Burn Bright

Burn Bright

They are the wild and the broken. The werewolves too damaged to live safely among their own kind. For their own good, they have been exiled to the outskirts of Aspen Creek, Montana. Close enough to the Marrok’s pack to have its support; far enough away to not cause any harm.With their Alpha out of the country, Charles and Anna are on call when an SOS comes in from the fae...

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Title:Burn Bright
Author:Patricia Briggs
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Edition Language:English

Burn Bright Reviews

  • Lila

    When you are following characters through the course of several books and you are emotionally invested in their fate, there is a reasonable expectation, even wish for the author to has some end game for them planned and a satisfying conclusion fleshed out, right? I am like this with Kate Daniels and Dresden. I want them to end on a good note.

    But this isn't the case for me when it comes to Patty Briggs.

    I want her to keep writing books in her shared universe as long as she has stories to tell; I w

    When you are following characters through the course of several books and you are emotionally invested in their fate, there is a reasonable expectation, even wish for the author to has some end game for them planned and a satisfying conclusion fleshed out, right? I am like this with Kate Daniels and Dresden. I want them to end on a good note.

    But this isn't the case for me when it comes to Patty Briggs.

    I want her to keep writing books in her shared universe as long as she has stories to tell; I want to read about Mercy, Adam, Anna, Charles, Bran and the rest of her characters forever. I think this same thing every time I finish new book she releases. There is this perfect sense of comfort that comes with reading the first sentence and being immersed into this world once again and just a perfect sense of satisfaction when you reach the end.

    I thought it was interesting that after three books where we followed Anna and Charles traveling on some werewolves business, we are once again back in Aspen, where first book in series,

    , took place. So, if during first half or so, you have a feeling it reminds you of book #1, you are not alone in this. I really believe it's a deliberate move and, actually, a very clever one because by seeing Anna dealing with the Pack, especially in time of crisis, we can actually compare, measure and determine just how much she progressed and changed from that scared, abused girl Charles and Bran brought with them from Chicago.

    Bare bones: Bran is away and he left Charles in charge. When one of the wildings sends urgent note asking for Marrok to come, Charles and Anna are the one to respond. What they find are death, intruders and revelation that there is traitor in their Pack.

    -Ok, let's go with the plot. There is a strong mystery plot weaved into story leading to the revelation of the traitor. And to be honest, I did feel a bit gutted when my suspicions (because, Patty did leave us a just enough of crumbs between those Red Herrings, trust me on this) proved to be right.

    For a good emotional impact, it had to be someone we know and like. BUT, and herein lies the rub, the whole thing with a traitor, as I figured, can possibly lead to many interesting directions in future books, because, it's definitely a plot twist with long-reaching consequences:

    *the fact that traitor was able to lie and be there for years,

    *the fact that the Pack is now aware they have a powerful enemy out there who is actively gathering info on them,

    *the fact that the Pack is now in possession of some things Fae would be really interested to know about.

    *some relationships between main characters in series are changed, maybe even challenged.

    -I am one of those weirdos who never complains how some parts of the Mercy or A&O books were boring because they were just talking. Nope, I really, honestly, even enjoyed reading about horses in DH because Briggs's writing is so soothing and lovely and interesting and it never feels like info-dumping, but rather it feels like a story inside the book to me. I guess it's because I found the whole werewolf dynamics so fascinating to read. They are written to be fundamentally different from humans and not just because they are able to change into giant wolves or posses some traits like possessiveness or they don't look directly in the eyes thing- these are common to find in other books. It's the details- the subtle way Anna tries to help her mate with her music when he's sad; the clever lengths she has to go to manipulate those stronger than her to do what she wants without directly ordering it; the way Bran's plan are always not what they seem at first or how Leah brings the cookies at the right moment to defuse uncomfortable situation. So, reading about their every-day Pack life and how they make even those mundane decisions like bring back musical nights really interests me. With that caveat, I'd say that beginning is definitely on the slower side because they do these kind of things, but once they hit the wildings it's a non-stop suspense. So, have that in mind.

    -I love Anna and Charles, ok? Anna as Omega is proving to be the most valuable person this Pack has, not just one to be treasured. So, here is what Patty showed us about her in BB: we know from prequel novella what happened to Anna in Chicago, how she was turned against her will and abused for years. This is not brushed under the rug, Anna still suffers from flashes bordering on panic attacks when someone holds her down. The difference is, she is working through this alone in her head, sometime with success, sometimes not. She knows there are wolves, not to mention Charles, who will protect her with everything they have, but past trauma does get the best of her more times than not and I find that believable. But she is so much better at dealing both with her past and present danger. Another awesome thing: you know how Bran and Charles basically uprooted Anna from Chicago and everything she once knew to bring her to Aspen? You have to admit, it was not really an ideal situation for her. But, Anna in this book decided she wants to get back at college and she wants to learn Japanese language. And Charles is perfectly fine with that and it's my favorite thing to witness and see how far she came and how much their relationship progressed to something awesome. Charles is always incredibly aware of his mate and her needs and emotions and, hence, unmistakably knows what she needs. He gives her space, allows her to shine because he knows what she can do; he doesn't smother her or overprotects even when his wolf wants them to. And speaking of that, I always thought that Charles was the werewolf who is the most in-tuned with his wolf. Guys, in this book we will see Brother Wolf being sassy, rebelling and even narrow-minded. You really get to see just how much work it takes for human to control their wolf when even Charles is having problems sometimes and Brother Wolf flat-out disobeys and does his thing.

    -which brings me to wildings. I actually went back to see if wildings were mentioned in previous books and they weren't, so here is the brief explanation: wildings are mostly troubled, damaged, old wolves Bran took and let them live on the Pack territory, but deep in the woods, not with the Pack itself. I thought at first it's weird because Bran's pack is already known to live with powerful old wolves on the brink of insanity (Asil, for example). The difference is that Asil is at least manageable where wildings are really broken wolves and dangerous to live with and Bran is usually the one to deal with them simply because he is the strongest. There was something really sad about the whole arrangement, especially since we see some of them who are perfectly fine to live with others chose to live in isolation to be with someone who is not. When we witness these werewolves being strong, glorious, powerful, supernatural through the course of both series, seeing so many of them in that sorry state was a bit somber. I do question the fact we just got to know about them in this book. When Mariposa attacked in Cry Wolf, a witch with a power to tie the wolves to herself, you'd think she would go after wildings first or stumble upon them considering how many time she spent in the woods. Plot convenient or not, every one of the wildings has interesting background and a story behind their troubled state and I actually wanted to know more about some of them.

    -Now, the cover is depicting one particularly interesting scene which basically confirms that witches in this world are scary. The villain is something more and something else (and I loved how Patty incorporated another myth in this world), but you can expect witchy fingers tied to the mess in Aspen. Somehow, between werewolves, Fae and vampires, witches tend to fall between cracks because there aren't many of them, but every time one appears they are able to cause serious havoc and damage. They are particularly damning for werewolves- we know how Bran reacts to them and we know why. Can you tell how much excited for Tom & Moira book I am? :)

    -Now, I did have some issues. As much as I liked that Patty finally showed us something else from Leah beside being bitchy and to do that in the same book she threw some dirt on Bran's impeccable, lovable image, I didn't like the reason she tried to justify Leah's dislike toward Mercy with. They are both more complex and interesting characters than we perceived them, so there is no need for explaining too many bad traits and character decisions with female jealousy. Plus, all that I put under first spoiler tag. Also, I spent bigger part of the novel saying "WTH Bran?" I am not really sure about how is he going to deal with the whole aftermath of the traitor, but his reputation of reading minds I expect will take a hit. He definitely didn't handle the problem as Alpha.

    Also, this is my take on THAT conversation. Honestly, I never perceived it as a retcon of relationship between Bran and Mercy, but establishing once again the reason for why she had such a hard time. If you didn't get it, werewolf dynamic is completely fucked up, especially when it comes to women. Female werewolves are not able to carry children, so yes, they would see Mercy, someone we are told possibly be able to carry one because her change isn't violent as a threat. That's why so many of them were jealous of her. BUT, I didn't understand Charles's comment of Bran being funny about her to mean that Bran was interested- it's just that Bran had a different relationship with her because she is a damn coyote walker and she rebelled. In a society that's completely relying on rigidity and hierarchy with one man on the top, the fact there is a girl Bran can't really order around through Pack magic and established rules of werewolf world definitely meant he was funny about her, simply because she didn't respond the same way others in his Pack were. She exasperated him, something other wolves can never say about their omnipotent Alpha. Yeah, he was funny with her comparing to how he was with them, but he would never moved on her because he doesn't see her that way. The fact that Leah and other female werewolves and Charles saw possibility of something like that is

    . Don't forget that Adam's Pack was not better in understanding the feelings of their Alpha; they think only about what's in his power to do, not what he really wants to do. Do, I like it? Not particularly. But I will definitely not rely on werewolves as having a clear vision on things. Allow me to give you an example from

    :

    So, Anna's first thought on Leah's comment was that Leah wants Charles even though she knows Bran is Charles's father. Or how about the fact that Anna wasn't aware how much it bothered her that Sage has a pet name for her mate. It's not rational thinking, it doesn't mean jackshit in their world who is bonded and feelings. They perceive other women as competition even when the man they are jealous about didn't give them any reason to. Like I said, it's the fucked up way they are written and I would like for Patty to make some progress about this because jealousy is really getting old as justification for being awful.

    All in all, another book I liked and enjoyed the hell out of it, despite these issues, but I do understand how some readers can be bothered by it. (-_-)

  • ♥Rachel♥

    Charles and Anna are holding down the fort in Aspen Creek, while Bran, the Marrok is off on vacation. The story takes off quickly when one of the “wildling’s” (old wolves that are no longer safe to associate around Pack on a regular basis) mate calls for help. Anna and Charles go to investigate and find a lot more than they bargained for. There’s a lethal threat, assisted by a traitor in the Pack, and Anna and Charles must figure out if the traitor is one of the “wildlings”, or a closer Pack mem

    Charles and Anna are holding down the fort in Aspen Creek, while Bran, the Marrok is off on vacation. The story takes off quickly when one of the “wildling’s” (old wolves that are no longer safe to associate around Pack on a regular basis) mate calls for help. Anna and Charles go to investigate and find a lot more than they bargained for. There’s a lethal threat, assisted by a traitor in the Pack, and Anna and Charles must figure out if the traitor is one of the “wildlings”, or a closer Pack member. Either way, they must warn all the “wildlings” of the danger, and so begins the thrill ride!

    Got some

    insight on Bran (never suspected that!), and his abilities, which clarified something he was able to pull off in

    (the previous book in the Mercy Thompson series). Anna’s abilities as an Omega wolf get more awesome as the series progresses. Especially as she investigates and understands her power more.

    As usual, Charles and Anna face the conflicts and danger as a united front, lending power or support to each other whenever needed. Theirs is a mature romance, without unnecessary drama, or petty jealousies. There’s plenty of love and passion between the two of them, when they’re not battling for their lives, that is!

    A big betrayal, Pack dynamics, Asil and Sage, and a

    different view of Leah all factor in, as well, in this exciting installment of the Alpha & Omega series. There’s never all dull moment, even when the action is a bit on hold, because trying to discover the culprit behind the attacks kept me guessing! Alpha & Omega continues to be one of my all-time favorite urban fantasy series’, so of course I gobbled Burn Bright up! Even though the mystery wraps up here, I’m already eagerly anticipating the next book!

    This review is also posted at

  • Jessica ❁ ➳ Silverbow ➳ ❁ Rabid Reads

    HOO boy.

    DEAD HEAT, the last book from the Anna and Charles portion of the MERCY THOMPSON universe, is probably my least favorite book in the combined series, so despite my slight preference for the ALPHA & OMEGA characters, I was a bit leery of BURN BRIGHT . . .

    And by "leery" I mean that I hesitated for a whole five seconds before accepting an ARC.

    I love Bran. I love everything about the concept of the Marrock. I love the tiny middle-of-nowhere town for misfit werew

    HOO boy.

    DEAD HEAT, the last book from the Anna and Charles portion of the MERCY THOMPSON universe, is probably my least favorite book in the combined series, so despite my slight preference for the ALPHA & OMEGA characters, I was a bit leery of BURN BRIGHT . . .

    And by "leery" I mean that I hesitated for a whole five seconds before accepting an ARC.

    I love Bran. I love everything about the concept of the Marrock. I love the tiny middle-of-nowhere town for misfit werewolves. And even if Bran isn’t a POV or the focus, his presence still saturates everything Charles and Anna do, b/c he’s the friggin’ Marrock.

    BUT.

    I hate Leah as intensely as I love Bran, so when my friend Steven told me that BURN BRIGHT was Leah-heavy, I

    frowned and squinted.

    *frowns and squints HARD*

    It’s not that bad.

    How can it not be that bad?

    I don’t like Leah either, but now I understand her better, and I’m even somewhat sympathetic to her situation.

    Hmph. I don’t want to understand her. I like hating her.

    *rolls eyes* Just read it.

    So I did.

    I mean, Steven is way more forgiving than I am, but how could I not be curious about Leah—LEAH, whom I hate, loathe, despise, and abominate—being painted in a sympathetic light?

    Would I fall prey to that nonsense? Or was my hatred incorruptible?

    *smirks* Like the events of a single installment could negate years of animosity,

    animosity . . . Except based on Charles’ recollections of Mercy’s youth, Leah had all kinds of legit reasons to dislike her . . . And yeah, she is the Queen of Mean Girls, but she doesn’t actually do anything to endanger the Pack . . .

    Or

    she?

    *laughs maniacally*

    BURN BRIGHT takes you deep into the quagmire of Aspen Creek, to places you didn't even know were there. Old, powerful wolves like Asil who walk an unsteady line between functional and dangerous aren’t the biggest threat facing those who belong directly to the Marrock. Lone wolves and . . .

    things have settled the outskirts of Bran’s domain.

    But the outskirts still belong to the Marrock, and when one of his more solitary wolves is killed after an abduction-gone-wrong, it becomes obvious to Anna and Charles that someone in the Pack selling information to Outsiders.

    But

    ? And

    ?

    Read it and find out. *grins cheekily*

    Highly Recommended.

  • Niki Hawkes - The Obsessive Bookseller

    [3.5/5 stars] As Patricia Briggs is one of my favorite urban fantasy writers, I love that I have a new release from her to look forward to every year. Reading her books always feels like cuddling up with a warm fuzzy blanket when it’s snowing outside. Burn Bright was a nice installment in the Alpha & Omega series. Perhaps not quite as strong as the last couple of books, but still loads of fun all the same.

    The positives were abundant: an interesting mystery to solve (one which I’m sure we’ll

    [3.5/5 stars] As Patricia Briggs is one of my favorite urban fantasy writers, I love that I have a new release from her to look forward to every year. Reading her books always feels like cuddling up with a warm fuzzy blanket when it’s snowing outside. Burn Bright was a nice installment in the Alpha & Omega series. Perhaps not quite as strong as the last couple of books, but still loads of fun all the same.

    The positives were abundant: an interesting mystery to solve (one which I’m sure we’ll see repercussions from in the next Mercy book), plenty of Anna and Charles awesomeness (because their relationship dynamic is still one of my favorites), Marrok werewolf pack politics (a topic of which I never tire reading), and an easy flow of writing that absorbs you for a good ride. Essentially, all of the basics I’ve come to expect from a Briggs novel in abundance.

    All that said, I wish the book could’ve had tighter pacing, most notably in the second half. The main story halted several times so other stories could be told and, while they were all interesting and completely relevant to the plot, they effectively killed any building momentum for me. It wasn’t a deal-breaker by any means (because the stories were good), but compared to the last two novels where the story practically careened towards the finish in a can’t-put-it-down-for-anything manner, Burn Bright was just okay in that regard.

    Overall, anything Briggs produces is a good read, and this wasn’t an exception. I delighted in learning more about the dynamics within the Marrok’s pack (and especially loved the inclusion of Asil – one of the most interesting side characters in the saga). I love enigmas in books, and Briggs has several she’s been slowing revealing more about for years. It keeps me coming back with gusto!

    I’m a huge fan of this series (and Patricia Briggs herself – you won’t meet a more gracious author) and would recommend them to both urban fantasy fans and those new to the genre. At this point, the link between the Alpha & Omega and Mercy Thompson books is strong enough that you should consider reading both series simultaneously by publication order to avoid major spoilers. Additionally, I would encourage you to pick up Shifting Shadows, a brilliant short story compilation, before diving in to Burn Bright.

    Via The Obsessive Bookseller at

    Other books you might like:

  • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    On sale now, as of March 6, 2018! A solid and enthusiastic four stars. Full review first posted on

    .

    is the fifth and latest novel in Patricia Briggs’ ALPHA AND OMEGA urban fantasy series … actually, it’s more mountainous wilderness fantasy, but it does involve werewolves and witches living amongst humans.

    , though it has different main characters, also intertwines nicely with the main MERCY THOMPSON series.

    Bran, the grand-Alpha or Marrok of most of the we

    On sale now, as of March 6, 2018! A solid and enthusiastic four stars. Full review first posted on

    .

    is the fifth and latest novel in Patricia Briggs’ ALPHA AND OMEGA urban fantasy series … actually, it’s more mountainous wilderness fantasy, but it does involve werewolves and witches living amongst humans.

    , though it has different main characters, also intertwines nicely with the main MERCY THOMPSON series.

    Bran, the grand-Alpha or Marrok of most of the werewolf packs in North America, is still out of town due to the events in the last MERCY THOMPSON book,

    . He phones home and tells his wife Leah and son Charles that he’s leaving them in charge while he takes a trip to Africa to see Samuel, his other son. In Bran’s rather mysterious absence, Charles and his wife Anna try to manage his pack of werewolves and the pack’s finances, and to not get into too many arguments with the irascible Leah.

    This effort gets a lot trickier when Charles gets an urgent phone call from Jonesy, one of the so-called wildings. These are a separate, outlier group of werewolves under Bran’s protection and leadership who live near but apart from the Marrok’s main pack. The wildings are broken beings, fragile and often particularly dangerous, and are rarely seen by anyone except Bran himself. Charles and Anna, an “Omega” werewolf with the helpful talent of calming dominant werewolves, head out to check on Jonesy.

    Jonesy turns out to be a powerful fae who lives in isolation with his werewolf mate, Hester. Hester has been captured by a secretive armed task force that is trying to kidnap ― or kill ― some of the wildings. And the evidence indicates that someone among the wildings or Bran’s main pack is a traitor who is working with these attackers. With Bran incommunicado for some reason, it’s up to Charles, Anna and other members of the Marrok’s pack to try to neutralize the invaders, warn the wildings of the danger they’re in, and find the traitor.

    The mystery in

    is distinctive, though ultimately it didn’t gel for me as well as in the best of Briggs’ books. The plot is somewhat disjointed, though the threads come together fairly well in the end. The logic is occasionally strained. For example, there’s a significant rule involving cell phones not being allowed in wilding territory, where the explanation simply didn’t make sense to me, and a key development involving eye color that seemed highly unlikely under the circumstances. The plot involves both extreme long-term planning by the villain and some improbably rushed action and coincidences. However, as Briggs has frequently done before, she pulls in plot threads from preceding books in the series, weaving in the consequences of earlier events and decisions made by the characters. Though it’s not necessary to have read all of the books in both interlocking series to understand and enjoy

    or any other particular book in these series, it’s certainly conducive to a greater appreciation.

    The highlight of

    is the characters and their interrelationships. Briggs creates well-rounded characters in a fantasy setting who are realistically flawed and believable. It was fascinating to get to know some of the members of Bran’s pack of misfit werewolves better, both characters we’ve met before as well as some new ones. Some poignant moments for several characters add to the depth of this urban fantasy. There was a fascinating aside in the form of an insight into Mercy and Bran’s relationship, and even the detested, hard-hearted Leah becomes a character that the reader develops more understanding and even sympathy for.

    is a solid entry in one of the better ongoing series in the urban fantasy genre. If you haven’t read the previous ALPHA AND OMEGA books, I would recommend starting at the beginning, with

    and

    , but fans of Patricia Briggs and her werewolves will relish this new adventure.

    I received a free copy of this ebook from the publisher through NetGalley. Thanks!!

    I love Patricia Briggs' urban fantasies, and this Alpha and Omega series interlocks very closely with Mercy Thompson's. I'm having trouble keeping my mitts off this one (I got halfway through it last night in one long reading session that lasted until 1 am) even though there are other books I really need to read and review first. I should probably feel worse about that than I do. :D

  • Jilly

    Me trying to figure shit out: Well, okay, I thought it was an okayish book, except for that one conversation that I highlighted because

    So, if I just ignore that conversation....... ugh, I can't! Because if Charles KNEW.... and said others KNEW... it changes the entire Mercy Thompson/Alpha Omega world.

    So, I'm frustrated! Not only do I HAVE to 1-star this book, but I HAVE to write a serious review as to why. You guys know how much I hate having to be serious! I'm against it 99.9

    Me trying to figure shit out: Well, okay, I thought it was an okayish book, except for that one conversation that I highlighted because

    So, if I just ignore that conversation....... ugh, I can't! Because if Charles KNEW.... and said others KNEW... it changes the entire Mercy Thompson/Alpha Omega world.

    So, I'm frustrated! Not only do I HAVE to 1-star this book, but I HAVE to write a serious review as to why. You guys know how much I hate having to be serious! I'm against it 99.99% of the time! But, how do I joke around about a book that throws out some facts that turn one of my favorite characters into a pedophile, and then says some of the pack suspected it? Then, to kick me while I'm down, and rub some salt into my wounds, they started blaming the victim of pedo-bear for the bad behavior of those around her. Oh, well, of course a child should be abused by the mother if the father has sexual feelings for her. That kid was asking for it!

    I'm going to quote the conversation here because it was in the very beginning of the book and really has no relevance on the story here, even though it changes everything on a larger scale:

    Okay, so people knew that this guy, who is thousands of years old had a

    for a girl that was put into his care from the ages of 0-16 years old? And, not only did they turn a blind eye, but they (Leah) abused and mistreated the girl because of the man's inappropriate fixation? And, not only all of that - which sucks and is enough to piss me the hell off - but Anna also says that she

    why Leah hated Mercy and would have hated her too if she was in her shoes? So, Anna is also ruined now, because that is the stupidest, most ignorant attitude I have ever heard. And, she "smiled, just a little", when Charles admitted there was something inappropriate there? Like, she's

    to be right about pedophilia? Bitch, please! I wanted to smack the smug smile off of her face.

    I'm just. I can't even. Where's this going?

    I'm not sure I can go along for the ride.

  • Angela

    (ETA5: More character inconsistencies)

    (ETA4: Update to rating, in light of "the conversation")

    (ETA3: One more, very telling, quote from

    regarding "the conversation")

    (ETA2: Adding to the spoiler section. Some quotes from characters (who I would also expect to know) in other books regarding the subject of that spoiler conversation)

    (ETA: Rating this was hard. I greatly enjoyed the book, but the spoiler section - no matter how small and insignificant it is to the book itself - took aw

    (ETA5: More character inconsistencies)

    (ETA4: Update to rating, in light of "the conversation")

    (ETA3: One more, very telling, quote from

    regarding "the conversation")

    (ETA2: Adding to the spoiler section. Some quotes from characters (who I would also expect to know) in other books regarding the subject of that spoiler conversation)

    (ETA: Rating this was hard. I greatly enjoyed the book, but the spoiler section - no matter how small and insignificant it is to the book itself - took away greatly from my enjoyment. So 4 stars for everything else, -2 stars for that convo. 3 star average, I guess)

    I always eagerly await the newest Patricia Briggs novel. No matter if it's an Anna/Charles book or a Mercy book in the larger world. It has never mattered, because I've always loved the world and loved the characters. Which isn't to say that I haven't had any concerns or issues with the books over the years; I have. They've remained a bright spot in my reading each year. Looking back, Sarah and I have re-read this entire series every single year for the past several years. We can never resist. Once we get a fresh book in our hands, it's time to re-read. To re-visit everyone we love and see the story thus-far, again.

    This time is no different for me, I've finished 

    and I'm immediately diving back into 

    . But I have some different motives this time, too. And this one - spoiler ridden - thought is overriding all other thoughts about this book. It's a small moment, no more than a background conversation while the story gets rolling. And yet, I can't stop thinking about the implications and what it means. Not for the series, or world, because I think it means little in the grand scheme of things. But for me? For me, it may mean the end of my enjoyment of this series.

    You may think that's a bit dramatic. And perhaps it is. But this is a fairly big deal to me. And I'll get into it more below - and mark where I'm talking spoilers very clearly. Before I do, let me talk a little about the story that was told here. And, to be clear, if it wasn't for this conversation (that I quote below), this book would get a solid 4 stars from me. But this conversation could take it down to 2.

    First, timeline-wise, this book takes place immediately following the events of 

    , and thus Bran is out of the country. Which leaves Charles in charge of the Pack for at least a little while. But Bran's absence extends, making me very suspect as to what's going on. I loved this twist. I loved the build-up to it, and the implications of it as well. And I will say that I didn't see the twist coming. I'm not entirely sure that I buy that someone could fool the Marrok, or Charles, for long, but ... it worked for me.

    I think that it's fascinating that Patricia Briggs has found a way to expand the world, right in and around Aspen Creek. I love the addition of the Wildings, and hope that we get to see more of, at least some of, them in the future. They add a further depth that I wasn't expecting.

    There are multiple POVs in this book. More than the normal of just Anna and Charles. We get a few secondary characters that have only short-term roles, and at least one from a character that I wasn't ever expecting: Leah. That POV, in particular, added a lot of depth to her for me. I never really expected to feel anything but hatred for her, and trust me I still can't forgive her treatment of Charles and Mercy, at the very least, but I think I could grow to understand her. Maybe. Probably not, but I do like at least being able to see why Bran's wolf picked Leah. I think it begins to show here, whereas before I never even had the slightest inkling or understanding why.

  • katwiththehat

    I have been the biggest Patricia Briggs fan forever, so I was honestly pretty shocked by this most recent book in the Mercy Thompson/Alpha Omega world. There were some massive revelations about Bran and Mercy that felt extremely unsavory.

    I have been the biggest Patricia Briggs fan forever, so I was honestly pretty shocked by this most recent book in the Mercy Thompson/Alpha Omega world. There were some massive revelations about Bran and Mercy that felt extremely unsavory.

    Bran may not be her father by blood, but one great thing about Briggs' writing is she's very clear that blood isn't what counts. Foster children, step children, adopted children all count as much as bio children. Jesse is treated like Mercy's daughter. Better than her bio mom. Mercy would do anything to save Jesse and has proved it on multiple occasions. Families are formed by choice. By love. And Bran and Mercy have both demonstrated they consider each other father and daughter. That's what make this feel so icky to me.

  • Aisling Zena

    Expected publication 2018.

    Three years from the last book!

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