't as much meat as I was looking for. Perhaps it's because I've been in church and Bible studies all my life, but the suggestions here were all things that seemed simplistic or were familiar to me already. Fitzpatrick tells us to recognize Old Testament mentions of the "angel of the Lord" as examples of the preincarnate Christ. She writes about looking for examples of Jesus in books of prophecy. Good points, but again -- is this anything new?

    Many suggestions in the book seemed to me to be more the author's interpretations than as hard-and-fast truth. For instance, she cautions us several times to view Biblical stories as inducements to worship Jesus, rather than as examples for us to follow. She suggests that we look at the Jonah story as a picture of the Gospels rather than as an example or "morality tale." Couldn't it be both?

    Are you getting the idea that this book wasn't a winner for me? Sadly, it's true.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.