Cadaver & Queen

Cadaver & Queen

When Lizzie Lavenza enrolled at Ingold as its first female medical student, she knew she wouldn't have an easy time. From class demands to being an outsider among her male cohorts, she'll have to go above and beyond to prove herself. So when she stumbles across what appears to be a faulty Bio-mechanical--one of the mechanized cadavers created to service the school--she jum...

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Title:Cadaver & Queen
Author:Alisa Kwitney
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Cadaver & Queen Reviews

  • Katherine Paschal

    I have no idea why this book has not gotten the hype that it should! I had not even heard of Cadaver & Queen until I was rummaging at the library and I stumbled across the book, with it's eye catching cover and intriguing synopsis. This was a Frankenstein retelling with steampunk elements, a strong female main character, and the best kind of romance!

    I listened to the audiobook and the narrator was great, giving personality and voice to each character, and between the narrator and the writte

    I have no idea why this book has not gotten the hype that it should! I had not even heard of Cadaver & Queen until I was rummaging at the library and I stumbled across the book, with it's eye catching cover and intriguing synopsis. This was a Frankenstein retelling with steampunk elements, a strong female main character, and the best kind of romance!

    I listened to the audiobook and the narrator was great, giving personality and voice to each character, and between the narrator and the written words I felt like I was watching the book unfold instead of just listening.

    I loved everything about the book and really, really hope there will be more. Keep in mind that this could be a standalone since it was wrapped up nicely, but I would love more. I will keep my eyes peeled for more by Alisa.

  • Ella Schantz

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Lavenza is the first female medical student at Ingold, a school in 1800's England. While she struggles to fit in and work around the sexism of a male-dominated school setting, there is a worldwide movement to create a whole army of Bio-Mechanicals. Their purpose is to serve as a soldier in the wars the countries keep waging against each other -

    Elizabeth (Lizzie) Lavenza is the first female medical student at Ingold, a school in 1800's England. While she struggles to fit in and work around the sexism of a male-dominated school setting, there is a worldwide movement to create a whole army of Bio-Mechanicals. Their purpose is to serve as a soldier in the wars the countries keep waging against each other - thus drastically reducing the number of human casualties. They are portrayed to be dumb, simple creatures.

    However, she meets a former student named Victor Frankenstein (I got a chuckle out of the name), who was purportedly murdered by the head professors at Ingold for discovering a dangerous secret that could threaten the stability of the British Empire.

    Overall, I really enjoyed this book. It was a very easy, but engrossing read. The blossoming romance between Lizzie and Victor was no secret from the very beginning, but the author does a good job at drawing out the interactions between the two of them, so they are not thrust into any sort of romantic encounter too soon. Each character is individually different, although there are a few stereotypical cliches attached to each one (i.e. the very wealthy, and very snobby British boy who despises Lizzie on contact, and tries to make her life miserable). The latter half of the book held some subtle plot twists that (in retrospect) I could see coming, but I didn't notice them as I sped through it. However, just because some parts of the plot may be predictable, that doesn't stop this book from being very written and enjoyable.

    The author interspersed occasional historical facts throughout the novel, which as a historical fiction fan, I appreciated. It can become so easy to let a book exist in a vacuum, rather than blended into actual history. This is the perfect young adult novel for anyone who likes history and the creativeness of Mary Shelley's

  • Devann

    Listen I could literally sit around and read Frankenstein retellings all day every day. I'm not exactly sure why because the original novel is really very so-so for me, but I just love all the retellings so much! And somehow they still all manage to be different enough to be interesting. This one features all the familiar faces [plus a guy with a club foot named 'Byram', one guess who he's supposed to be lol] and is set in a steampunk-ish world where the process of bringing bodies back to life i

    Listen I could literally sit around and read Frankenstein retellings all day every day. I'm not exactly sure why because the original novel is really very so-so for me, but I just love all the retellings so much! And somehow they still all manage to be different enough to be interesting. This one features all the familiar faces [plus a guy with a club foot named 'Byram', one guess who he's supposed to be lol] and is set in a steampunk-ish world where the process of bringing bodies back to life is a well-known thing and not something Victor managed on his own.

    I guess some people will think that is too much of a deviation but personally I liked the transformation of Victor from creator to creature just because it's something different than what we are used to and made for a good story in my opinion. I will admit that it's kind of weird to have Victor not be his dramatic mopey bastard self all the time but there's still enough of him in there to recognize I think. I even liked the typical YA romance that would usually drive me up the wall. Incredible ;)

  • Kristen Burns

    I reread Frankenstein recently and am on a quest to read all the retellings! And this one proved to be a thought-provoking, feminist Frankenstein-inspired story with a twist.

    While not a retelling, per se, this story took characters and ideas from the original novel as a springboard and twisted them in really interesting ways to form something new and really highlight some of the thought-provoking aspects of the original. Our main character was Elizabeth, our love interest Victor,

    I reread Frankenstein recently and am on a quest to read all the retellings! And this one proved to be a thought-provoking, feminist Frankenstein-inspired story with a twist.

    While not a retelling, per se, this story took characters and ideas from the original novel as a springboard and twisted them in really interesting ways to form something new and really highlight some of the thought-provoking aspects of the original. Our main character was Elizabeth, our love interest Victor, except, in this story, Victor

    the monster. He was a bio-mechanical---a reanimated corpse, usually made of stitched-together parts from various different bodies, although Victor was mostly intact with just the arm of a stranger to replace his mangled one.

    The characters were well-written with flaws but also good qualities. My favorite was Byram because of his dry humor and support of Lizzie. I liked Jack too, despite his small role. Lizzie was the protagonist though, and I loved that she was intelligent, strong-willed, and determined. She didn't let the sexism and all the obstacles in her way stop her from chasing after her goals, which made this a fantastically feminist book. Buuuuuut she could also be so self-assured and focused on trying to succeed that she was uncaring toward patients and didn't listen to them, and she butted her head into things that's weren't her business which put not only herself but also others in danger. So she could be frustrating, but she was realistically flawed (which I like), and she did get called out on a lot of her behaviors by other characters.

    Although the pace of the plot was slow, I found myself engrossed by the story. There was so much great stuff going on---mystery, friendship, bio-mechanicals, sinister plans. Oddly enough, I wasn't all that into the romance (though it was plenty believable)---I was more interested in what was going on with the school and the professors, what exactly had happened to Victor, how it would all impact Lizzie, etc.

    I had one main issue though. There were a some threads left hanging, things I didn't quite understand, and things I wanted to know more about. It was like so many of those mysterious/sinister parts of the plot about the school just got dropped. According to the author, there's going to be another book that continues the story (albeit with the focus on different characters), so hopefully these will still get addressed. Maybe someone who's finished the book can help me in case I just missed some things? *SPOILER*

    *END SPOILER*

    One other thing I wanted to mention is that Lizzie thought about how Byram was so attractive that he wouldn't even be friends with her if it weren't for his bad foot bringing him down to her level. She mentioned something similar about some boy she had a crush on and got to know while he was ill. I didn't like the implication that having a disability brings a person's value down. I chocked it up to just being Lizzie's beliefs as a product of the time she lived in, but I wanted to point it out so readers could be aware of this kind of thing not just in this book but in life in general.

    Last but not least, I wanted to talk about the thought-provoking aspect of this book. I mentioned that Victor was entirely intact except for having someone else's arm. That one little arm, however, had a big impact. *SPOILER*

    *END SPOILER* I loved that the author used that to explore the concept of souls and memories and whether our body parts retain a bit of ourselves if they're kept alive after the rest of our body has died. I've heard stories, for example, about people who got heart transplants and then started acting like the person the heart originally belonged to, and things like that make me wonder. When we die, if some part of our body remains alive, does part of our soul, or maybe some imprint of it, remain with it? Or in cases like the heart transplants, is there a scientific explanation? (I did read something about cell memory.) But in the case of fictional Frankenstein stories, if someone is reanimated, do they get their soul back? What if they're composed from the parts of a whole bunch of people, do they even get a soul? A whole bunch of souls? Maybe that's why the other bio-mechanicals were mindless---they were confused by having too many souls in one body. This book doesn't go in-depth into any of this, nor does it force any belief on the reader, but it's definitely an interesting part of the story.

    As for the audio, I struggle with audiobooks in general, but I thought Saskia Maarleveld did a wonderful job. She read in a way that sounded normal rather than overdramatic, and she did men's voices well and made them sound natural with proper inflection and emotion (those are the two things I usually have the biggest issue with).

    Overall, this book gripped me with its mysteriousness and its feminism and its unique twist on the Frankenstein story, and hopefully those loose threads will be wrapped up in the next book!

    Readers who like Frankenstein retellings, feminist characters, mysterious plots, and thought-provoking reads.

    --------------------

    A thought-provoking, feminist Frankenstein-inspired story with a twist! Full review soon.

  • Heather (Curious Fox Reads)

    This book was one of my most anticipated reads for the year. I mean look at that Cover! Intriguing right? And a Frankenstein retelling! Psh.. Heck Yes!!

    However, it fell a little short for me. The idea of the story was definitely there and intriguing, but as I got reading, I felt the story start to get a little choppy, Jumping from here to there, or having conversations with characters that were unnecessary.

    Then by the ending, I had all these things come up... that were never answered or explain

    This book was one of my most anticipated reads for the year. I mean look at that Cover! Intriguing right? And a Frankenstein retelling! Psh.. Heck Yes!!

    However, it fell a little short for me. The idea of the story was definitely there and intriguing, but as I got reading, I felt the story start to get a little choppy, Jumping from here to there, or having conversations with characters that were unnecessary.

    Then by the ending, I had all these things come up... that were never answered or explained. The ending literally felt like a well... I need to end this, so this is going to happen. It didn't leave me satisfied, left too many things unanswered, and was extremely rushed. There was easily about 50 pages more that could have been written to tie everything up nicely.

    The idea was there, it was good, but I felt it wasn't executed as well as it could have been. So I'm giving it 3 🌟 🌟 🌟 Stars.

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  • Jay G

    Want to see more from me? Check out my youtube channel:

    Thank you to Harper Collins for sending me a copy for honest review

    Lizzie Lavenza is the first female medical student to be enrolled at the prestigious Ingold School in England during the 1800s. She faces a lot of prejudice and quickly realizes she will need to work twice as hard as her male counterparts. Upon arriving, she meets a former student named Victor Frankenstein who was murdered a few month

    Want to see more from me? Check out my youtube channel:

    Thank you to Harper Collins for sending me a copy for honest review

    Lizzie Lavenza is the first female medical student to be enrolled at the prestigious Ingold School in England during the 1800s. She faces a lot of prejudice and quickly realizes she will need to work twice as hard as her male counterparts. Upon arriving, she meets a former student named Victor Frankenstein who was murdered a few months earlier. Victor is now a Bio-mechanical - part human, part machine. As time goes on, she discovers a sinister plan that the head professors of Ingold are planning that involves the Queen of England and these new Bio-mechanical soldiers.

    I absolutely love retellings, so I was very excited for this Frankenstein retelling! The book was very quick to read and enjoyable. At times, I did find it to be a bit slow, but I enjoyed it none the less. I liked the banter between characters, especially Lizzie and the three boys. The romance was really well done in my opinion and I really enjoyed the slow burn of it. The idea of the bio-mechanicals was also a really cool concept. One major downfall I found was that the ending felt a bit too rushed, but overall it was an enjoyable read!

  • Cindy ✩☽ Savage Queen ♔

    Not sure how I feel about this cover...

    ---

    This sounds amazing! I love Frankenstein, so I am excited to see where this goes.

  • Stephanie

    I've heard this called a Feminist Frankenstein Retelling? I am so here for that!

  • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    A YA reimagining of

    .

    I just received a free copy of the hardback book from Harper Collins for review. Thanks!!

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