Noir

Noir

San Francisco. Summer, 1947. A dame walks into a saloon . . .It’s not every afternoon that an enigmatic, comely blonde named Stilton (like the cheese) walks into the scruffy gin joint where Sammy "Two Toes" Tiffin tends bar. It’s love at first sight, but before Sammy can make his move, an Air Force general named Remy arrives with some urgent business. ’Cause when you need...

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Title:Noir
Author:Christopher Moore
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Noir Reviews

  • Stacy Fetters

    Christoper Moore is like a fine wine, he gets better as time goes on. He’s one of those authors that never disappoints and this book is now in my top three favorites of his.

    At first, you aren’t sure if this is an actual Moore novel until you get to those off the wall jokes. They are edgy, wacky, and absolutely hilarious. It’s a tad bit different than what Moore fans are used t

    Christoper Moore is like a fine wine, he gets better as time goes on. He’s one of those authors that never disappoints and this book is now in my top three favorites of his.

    At first, you aren’t sure if this is an actual Moore novel until you get to those off the wall jokes. They are edgy, wacky, and absolutely hilarious. It’s a tad bit different than what Moore fans are used to but it still keeps you entertained from cover to cover.

    I'm glad to see that Moore can still try to shock us in the most pleasant ways. He's definitely one of those authors that can get you out of any funk.

    Old and new fans of Moore will be jumping for joy and scream in terror as the snake makes his grand appearance. Just remember this book has bite ;)

  • Lindsey

    A new favorite from Christopher Moore! NOIR perfectly balanced sweet characters, film noir style and lingo, and Moore's trademark humor. In short, I loved it. It may actually be in my top 5 favorite Chris Moore books.

    Sammy is a bartender who plans a get rich quick scheme that doesn't take long to go horribly awry. While he's trying to clean up the mess, he is also wooing a dame that entered his life named Stilton (aka The Cheese), and avoiding the "men in black" who are searching for the myster

    A new favorite from Christopher Moore! NOIR perfectly balanced sweet characters, film noir style and lingo, and Moore's trademark humor. In short, I loved it. It may actually be in my top 5 favorite Chris Moore books.

    Sammy is a bartender who plans a get rich quick scheme that doesn't take long to go horribly awry. While he's trying to clean up the mess, he is also wooing a dame that entered his life named Stilton (aka The Cheese), and avoiding the "men in black" who are searching for the mysterious "subject."

    I fell in love with nearly all the characters in this book. I loved how The Cheese was a strong female character, and how Sammy was a (not quite so innocent) bartender thrown into a weird and dangerous situation. It was a bit of a mystery, and I didn't always know where it was going in the best way.

    I also really appreciated the afterward, where Moore explains his inspirations behind characters and locations.

  • John of Canada

    As well as being a dandy mystery novel,Noir features diversity at it's most compelling.There are blacks,Chinese,Japanese,Poles,Italians,women,Germans who can't say squirrel,drag queens,lesbians,poets,Catholics,cripples,aliens,a bratty kid,exploding cows,men in black,a talking snake,and Donald Trump!Okay,I made up the Donald Trump part.

    This takes place in San Francisco,post WW2.Christopher Moore includes an afterword where he explains the setting,and his history is very interesting.I was awestruc

    As well as being a dandy mystery novel,Noir features diversity at it's most compelling.There are blacks,Chinese,Japanese,Poles,Italians,women,Germans who can't say squirrel,drag queens,lesbians,poets,Catholics,cripples,aliens,a bratty kid,exploding cows,men in black,a talking snake,and Donald Trump!Okay,I made up the Donald Trump part.

    This takes place in San Francisco,post WW2.Christopher Moore includes an afterword where he explains the setting,and his history is very interesting.I was awestruck by how well he worked in one weird twist after another.It was also the funniest book I have read in a loooong time.

    If they ever make a movie of this they should get Humphrey Bogart to do the voiceover.Oh wait.He's dead.Never mind.They should do a documentary of how Moore fitted all the pieces together.Now I have to read some more of his books.

  • Mogsy (MMOGC)

    3.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum

    Noir was my first experience with the writing of humorist Christopher Moore, and I was not disappointed. In fact, it’s been a few days since I finished reading the book, and every now and then I still catch myself chuckling at the memory of some of the wild and whacky things that happened in it. Although I’m unable to comment on the way this novel compares with the author’s other work (I’ve come across some reviews from

    3.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum

    Noir was my first experience with the writing of humorist Christopher Moore, and I was not disappointed. In fact, it’s been a few days since I finished reading the book, and every now and then I still catch myself chuckling at the memory of some of the wild and whacky things that happened in it. Although I’m unable to comment on the way this novel compares with the author’s other work (I’ve come across some reviews from longtime fans that mention that it feels different), l can nonetheless understand why many readers find his stories entertaining.

    The book opens in San Francisco, 1947. Protagonist Sammy “Two Toes” Tiffin is working as a bartender at Sal’s Saloon, when a beautiful blonde named Stilton (like “the Cheese”, which is henceforth how she will be known to Sammy) breezes in through the door and captures his heart. However, the romance will have to wait, because soon afterwards, Sammy’s boss puts him in contact with an Air Force general who desperately needs his help. Certain “goods and services” are required at an upcoming function being held at the Bohemian Club, and Sammy, with his street smarts and connections, is in the perfect position to make it all happen.

    But then, the Cheese disappears, and Sammy grows worried. More troubles also begin mounting as some of his other harebrained schemes proceed to spiral out of control, resulting in poisonous vipers, dead bodies, and the arrival of black-suited government men bedecked in dark sunglasses. Subsequently, when Sammy sets out on his search for the Cheese, he inadvertently stumbles into a loony conspiracy involving a mysterious flying object spotted over Mount Rainer, topped off by an unexplained plane crash in the desert near a town called Roswell, New Mexico.

    Part satire and part homage, this novel feels like a zany, breathless love letter to the noir genre. Its influence can be seen everything, from the cover to the dialogue, attitudes, and mannerisms of the characters. It’s a bit like being transported straight into a 1950s classic noir film, with the tone and style of the writing giving the story’s post-war San Francisco an authentic flavor. Moore also provides fascinating commentary on the inspiration for his setting, as well as some of his experiences and the research he did into the culture, history, and environment of the city’s vibrant Chinatown.

    That being said, Noir also has the feel of a tongue-in-cheek satire, which apparently is something of a specialty for the author. Certain elements are done in an over-the-top way to emphasize or poke fun at some of the genre’s more distinctive features, including larger-than-life heroes and coquettish femme fatales. As a result, rather than dark and tense, the atmosphere has been replaced by an eccentric, madcap energy that pervades the whole book, so that you have whacky things like chapters written from the perspective of an all-knowing snake, space aliens being smuggled away in rumble seats in the dead of night, and sexy beautiful women with nicknames like “the Cheese”. Noir is not really “noir” as such, in that it doesn’t really fit the style or the tone of the genre, and yet, the overall mood is still very much there, featuring a strong undercurrent of conflict and despondency in spite of some of the sillier themes.

    At the end of the day, I suppose what really matters is that I enjoyed it. I enjoyed it a lot. Humor being such a subjective beast, I wasn’t sure if my tastes would mesh well with Christopher Moore’s style, but it appears I no longer have to be concerned on that front. If it means getting more of the same laughs and cleverness I found in Noir, I’m definitely on board to read more of the author’s work.

    Audiobook Comments: Johnny Heller has a voice well-suited to a book like this. The gruff raspiness of it might be jarring in any other story, but it turned out to be a good match for a lot of the characters in Noir, especially for Sammy, a slick and somewhat jaded protagonist with a lot of shady connections. More importantly, the humor also comes out in Heller’s performance, as he delivers the satire and lines of snappy dialogue with instinctual timing and flair.

  • Robert

    I’ll start by saying I enjoyed this book from beginning to end.

    That being said, the first half didn’t have the feel of a Christopher Moore novel. Fans will know what I mean. It was good, but not Lamb, good.

    Now halfway through something happens. Something delicious and crazy and perfectly Squirrel People. And from that point on, it is most definitely a Christopher Moore book.

    The man has yet to fail me. And Lamb still holds top spot for best book of all time.

  • Art

    Here's the Rorschach test whether you will like this book. Chris Moore begins one of the chapters of Noir thusly: "The fog lay spread across the city like a drowned whore -- damp, cold, smelling of salt and diesel -- a sea-sodden streetwalker who'd just bonked a tugboat..." If you are offended by the quote, then never mind reading the book. On the other hand, if you see the playful tweaking of the noir genre then by all means continue on.

    With its fog and alley ways, San Francisco is the perfect

    Here's the Rorschach test whether you will like this book. Chris Moore begins one of the chapters of Noir thusly: "The fog lay spread across the city like a drowned whore -- damp, cold, smelling of salt and diesel -- a sea-sodden streetwalker who'd just bonked a tugboat..." If you are offended by the quote, then never mind reading the book. On the other hand, if you see the playful tweaking of the noir genre then by all means continue on.

    With its fog and alley ways, San Francisco is the perfect place for a noir novel, even if this one has more aspects of "playful noir" than the real thing that Dashiell Hammett might write. The Maltese Falcon, after all, was also set in San Francisco. Moore takes us to San Francisco in 1947, just a few years after the Maltese Falcon movie, and the same year It's A Wonderful Life came out.

    You get all of the standard noir features -- semi-innocent guys caught up in weird plots, dames, gats, murders, sketchy bars, waterfronts, all presented faithfully to the time and place, not reinterpreted for the political sensibilities of 2018.. You also get the Chris Moore touches -- oddball customs, sentient animals, strange beings. Sometimes they mix well. Sometimes they feel sort of thrown willy-nilly into the mix.

    It's still a fun trip, so come on in, the fog is fine.

  • Nicole D.

    This isn't a totally trademark Christopher Moore book, but you know what? I'm totally OK with that. People evolve and frankly I didn't want to read a formulaic novel.

    I struggled a bit at first - I think Moore was working on creating the Noir feel and it just felt like a lot of words going nowhere. But I'm a fan and I knew that it couldn't be that far off the mark, so I needed to persevere. What came next was maybe a little sophisticated that we perhaps expect.

    San Francisco 1947. Your ragtag bu

    This isn't a totally trademark Christopher Moore book, but you know what? I'm totally OK with that. People evolve and frankly I didn't want to read a formulaic novel.

    I struggled a bit at first - I think Moore was working on creating the Noir feel and it just felt like a lot of words going nowhere. But I'm a fan and I knew that it couldn't be that far off the mark, so I needed to persevere. What came next was maybe a little sophisticated that we perhaps expect.

    San Francisco 1947. Your ragtag bunch of misfits get caught up in something which would be too much to handle for most. Using their street smarts they slither from one trouble to the next yet manage to overcome. The characters are great (typically Moore) and at the center of story is the relationship between Two Toes and the Cheese, which I absolutely loved. I don't know what it was about those two together, but for me it was magic.

    The only disappointment for me was the lack of laugh out loud moments. It's humorous but definitely more subdued.

    San Francisco is often featured prominently in Moore novels, and this (for me) was a new and fresh look at the City. In the afterword he gives us a glimpse into the process of writing this book and into the people and places who influenced him. I loved that. It made the reading of the book more special.

    I enjoyed it.

  • Billie

    Falling into a kind of weird "meh"-ness between the madcap antics of most of Moore's San Francisco novels and the smart hilarity of

    and

    , this just never quite gelled for me as a reader. It got considerably more engaging in the second half, but that was just too late for me to fall in love with it. I liked it, but it's not going to be a full-blown, long-term love affair.

  • Erikka

    Every author is allowed one meh book. This is definitely Moore's. I am usually enamored of his work. Amazing characters, enticing plot lines, piss-yourself-laughing humor. Those were all missing from this. I feel like it was two separate stories: a valiant attempt at noir writing that fell short of its goal, and a weird sci-fi alien line that didn't seem to have a goal to fall short of. Everything just seemed flimsily pieced together with no real driving character to keep me interested. The side

    Every author is allowed one meh book. This is definitely Moore's. I am usually enamored of his work. Amazing characters, enticing plot lines, piss-yourself-laughing humor. Those were all missing from this. I feel like it was two separate stories: a valiant attempt at noir writing that fell short of its goal, and a weird sci-fi alien line that didn't seem to have a goal to fall short of. Everything just seemed flimsily pieced together with no real driving character to keep me interested. The side characters were the most traditionally Moore-ian. Lone Jones, Moo-Shoes, and Myrtle and Jimmy were more intriguing and funnier than our MCs, Sammy and Stilton. My husband and I read all of Moore's books together--he gave up with this one at about 20%. I was really disappointed.

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