When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing

When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing

Everyone knows that timing is everything. But we don't know much about timing itself. Our lives are a never-ending stream of "when" decisions: when to start a business, schedule a class, get serious about a person. Yet we make those decisions based on intuition and guesswork.Timing, it's often assumed, is an art. In When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing, Pink show...

DownloadRead Online
Title:When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing
Author:Daniel H. Pink
Rating:
Edition Language:English

When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing Reviews

  • Christopher Lawson

    In WHEN: THE SCIENTIFIC SECRETS OF PERFECT TIMING, author Daniel Pink shares scientific, surprising findings that have serious consequences. Did you know, for instance, that the timing of your surgery is important? Studies show that far more mistakes are made later in the day, so be sure to get a morning appointment! Similarly, if you are in court, the disposition of the judge is a lot more lenient in the morning.

    To work the most efficiently, it's important to figure out your own cycle of effect

    In WHEN: THE SCIENTIFIC SECRETS OF PERFECT TIMING, author Daniel Pink shares scientific, surprising findings that have serious consequences. Did you know, for instance, that the timing of your surgery is important? Studies show that far more mistakes are made later in the day, so be sure to get a morning appointment! Similarly, if you are in court, the disposition of the judge is a lot more lenient in the morning.

    To work the most efficiently, it's important to figure out your own cycle of effectiveness--what the author calls "Waves of the Day." Each day, our disposition traverses three stages--a peak, a trough, and a recovery. So try to tailor your activities to match the best time for that type of task. For instance, most people do analytical tasks better in the morning, and more insightful tasks in the evening. The worst time to tackle serious problems is in the afternoon--that's the "trough" time. That period is your least effective time and "good for very little." Use that time to do trivial things like checking e-mail.

    The author provides a simple way to figure out if you are a "Lark" (early bird) or "Owl" (late riser). The cycles are different for each chronotype. Also, not all places are equally good for both types. For example, school schedules, with classes beginning early, are setup to favor the "larks," or early-risers. This is unfortunate, since many teens are at their best much later in the day.

    Here's something really scary: A study of parole judges showed a significant difference in their rulings, based on the time of day. If your hearing was scheduled in the afternoon, you had almost zero chance of winning a parole. However, if the judges took an afternoon break, their disposition drastically changed, and parole was far more likely.

    The author emphasizes the importance of "restorative breaks." These are especially important in countering the low time of the trough. Just a ten-minute break, such as a nature walk, can have an enormous impact. For school kids, taking a break is especially important. One Danish study showed that if students took a 20 minute break before a test, their scores were substantially higher.

    Restorative breaks should ideally be outside, with nature, and away from work. It's best to be moving, and with others: "Consider a short walk outside with a friend during which you discuss something other than work."

    When you start a task has a lasting effect on our attitude and our success. The author cites statistics showing the career path of graduates based on when they first started their career: "Beginnings stay with us far longer than we know; their effects linger to the end."

    So, starting anew, or a "fresh start" helps us recover from a false start. There are many ways and times to do the reset. In the section, "Eighty-Six Days in the Year when you can Make a Fresh Start" the author provides suggestions for starting anew. You can re-start on the first of the month, for example, or on an anniversary.

    I found the "Science of Endings" particularly intriguing. Research shows that we tend to remember events based on how they end. So, we can decide to change the ending to make it more positive and memorable: "If we're conscious of the power of closing moments and our ability to shape them, we can craft more memorable and meaningful endings in many realms of life. . .

    For example, if you are on vacation, plan a great close: "You'll enjoy the vacation more, both in the moment and in retrospect, if you consciously create an elevating final experience."

    The same priniciple applies at work--end your workday on a positive note. One easy trick is to take a few minutes to jot down your accomplishments for the day. This step of "recording what you've achieved can encode the entire day more positively." Ending the day with a moment of gratitude is another easy trick, and is a "powerful restorative." (Note: The author includes a surprising item of generiosity in the book itself. I hope you find it!)

    So all in all, I found WHEN to be a fascinating, fun read. The author is a witty writer, who brings a lot of humor to the subject. His experience as a speech-writer is evident in the quality of the writing. I enjoyed reading about the various studies that illustrated peak times and low times. The statistics showing the correlation of medical mistakes to the time of day was especially alarming. Perhaps the most alarming research was the study showing how parole board judges were stricter later in the day. If I ever have to appear before a parole board, I'm definitely asking the judges to first take a restorative break.

  • Christine Nolfi

    Fabulous tips on how to increase productivity by making subtle changes to your work routine. Highly recommended for any woman crawling through the afternoon energy slump by consuming too much sugar and caffeine. Highly recommended!

  • Marianne

    4.5★s

    When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing is the fourth book by bestselling American author, Daniel H. Pink. If we’re making an important life decision, what we decide obviously requires careful consideration. But what about when we decide? Could the time of day that we make a decision be significant? Could the time of day affect how well we learn or do our work? Does it really matter when we have that first cup of coffee? According to Dan Pink, it definitely does.

    In this intriguing bo

    4.5★s

    When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing is the fourth book by bestselling American author, Daniel H. Pink. If we’re making an important life decision, what we decide obviously requires careful consideration. But what about when we decide? Could the time of day that we make a decision be significant? Could the time of day affect how well we learn or do our work? Does it really matter when we have that first cup of coffee? According to Dan Pink, it definitely does.

    In this intriguing book, Pink examines the importance of good and bad timing. He begins by explaining how our individual chronotype (easily established) determines both our mood and our ability to perform at any given time of the day: how it affects our professional and our ethical judgements, as well as our physical function.

    But he doesn’t just pontificate on the best time to do something for future success and happiness. He acknowledges that not everyone can control their work environment or the financial climate as they enter the job market. Pink also gives practical suggestions for dealing with less than ideal conditions, as well as hints and tips to improve everyday life.

    Pink supports his points with data and simple, clear graphs. The depth of his research is apparent in every paragraph, and supported by his extremely comprehensive (26-page) notes section detailing references for each chapter. As well as six suggestions for further reading, Pink includes an 8-page index. But the most useful thing about this book is his Time Hacker’s Handbook: salient points from each section are condensed into summaries full of hints and tips and practical exercises that appear after each of the first six chapters.

    Pink explains in detail: why having a coffee before a power nap makes sense; why combining a lunch break with an education session at 1pm (as some teaching hospitals do with their Grand Rounds) is counterproductive (ditto 8am lectures for University students); when the worst time to be a hospital patient is, and why; and the reason some people have the so-called “mid-life crisis”.

    He looks at the effects of starting one’s career during a depressed jobs-market; why a mid-point (in a project, in a career, in a life) can cause a slump or a spark; how to overcome a bad start; when to quit your job; when to get married; when to exercise; the importance of breaks; and much, much more. Illustrating his points are choirs and rowing teams and basketballers and dubbawalas delivering tiffin tins and Hanukkah candles and the captain of the Lusitania.

    Pink’s fourth book should be compulsory reading for bosses, educators, and schedulers, for policymakers, company executives, and performers, but there is plenty in this fascinating book that the average person will find applicable to their lives. This is a quick read that rewards time spent with some excellent insights. Recommended!

  • Brandice

    I really liked

    by Daniel Pink. The book was interesting. I was into it from the get-go but the last chapter was probably my favorite - thinking in terms of tenses.

    The book discusses the factor of time, in many facets of life: The impact of one decision and the timing in which you arrived at that decision. It discusses (among other things) the hidden pattern of every day life, beginnings, midpoints, and ends, synching and belonging, and thinking in

    I really liked

    by Daniel Pink. The book was interesting. I was into it from the get-go but the last chapter was probably my favorite - thinking in terms of tenses.

    The book discusses the factor of time, in many facets of life: The impact of one decision and the timing in which you arrived at that decision. It discusses (among other things) the hidden pattern of every day life, beginnings, midpoints, and ends, synching and belonging, and thinking in tenses. There are also interesting studies to support the points made - for example, it’s better to have surgery in the morning than the afternoon (studies show significantly less mistakes are made in the morning). There’s something to be learned for everyone here.

    Daniel Pink is, and has been, for many years, my favorite non-fiction author. He does a great job describing social studies and uncovering results and tips that can help people be better - at work and in life. His books are comprehendible but more importantly, really interesting - at least they always have been to me. He’s speaking at a local event about

    that I look forward to attending soon!

  • Bookworm LLC

    “When” is destined to become required reading for all college students regardless of major. Daniel H. Pink shines the stage lights on Perfect timing, bringing it out of the shadows of mystic good ol’ fashioned luck and showcasing it as a learnable, teachable and accomplishable part of the show of life. This may have been the first time I read about studies and laughed. Mr. Pink’s humor and chapter summations kept me going at just the right time.

  • Jim Razinha

    I read Dan Pink's

    before I read his

    , which was a better order because Drive was better written and had a more accurate message than Mind. Okay, a message that resonated better.

    is as good as

    , if not as much a paradigm shifter. But it is still a

    prompter.

    Dan Pink writes an easy read...he's really good at it.

    is excellent. And, as with Drive, he's very good at summarizing the extensive research he's done on this book - which he provides in his end note

    I read Dan Pink's

    before I read his

    , which was a better order because Drive was better written and had a more accurate message than Mind. Okay, a message that resonated better.

    is as good as

    , if not as much a paradigm shifter. But it is still a

    prompter.

    Dan Pink writes an easy read...he's really good at it.

    is excellent. And, as with Drive, he's very good at summarizing the extensive research he's done on this book - which he provides in his end notes, and encourages his readers to read and check his conclusions. (Some authors don't even provide references...Bill O'Reilly, take note...) Pink looks at timing patterns of the day, associated with beginnings, middles, and endings, and synchronization.

    There's a lot more behind what he presents. Yet, what he presents...well, I'm a rather informed person but I learn stuff every day...at least I try.

    may have shifted my paradigms, but

    taught me some physiological and behavioral changes that I might just want to make. How did I not know that caffeine disrupted the natural cortisol production of my body? And that I needed to delay my morning extra jolt?

    Things I do naturally seem to be right according to what Pink shares. Detachment is supposed to be critical - I'm paraphrasing, but...check out and you'll actually check in.

    focusing on something else might just help you actually focus on the task that needs your focus.

    Time is obviously the focus of Pink's work here, and he talks about short and long term timelines, significance of milestones (holidays, just before decades of life, just after say...New Year's Day...), taking stock of time in general... A point that emphasizes living in the present is [researchers]

    Yes...our perception changes...I've experienced it. Walking through the redwoods or sequoias...time seems to slow.

    Lots here, and hidden behind here... worth a read, and maybe a reread read or two. Pink's books have that quality.

  • kartik narayanan

    Read the full review at my blog

    When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing is written by Daniel Pink, famed author of books like Drive, A Whole New Mind, To Sell is Human etc.

    Daniel Pink talks about the importance of timing in this book. According to him, Timing is an emerging science and he explores this science further in ‘When’. Some of the themes he covers in this bo

    Read the full review at my blog

    When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing is written by Daniel Pink, famed author of books like Drive, A Whole New Mind, To Sell is Human etc.

    Daniel Pink talks about the importance of timing in this book. According to him, Timing is an emerging science and he explores this science further in ‘When’. Some of the themes he covers in this book include when to change careers, deliver bad news, schedule a class, end a marriage, go for a run, or get serious about a project or a person.

    When is a relatively short book with 7 chapters spread across three sections.

    The first section covers diurnal patterns i.e. how to arrange our daily life, when to drink coffee, the benefits of micro naps etc. The second section covers long terms patterns – how do we start habits, how we are influenced by beginnings and endings, how to deal with mid-life crises etc. The last section covers how to get into harmony with timings.

    Each chapter is also followed by a time hacking section which has practical advice on timing.

    Read the full review at my blog

  • UB

    I picked this up because lately, I can’t shake a sense of panic about time slipping through my fingers (babies becoming biggies will do that, so too will turning 39 in a few weeks, which the author spends some time talking about - “the nines” and how they approach life). No big surprises in this book but a quick and fun read nonetheless. Also, So. Much. Stanford. But I love that place, so...

  • Text Publishing

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.