Noir

Noir

San Francisco. Summer, 1947. A dame walks into a saloon . . .It’s not every afternoon that an enigmatic, comely blonde named Stilton (like the cheese) walks into the scruffy gin joint where Sammy "Two Toes" Tiffin tends bar. It’s love at first sight, but before Sammy can make his move, an Air Force general named Remy arrives with some urgent business. ’Cause when you need...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Noir
Author:Christopher Moore
Rating:

Noir Reviews

  • Lindsey

    A new favorite from Christopher Moore! NOIR perfectly balanced sweet characters, film noir style and lingo, and Moore's trademark humor. In short, I loved it. It may actually be in my top 5 favorite Chris Moore books.

    Sammy is a bartender who plans a get rich quick scheme that doesn't take long to go horribly awry. While he's trying to clean up the mess, he is also wooing a dame that entered his life named Stilton (aka The Cheese), and avoiding the "men in black" who are searching for the myster

    A new favorite from Christopher Moore! NOIR perfectly balanced sweet characters, film noir style and lingo, and Moore's trademark humor. In short, I loved it. It may actually be in my top 5 favorite Chris Moore books.

    Sammy is a bartender who plans a get rich quick scheme that doesn't take long to go horribly awry. While he's trying to clean up the mess, he is also wooing a dame that entered his life named Stilton (aka The Cheese), and avoiding the "men in black" who are searching for the mysterious "subject."

    I fell in love with nearly all the characters in this book. I loved how The Cheese was a strong female character, and how Sammy was a (not quite so innocent) bartender thrown into a weird and dangerous situation. It was a bit of a mystery, and I didn't always know where it was going in the best way.

    I also really appreciated the afterward, where Moore explains his inspirations behind characters and locations.

  • Joseph Carano

    I won a advance readers edition of this novel on the Goodreads site. I enjoyed this offering in just about any way a reader can. The characters were original and interesting as was the strange and very original plot. The style of writing, the prose in the equation, was also very original. Moore seemed to be trying to write in a late 1940's style. I do not know if he succeeded or not but I enjoyed the effort. All in all, a very enjoyable and comedic writing which I would highly recommend.

  • Rich Tremblay

    I am an avid Christopher Moore fan and was very excited to win a copy of the Advance Reader Edition of Noir from Goodreads. Having read the synopsis of the book, I was curious to see how this book would compare to the other books that he'd written. Generally I liked the premise of the book, the characters and Moore's interpretation of the "film noir" genre.

    This book is written in a style very much different from his usual writing and I think he effectively portrayed the "feel" of the time perio

    I am an avid Christopher Moore fan and was very excited to win a copy of the Advance Reader Edition of Noir from Goodreads. Having read the synopsis of the book, I was curious to see how this book would compare to the other books that he'd written. Generally I liked the premise of the book, the characters and Moore's interpretation of the "film noir" genre.

    This book is written in a style very much different from his usual writing and I think he effectively portrayed the "feel" of the time period, but it seems like the author dialed back his characters' personalities, and as a result the "action" seems more muted. In some ways, this book reminded me of Fluke - an enjoyable read, but not the exhilarating read I've come to expect from Moore. I would also expect that's exactly what he intended.

  • Art

    Here's the Rorschach test whether you will like this book. Chris Moore begins one of the chapters of Noir thusly: "The fog lay spread across the city like a drowned whore -- damp, cold, smelling of salt and diesel -- a sea-sodden streetwalker who'd just bonked a tugboat..." If you are offended by the quote, then never mind reading the book. On the other hand, if you see the playful tweaking of the noir genre then by all means continue on.

    With its fog and alley ways, San Francisco is the perfect

    Here's the Rorschach test whether you will like this book. Chris Moore begins one of the chapters of Noir thusly: "The fog lay spread across the city like a drowned whore -- damp, cold, smelling of salt and diesel -- a sea-sodden streetwalker who'd just bonked a tugboat..." If you are offended by the quote, then never mind reading the book. On the other hand, if you see the playful tweaking of the noir genre then by all means continue on.

    With its fog and alley ways, San Francisco is the perfect place for a noir novel, even if this one has more aspects of "playful noir" than the real thing that Dashiell Hammett might write. The Maltese Falcon, after all, was also set in San Francisco. Moore takes us to San Francisco in 1947, just a few years after the Maltese Falcon movie, and the same year It's A Wonderful Life came out.

    You get all of the standard noir features -- semi-innocent guys caught up in weird plots, dames, gats, murders, sketchy bars, waterfronts, all presented faithfully to the time and place, not reinterpreted for the political sensibilities of 2018.. You also get the Chris Moore touches -- oddball customs, sentient animals, strange beings. Sometimes they mix well. Sometimes they feel sort of thrown willy-nilly into the mix.

    It's still a fun trip, so come on in, the fog is fine.

  • Megan

    I was delighted to find out that I won a FirstReads copy of this one; it arrived just two days after being notified of my win. While I haven't read much by the author previously, I'm familiar with his work thanks to my brother, who's a huge fan. A noir with Christopher Moore twists sounded like it would be a hoot, and I knew that I would not be disappointed from the very first sentence. It was the perfect escape from frigid temps and a fun way to start the 2018 reading year. The writing style is

    I was delighted to find out that I won a FirstReads copy of this one; it arrived just two days after being notified of my win. While I haven't read much by the author previously, I'm familiar with his work thanks to my brother, who's a huge fan. A noir with Christopher Moore twists sounded like it would be a hoot, and I knew that I would not be disappointed from the very first sentence. It was the perfect escape from frigid temps and a fun way to start the 2018 reading year. The writing style is reminiscent of a classic noir sprinkled with Moore's signature humor and playful use of language. Many times, I found myself reading along and then sputtering aloud thanks to the clever turns of phrase. The story is told from multiple perspectives, sometimes shifting from first person to third within the same chapter; the identity of one of the narrators isn't revealed until fairly far into the story, which made for a fun guessing game about who the omniscient narrator might be. I enjoyed all of the characters and the interplay between them immensely.

    Set in the mean streets of San Francisco in 1947, a bartender named Sammy "Two Toes" Tiffin finds his boss's body on the floor of the stockroom to Sal's Saloon. Like any good noir offering, the story starts not when the body is found, but when a comely blonde named Stilton (yes, like the Cheese, which is how she's referred to by Sammy) wanders into Sal's Saloon and Sammy is instantly smitten. Before he can express his undying devotion, an Air Force general arrives with some urgent business; Sammy's street connections are just what he needs. When one of Sammy's schemes goes south and the Cheese disappears, a madcap series of events unfolds as Sammy tries to find the Cheese and he stumbles into a mysterious conspiracy. Sammy's background and relationships with a couple of the secondary characters are revealed in flashbacks as the story proceeds.

    Like the writing style, the cover art harkens back to classic noirs; the first page of each chapter has an image from the cover. The author included an Afterword that explains the setting, the neighborhoods, the characters, and the decision to write a noir. I felt that the elements of a classic noir were all present, even if told in a little more tongue-in-cheek way, and the novel still felt like an authentic Moore piece. While he originally intended to write a dark streets/desperate noir, Moore states in the Afterword that he ended up writing a "Perky Noir." I can't think of a better description for this one and am so very grateful to have had a chance to read an Advanced Reader's Edition thanks to the FirstReads giveaway.

  • Peter

    I received a free copy of this book from the Goodreads Giveaway program.

    Christopher Moore states in the afterword to his novel, Noir, that he started writing noir as the story of a poor, hapless working mug who gets roped into some nefarious goings on by a dame. He then explains that he ended up with something a lot closer to Damon Runyon meets Bugs Bunny. He accurately describes the novel and your reaction to it will depend upon whether you like screwball or madcap comedy mixed with Runyonesque

    I received a free copy of this book from the Goodreads Giveaway program.

    Christopher Moore states in the afterword to his novel, Noir, that he started writing noir as the story of a poor, hapless working mug who gets roped into some nefarious goings on by a dame. He then explains that he ended up with something a lot closer to Damon Runyon meets Bugs Bunny. He accurately describes the novel and your reaction to it will depend upon whether you like screwball or madcap comedy mixed with Runyonesque dialogue.

    The story centers on Sammy Tiffin, a bartender, who falls for a blonde named Stilton (like the cheese), when she enters his bar. Between Sammy's get rich quick scheme in Chinatown and Stilton's attempt to earn quick cash at a retreat of rich and powerful San Francisco men. there are plenty of comical plot twists that eventually involve Area 51 and some "men in black."

    Moore notes in his afterword that the novel is based on certain true events and the certain characters and locations in San Francisco also are derived from actual persons or places.

  • Beth

    I enjoyed this book - it was a fun romp, though I didn't tend to find it as LOL funny as some of his other books (Lamb being my favorite). Men in Black, aliens, Dames, poisonous snakes...the list goes on and on with crazy characters all thrown together that somehow work. Thus is the Magic of Moore ;)

  • Kitten Kisser

    What Happened To The Author Guy?

    I'm always excited when a new book by Christopher Moore comes out & this time was no exception. The first 90 pages or so I kept nodding off. So boring. So very very boring. What gives? This is Christopher Moore! This is the guy that makes me laugh & not want to stop reading. The guy who's books I not only re-read but also listen to over & over on audible. Sadly, this is not a book I'm likely to read again or purchase on Audible. The Moore I know &

    What Happened To The Author Guy?

    I'm always excited when a new book by Christopher Moore comes out & this time was no exception. The first 90 pages or so I kept nodding off. So boring. So very very boring. What gives? This is Christopher Moore! This is the guy that makes me laugh & not want to stop reading. The guy who's books I not only re-read but also listen to over & over on audible. Sadly, this is not a book I'm likely to read again or purchase on Audible. The Moore I know & love makes an appearance here & there, but for the most part I didn't even feel like I was reading a book by The Author Guy. The story line sounds outrageous & should be wildly entertaining, but it just isn't. I don't understand how a book with such a wild cast of characters could be such a dud. As it went on it did become more interesting, meaning I didn't nod off as much, but yes, I still did start to doze; my neck likes this book even less than me.

    I would have rated this even lower if not for the Afterword. Reading Moore's ideas & research for his novel actually made me feel like a turd for not liking the Author Guys book. Hopefully his next book is more Moore & less bore.

  • Erikka

    Every author is allowed one meh book. This is definitely Moore's. I am usually enamored of his work. Amazing characters, enticing plot lines, piss-yourself-laughing humor. Those were all missing from this. I feel like it was two separate stories: a valiant attempt at noir writing that fell short of its goal, and a weird sci-fi alien line that didn't seem to have a goal to fall short of. Everything just seemed flimsily pieced together with no real driving character to keep me interested. The side

    Every author is allowed one meh book. This is definitely Moore's. I am usually enamored of his work. Amazing characters, enticing plot lines, piss-yourself-laughing humor. Those were all missing from this. I feel like it was two separate stories: a valiant attempt at noir writing that fell short of its goal, and a weird sci-fi alien line that didn't seem to have a goal to fall short of. Everything just seemed flimsily pieced together with no real driving character to keep me interested. The side characters were the most traditionally Moore-ian. Lone Jones, Moo-Shoes, and Myrtle and Jimmy were more intriguing and funnier than our MCs, Sammy and Stilton. My husband and I read all of Moore's books together--he gave up with this one at about 20%. I was really disappointed.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.