Tomorrow: A Novel

Tomorrow: A Novel

A wise old dog travels through the courts and battlefields of Europe and through the centuries in search of the master who granted him immortality “Ornate, vivid, deeply colored, and so precise I could smell and taste the world… The story of a dog crossing continents and centuries in search of the man he loves is moving and tender. I was captivated by its charm from the...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Tomorrow: A Novel
Author:Damian Dibben
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Tomorrow: A Novel Reviews

  • Carol Kean

    This dog is more erudite and articulate than most human writers.

    I love the character. Insightful, observant, wise, and wonderful.

    But... he's a dog. Grant the writer some willing suspension of disbelief, or you'll miss out on a great story. Yes, I'm all for that.

    This one opens with a dog awaiting the return of his beloved Master - for almost two centuries! - thanks to an elixer that allows a man and his dog to live crazy-long lives.

    The dog narrates tales of their time on a battlefield, tending to

    This dog is more erudite and articulate than most human writers.

    I love the character. Insightful, observant, wise, and wonderful.

    But... he's a dog. Grant the writer some willing suspension of disbelief, or you'll miss out on a great story. Yes, I'm all for that.

    This one opens with a dog awaiting the return of his beloved Master - for almost two centuries! - thanks to an elixer that allows a man and his dog to live crazy-long lives.

    The dog narrates tales of their time on a battlefield, tending to the wounded.

    He's there in 1815 when Napolean meets Waterloo.

    Betrayals, insanely wrong imprisonments, adventures, mishaps, reunions - this is a long story, beautifully told.

    My willing suspension of disbelief, however, kept kicking in. I was barely able to stay in the story. I read to escape, and sometimes, I just don't have the wherewithal to work at reading.

    I'm spoiled by Jack London, who kept his dog adventures on the shorter side.

    Also, London's dogs didn't sound like they had a PhD in literature or philosophy.

    Still!

    This is a most endearing story, with memorable scenes and characters, and heartbreak, as our immortal dog outlives his canine companions.

    Be strong.

    I wanted to savor every word, but this is a long novel, so I skimmed the parts where mortal dog friends die (sniff! sob!) and jumped ahead to where - FINALLY - dog and Master are reunited, and traitors are exposed.

    I'm a broken record, but here I go again: Historical Fiction is not for the faint of heart.

    Brutal stuff, beautifully written.

  • Carla

    The story of a man and his very loyal dog, Tomorrow. The master goes missing and the dog stays in Venice waiting for him for 127 years. The tale is told from the view point of Tomorrow and is well written, funny, touching, and a joy to read.

    This is one of the giveaways I've received from Goodreads.

  • Rachel Rose

    Damien Dibben’s forthcoming novel, Tomorrow, follows the journey of one extraordinary dog on his quest to be reunited with his extraordinary master. On this hazardous road, both dog and master are forced to confront the ethics and pitfalls of love, loyalty and eternal life—all this unfolding over centuries across the canvas of war-torn Europe. The story is enchanting and tender, the details accurate and thought-provoking, whether chronicling the horrors of war, the best of human art and innovati

    Damien Dibben’s forthcoming novel, Tomorrow, follows the journey of one extraordinary dog on his quest to be reunited with his extraordinary master. On this hazardous road, both dog and master are forced to confront the ethics and pitfalls of love, loyalty and eternal life—all this unfolding over centuries across the canvas of war-torn Europe. The story is enchanting and tender, the details accurate and thought-provoking, whether chronicling the horrors of war, the best of human art and innovation, or the truly noble character of a good dog.

  • Aisling

    A book to keep and re-read. A book I will be sending to friends. Forget that I love dogs and the perspective is heart breakingly pure since it is the dog's; this is a poignant, thought provoking book about living and love and family and (oh good grief I could go on--redemption, friendship, invention and war....) The author has a true gift for scenes which transport the reader to another time, another life.

    Plot wise this book grabs you from page one and never lets up. Mr. Dibben is a very talent

    A book to keep and re-read. A book I will be sending to friends. Forget that I love dogs and the perspective is heart breakingly pure since it is the dog's; this is a poignant, thought provoking book about living and love and family and (oh good grief I could go on--redemption, friendship, invention and war....) The author has a true gift for scenes which transport the reader to another time, another life.

    Plot wise this book grabs you from page one and never lets up. Mr. Dibben is a very talented writer and I highly recommend this book!

  • Jasmine

    I won an ARC of this book from Goodreads Giveaways.

    is a beautifully written novel which draws the reader into the world of a dog searching for his master. Dibben provides a thoughtful look at the human race through the eyes of man's most loyal friend. Through the eyes of this insightful puppy, we celebrate the great achievements of mankind and witness the horrors we are capable of inflicting.

    Yet, I struggle to say much more about this novel. The middle of the story lags a bit and conta

    I won an ARC of this book from Goodreads Giveaways.

    is a beautifully written novel which draws the reader into the world of a dog searching for his master. Dibben provides a thoughtful look at the human race through the eyes of man's most loyal friend. Through the eyes of this insightful puppy, we celebrate the great achievements of mankind and witness the horrors we are capable of inflicting.

    Yet, I struggle to say much more about this novel. The middle of the story lags a bit and contains an odd lecture on not eating meat, the combination of which almost caused me to throw down the book (despite being a pescatarian, myself). I feel I cannot give a fair review without finishing a book, so I pressed on. 

    The ending of the book was worth the middle. While most of the twists and turns are predictable, Dibben's treats the reader to an unexpected and wonderful conclusion. He reveals the strength and beauty of tragedy, the peace of forgiveness, the complicated dynamic of familial love, and leaves the reader with a wonderful bit of hope. It is in these last one-hundred or so pages that the reader can see the author's purpose revealed. His purpose is beautiful and wonderful, but I am not sure it is cohesive throughout the novel. 

    So, I leave you with a review that doesn't feel complete as I try to reconcile my emotions and thoughts regarding this novel. 

  • Cindy Burnett

    3.5-4 stars

    Tomorrow relays the story of a loyal dog searching the European continent for his owner Valentyne during the 1700 and 1800’s. Both Valentyne and the dog are immortal following Valentyne’s discovery of a method that stops aging. While the story addresses love, loyalty, and heartbreak, the insight regarding the pitfalls of remaining frozen at a certain age while everyone else around those characters continues to age provides the most food for thought in Tomorrow. This aspect of Tomorrow

    3.5-4 stars

    Tomorrow relays the story of a loyal dog searching the European continent for his owner Valentyne during the 1700 and 1800’s. Both Valentyne and the dog are immortal following Valentyne’s discovery of a method that stops aging. While the story addresses love, loyalty, and heartbreak, the insight regarding the pitfalls of remaining frozen at a certain age while everyone else around those characters continues to age provides the most food for thought in Tomorrow. This aspect of Tomorrow is reminiscent of How to Stop Time by Matt Haig. While the idea of immortality might appeal to some, the actuality would instead be a curse.

    While I enjoyed the tales of travel through fascinating periods in Europe, the book is longer than necessary. I enjoyed and was surprised by events at the end but had to skim a bit to get there. Overall, I liked the book. I received this book to read and review. All opinions are my own.

  • Jaline

    Some of my Goodreads friends will love this book, while others definitely will not. I enjoyed this novel a great deal while acknowledging there are aspects to it that may not attract all readers.

    It is a fantasy, although the only part that is fantasy is that our main protagonist, a dog, along with his master and his master’s nemesis all have eternal life. They can be killed, but it is very difficult to do so; and that’s why their story gallivants throughout history with an amazing in-person (and

    Some of my Goodreads friends will love this book, while others definitely will not. I enjoyed this novel a great deal while acknowledging there are aspects to it that may not attract all readers.

    It is a fantasy, although the only part that is fantasy is that our main protagonist, a dog, along with his master and his master’s nemesis all have eternal life. They can be killed, but it is very difficult to do so; and that’s why their story gallivants throughout history with an amazing in-person (and in-dog) perspective of how things change over centuries – and how they stay the same.

    The dog’s master, Valentyne, has the mind of a scientist in a time when science barely existed. Their story actively begins in 1602 but from what I deduced, it was somewhere in the late 1400’s or early 1500’s when Valentyne discovered a way to access immortality. Valentyne calls his dog, ‘my champion’, and he is indeed that. At one point they become lost to each other and the dog spends 127 years waiting for his master in close proximity to the spot where his master said he would meet him just before they were separated.

    Throughout this book, we move back and forth between their "present time" (the early 1800's) and times in the past. Some readers don’t enjoy this device but for me, this read depended on it. Partly to give dimension to the idea of immortality, but also because had we stayed only with Valentyne’s story or only with his ‘champion’s’ story, we would lose so much.

    Valentyne and his ‘champion’s’ travels throughout Europe are fascinating, for Valentyne puts himself into service by way of becoming an army doctor. During those centuries there was definitely no shortage of wars to choose from. Some of the descriptions of these wars were so real, it was cinematic – and because it was war, sometimes uncomfortably cinematic.

    There are tragedies, but there are also beautiful and heartwarming times. I can understand completely why Valentyne chose to ensure that his companion through eternity was a dog he loved. When things went awry, he would invariably say, “Tomorrow, things will be better”. Who could believe that more deeply than a dog? Especially one who was willing to do his part to make it so.

  • Ms.pegasus

    The future can offer both hope and despair. For the canine protagonist of this novel, “tomorrow” augurs a new day filled with hope and possibility. Without that hope he would be bereft of a reason to live.

    The words echo in his mind. It is what his master would say in the face of disappointment or set-back. This particular dog, however, has greeted 127 years of tomorrows with the hope of hearing that voice again. One perfect day, over a century ago, his master mysteri

    The future can offer both hope and despair. For the canine protagonist of this novel, “tomorrow” augurs a new day filled with hope and possibility. Without that hope he would be bereft of a reason to live.

    The words echo in his mind. It is what his master would say in the face of disappointment or set-back. This particular dog, however, has greeted 127 years of tomorrows with the hope of hearing that voice again. One perfect day, over a century ago, his master mysteriously vanished from St. Mark's Cathedral in Venice.

    (Location 833) And so the dog has waited, year after year.

    Although this book is narrated by the dog, it is no mere light-weight anthropomorphic fantasy. His master's story began long before the dog's. His medieval travels exposed him to alchemy, chemistry and medicine, still intertwined in a world of questions without answers. The dog was born in 1602 but vestiges of that world still linger. An atmosphere of gothic mystery pervades the opening scene in the aftermath of a week long storm:

    (Location 65)

    (Location 78) Inevitably, a corpse turns up on the beach. The unsettling fact is not the corpse but the dog's master's reaction — a mix of inexplicable dread followed by a puzzling sense of relief.

    A second prologue jumps ahead five years. The setting is England, and there is an implicit contrast between the Elizabethan cultural glories of the past and the Stuart monarch's dour lack of curiosity. The dog is no longer a puppy, but he is still an innocent. He recalls the sudden appearance of a flamboyant stranger named Vilder, someone from his master's past. The man exudes a malign charm. He asks a strange favor, is refused, and departs the next day.

    The author employs inventive morphological conversions to sustain an archaic sense. The dog smells the beached corpse:

    (Location 102) He portrays Venice:

    (Location 465)

    The present-day narrative is set in 1815 with intermittent flashbacks to Amsterdam at the outset of the Thirty Years War, to a remote village in the Carpathians, and to the horrors of Europe's battlefields.

    The choice of a dog as narrator is particularly affecting. For many of us, dogs are truly best friends, not pets but part of the family. Their lifespans are tragically brief, a mere ten to fifteen years. To imagine almost endless longevity in a dog is an inviting prospect. The baggage of human immortality implied in the myth of Prometheus, countless sci-fi dystopias, and the exotic romance of LOST HORIZON is at first easily dismissed in the case of a dog. However, the more sentient the dog becomes, the more he displays compassion, courage and connection, the more we encounter the same reservations. There is even a sense of nostalgia as the dog describes the splendors of Venice through the exuberant eyes of his young companion Sporco.

    I loved this book. When it ended I felt the rare sensation of regret. It was an unexpected pleasure to feel immersed in a gothic tradition reminiscent of Mary Shelley and Bram Stoker. Dibben provides unexpected plot twists and unforgettable sketches of historical figures and events. At the heart of this book is the idea of timeless connection. His master points to the dog:

    (Location 1942) For this dog, the feeling is mutual. What is he without his master?

  • Carole (Carole's Random Life in Books)

    This review can also be found at

    .

    I have to admit that I was a little disappointed by this book. I went into this book with incredibly high expectations so some of that disappointment is of my own making. When I first saw this book's cover, I knew that I had to read it. Then I read the book's synopsis and knew that I would love it. I ended up liking the book but I didn't love it.

    This is Champion's story and is told from his point of view. Champion is not just an any

    This review can also be found at

    .

    I have to admit that I was a little disappointed by this book. I went into this book with incredibly high expectations so some of that disappointment is of my own making. When I first saw this book's cover, I knew that I had to read it. Then I read the book's synopsis and knew that I would love it. I ended up liking the book but I didn't love it.

    This is Champion's story and is told from his point of view. Champion is not just an any dog. He is immortal and has lived for 217 years. Champion was separated from his master in Venice over 100 years ago and has spent that time waiting for him as he was told to do. He has made connections with others and even rescued another dog, Sporco, but he never stops looking for his master.

    The timeline of this story does jump around a bit. We see Champion after waiting for more than 100 years for his master before going to search for him and we also see different points in the past before they lost each other. I never found the time sequence to be confusing. It really seemed like the points in the past were important to the story and felt more like memories. I really liked the historical setting of the novel which spans from the 1600's into the 1800's which I thought added a lot to the story.

    I really enjoyed Champion's journey to find his master more than any other part of the book. Sporco was my favorite character by far and I enjoyed his love of life. I really felt like Sporco felt much more dog-like than Champion did. Champion has lived a very long time and is wiser than most humans. His most dog-like quality would be his loyalty to his master.

    The book felt a bit uneven to me with some parts falling flat. I liked the parts of the book that were focused on what the dogs were doing the most. During the last part of the book, the focus seemed to shift more to the humans as witnessed by the dog which wasn't as enjoyable for me. There were times that the book felt like it was longer than it needed to be and dragged at points.

    I think that a lot of readers will enjoy this one a bit more than I did. It is a really unique story set in a vividly described period of time. I didn't love the book as much as I had hoped I would but I am glad that I made the decision to read it. I would definitely read more of Damian Dibben's works in the future.

    I am a bit disappointed with this one. The last part of this book fell really flat to me. It seemed like things became more about the people than the dog and I liked the parts more focused on the dog. This was probably more of a 2.5 star read for me but I am rounding up for now.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.