Brave

Brave

My life, as you will read, has taken me from one cult to another. Brave is the story of how I fought my way out of these cults and reclaimed my life. I want to help you do the same.-Rose McGowanA revealing memoir and empowering manifesto – A voice for generations.Rose McGowan was born in one cult and came of age in another, more visible cult: Hollywood.In a strange world w...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Brave
Author:Rose McGowan
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Brave Reviews

  • Ian

    I'm not going to review this book.

    I'm not going to talk about Rose McGowan.

    I'm not going to talk about how much better I am than all those "other" men.

    I'm a male.

    I'm a white male.

    I'm a white male heterosexual.

    This book isn't about the other men. It's about every man. It's about every woman.

    What I'm going to do is look at myself and think about the things I can do better.

    So buy this book. Read it. Give it to your daughters and give it to your sons.

  • lov2laf

    Quite frankly, this was fantastic.

    Whatever image of Rose McGowan you've had previously, scrap it. Whatever box/label/crazy filter/gas lighting/perception of her you have or see currently in the media, set that aside, too.

    Instead, take some time and just listen. Hear this story. Because, for me, it was my story, too, and I'm guessing it's many of yours. The book is, in fact, brave and, dare I say it, trailblazing.

    And also at its most fundamental level, the book is incredibly well-written and inte

    Quite frankly, this was fantastic.

    Whatever image of Rose McGowan you've had previously, scrap it. Whatever box/label/crazy filter/gas lighting/perception of her you have or see currently in the media, set that aside, too.

    Instead, take some time and just listen. Hear this story. Because, for me, it was my story, too, and I'm guessing it's many of yours. The book is, in fact, brave and, dare I say it, trailblazing.

    And also at its most fundamental level, the book is incredibly well-written and intelligent. It makes one think and feel. Rose McGowan reading her own words in audiobook form is completely engaging and offers additional impact, as well.

    To men, this is not a male bashing book but an eye-opening one that hopefully enhances your perception and empathy for the female experience and even your own. I would urge anyone to read this.

    In my own experience, I know "Rose McGowan" as a name, as an actress that's been around for awhile but I don't think I've seen one single movie or tv show she's been on. She caught my attention when I learned she is the impetus behind the #metoo movement, the actress that brought down the elite and ignited a tidal wave of voices.

    This book starts with McGowan's early years, detailing her experiences in a spiritual cult as a child, the gender discrimination she encountered and was aware of as she became older, and moves through her years in Hollywood where she reveals the abuse of women she saw and endured.

    The book is not a gossip tell-all or a "poor me" diary. This is McGowan illustrating a much bigger picture about the abuses of women in Hollywood and society at large. And, it is absolutely true.

    For me personally, I have

    heard anyone's experience in childhood that paralleled so closely to my own in the realms of trauma or gender and its life-long lasting effects. It makes the book resonate and lets me know McGowan's voice is completely authentic and without exaggeration.

    Do know, because the book is about misogyny and abuse and often is in explicit detail, it can be triggering to a reader.

    On the whole, I found the book to be empowering, eye-opening, validating, and hopeful.

    Absolutely recommend.

  • Glitterbomb

    First off, "feminist" is not a dirty word, and fuck you if you think it is. You're exactly the kind of person who should read this.

    I know a lot of men and women (yes, women too) who are going to

    this book. They are going to palm it off as feminist bullshit, roll their eyes, and then bask in their own egotism. They're going to say "That doesn't happen anymore, this is all over sensationalised!". Sorry sweetheart, hate to break it to you, but it does still happen. Every day. Everywhere. Its

    First off, "feminist" is not a dirty word, and fuck you if you think it is. You're exactly the kind of person who should read this.

    I know a lot of men and women (yes, women too) who are going to

    this book. They are going to palm it off as feminist bullshit, roll their eyes, and then bask in their own egotism. They're going to say "That doesn't happen anymore, this is all over sensationalised!". Sorry sweetheart, hate to break it to you, but it does still happen. Every day. Everywhere. Its probably happening to you and you don't even realise it.

    My son once brought a friend home. This friend was telling me about a girl in his class, and he kept referring to her as a slut. They were 14 at the time.

    I said to this boy that I don't appreciate that kind of talk in my house, and instead of taking the hint and shutting up, he kept saying it. He tried to get around me by spelling it out "S.L.U.T" as if that somehow justified it. I eventually asked him to leave, sat my son down, explained how I have a zero tolerance policy on shaming women in any way and told him this boy was no longer welcome in our home.

    I later found out that this boy was going around their school calling me a feminist (in a derogatory way - I'm actually very proud of my feminism). He was blatantly slandering me and using my status as a single parent to shame me. I was

    . I called up this boys mum, who at the time was a friend, and told her what he was doing. I did this so she was aware of his attitude and perhaps prevent other girls being shamed and degraded in the future. I did it out of concern. Do you know what she said to me?

    No - "You're right, that's unacceptable, Ill talk to him about it".

    Not even a simple - "I'm Sorry."

    She basically said

    and let him get away with it, which is

    I don't nit pick other peoples parenting techniques, but this pissed me off so much, I cant even... It's wrong.

    Needless to say this woman is no longer a friend. She stood by and let her son demean not only a 14 year old girl, but also a grown woman, an adult, and one that she knew had been through

    at the hands of a misogynistic asshole. Those are the only two instances that I was aware of, but I'm sure there were many, many other girls at that school who were regularly being degraded, not only by that boy, but by countless others. And it scared the shit out of me.

    This book stands up and says

    to degradation of any kind. This is the ultimate book on feminism, and Rose, I

    for telling your story. You are going to be an inspiration to thousands and thousands of women who have ever been treated as less than they are. You gave us a voice, and you are it screaming it from the rooftops.

    This isn't just a book about

    , and what

    do, and how

    oppress women. Its also about

    who let it happen, its about the

    who turn a blind eye and brush it all under the rug. It's about how

    Ladies, you are also put in the spotlight here for standing by and letting this happen.

    This is a call to arms, and I am

    grateful to Rose for it.

    5 stars doesn't even come close. I want to give this a million stars. I want to buy every copy in existence and hand them out to everyone I encounter. I want to shake people and say

    Feminism is not a dirty word. Be proud and stand up for yourself and your sex. Empower yourself and every other woman out there. Don't ever let a man, or anyone else categorise you, or put you in a box, or place a label on your forehead. Say "fuck you" to them and embrace yourself for who and what you are.

  • Vanessa

    Here lies a BRAVE female opening up an intelligent discussion and also a complete up yours to every male who ever took a piece of Rose McGowan. She lays it all on the line and leaves nothing in the tank. She exposes the dirty and mysogynist mentally that dominates the Hollywood industry since inception and lays it all bare. She takes our collective voices and shouts for us, in this book she gives all women a shove to speak up and do it LOUDLY. I’ve gotta respect the girl. She’s got real guts and

    Here lies a BRAVE female opening up an intelligent discussion and also a complete up yours to every male who ever took a piece of Rose McGowan. She lays it all on the line and leaves nothing in the tank. She exposes the dirty and mysogynist mentally that dominates the Hollywood industry since inception and lays it all bare. She takes our collective voices and shouts for us, in this book she gives all women a shove to speak up and do it LOUDLY. I’ve gotta respect the girl. She’s got real guts and isn’t afraid of the repercussions. I loved this book, yes I even loved all the anger, rage and hate that spewed forth so freely. There’s no sugar coating or mincing words it’s all blunt and in your face, for far too long woman have had no voice so it’s great to see someone delivering the message loud and clear. Times up! Let us all unite to raise each other and praise the voices leading the charge. Good on you Rose McGowan keep doing you and allowing woman to be heard everywhere. Like Rose we can all be brave. Read this book get inspired and reach out and support our sisterhood. It’s time to change things up once and for all.

  • Imane

    Rose McGowan offers a revealing self-portrait which focuses on the trauma of sexual assault and the experience of being a female actress in Hollywood. This was Honest, Fearless, Powerful and filled with that which makes you fall in love with the author through he

    Rose McGowan offers a revealing self-portrait which focuses on the trauma of sexual assault and the experience of being a female actress in Hollywood. This was Honest, Fearless, Powerful and filled with that which makes you fall in love with the author through her struggles, root for her and most of all, want to turn the pages until you're done.

  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader

    I saw Rose McGowan on an episode of The View recently. I found her edgy, forthcoming, and, well, brave. Hollywood and pop culture are not interests of mine at the moment, but seeing her on The View had me intrigued. When I saw the audiobook available, and that she read it, I figured why not?

    Same with this book. Rose is rough around the edges. She does not mince words. All the same, she says and said things that not many others will. She confronted the hard stuff. She put her heart out there for

    I saw Rose McGowan on an episode of The View recently. I found her edgy, forthcoming, and, well, brave. Hollywood and pop culture are not interests of mine at the moment, but seeing her on The View had me intrigued. When I saw the audiobook available, and that she read it, I figured why not?

    Same with this book. Rose is rough around the edges. She does not mince words. All the same, she says and said things that not many others will. She confronted the hard stuff. She put her heart out there for all to see. Sometimes you think a Hollywood actress has an easy life, but whatever “ease” Rose McGowan found, she earned the hard way. Starting her life raised in a cult in Italy with an alcoholic and abusive father and an emotionally absent mother, Rose had good reason to be a little tempestuous.

    Rose talked about each of her Hollywood relationships, the movies and TV shows she’s done, as well as her life growing up, the incident with “the monster,” and other experiences she had in Hollywood as a female actor and director. She also shared her hope and ideas for future endeavors.

    I found Brave to be engaging (though, at times, it was difficult due to the content), honest, and entertaining. She may not always be well-liked. She may be hard to “hear” at times because she’s brusque; however, Rose’s message about Hollywood and how it shapes women is an important one.

    🎧 Review of the audio read by Rose McGowan. I think hearing her read her own words added to the authenticity and poignancy.

  • Ana

    I read this because I love Rose McGowan.

    Charmed is one of my favorite shows of all time. She is known for her portrayal of Paige Matthews. She appeared in movies such as Scream, Planet Terror, Death Proof and The Doom Generation.

    This is a fascinating, personal, and enjoyable read. Rose was never a typical Hollywood actress. She's no-nonsense and gutsy, as exhibited in 'Brave.'

    I read this because I love Rose McGowan.

    Charmed is one of my favorite shows of all time. She is known for her portrayal of Paige Matthews. She appeared in movies such as Scream, Planet Terror, Death Proof and The Doom Generation.

    This is a fascinating, personal, and enjoyable read. Rose was never a typical Hollywood actress. She's no-nonsense and gutsy, as exhibited in 'Brave.'

    In this book Rose talks about her childhood in the Children of God cult. She also talks about abuse at the hands of Harvey Weinstein.

    You may have heard of the Children of God cult. It's the same cult that the family of River and Joaquin Phoenix once belonged to. Needless to say, they did some gross shit. I blame the stupid parents. First of all: no one in their right mind would willingly join a cult. Second of all, no PARENT in their right mind would willingly join a cult. No wonder River Phoenix was on heroin. People don't forget things like that.

    So, about good ol' Harvey… Is there a woman who hasn't been abused by Harvey Weinstein? Rose calls Harvey 'monster' – and claims he sexually assaulted her. Hell does have a name, and its name is Hollywood. The whole industry is crazy. Kids, stay in school and don't go to Hollywood, cause look what happens.

    Seriously Rose, Marilyn Manson? Girl, what were you thinking? Robert Rodriguez, I completely understand. I'd climb him like a tree. Marilyn Manson, on the other hand, is a huge error in judgment.

    All in all it was an enjoyable read. A must for hollywood aficionados.

  • Luca

    Well, this is one of the most difficult books I have ever reviewed. Memoirs and biographies are always difficult but Brave is filled with so many emotions that it becomes even harder to review.

    First of all, I want to make it clear that I feel that I am no person to judge Rose for what she wrote down about her life. She was born in a cult in Italy and had one hell of a ride for life to her next destination; Hollywood. Except, Hollywood was not so different from her experiences in the cult. She e

    Well, this is one of the most difficult books I have ever reviewed. Memoirs and biographies are always difficult but Brave is filled with so many emotions that it becomes even harder to review.

    First of all, I want to make it clear that I feel that I am no person to judge Rose for what she wrote down about her life. She was born in a cult in Italy and had one hell of a ride for life to her next destination; Hollywood. Except, Hollywood was not so different from her experiences in the cult. She experienced abuse by various people in different ways, and this obviously had an extreme impact on her.

    In Brave, Rose speaks about this in an incredibly powerful way. You can feel her anger and her sadness come to life on these pages. Whilst reading there were so many things going through my mind. Things I would think if I heard this kind of experiences from people close to me or people I barely know... How would other people react? I think it is safe to say that many would be quick to judge (perhaps even me) because that mechanism is deeply embedded in our system.

    But, from reading this book I got one strong lesson. Namely, try not to judge. When you are judging someone, whether it is their experience with sexual abuse or something entirely different, you make a small invasion of their lives. Just listen to their stories, and try to stand up when you recognize wrongdoings.

    Now, back to the book. If I would have to say something about the writing style in this book, I could tell you that there are better-written books out there. Books that are written a lot better. Yet, this is not the thing that weighs most heavy for me with memoirs. Somehow it actually worked out for me when combined with its content.

    I read a review where it was argued that this book should not have been written because Rose McGowan is mentally ill and needed help rather than this book out in the wide world. That I think is not true. In the case she would be mentally ill, she still would have to right to tell her story, and I think that is actually something that can be of help in your healing process. The world should know what the impact of (sexual) abuse is/ can be. Given that not every person has the same experiences I value this book as an honest account of Rose her experience. Not yours, not mine, not the abuser’s, just hers.

    I rated this book 4 out of 5 stars, because Rose, Brave you are.

  • Andrew Smith

    I was certainly aware of Rose McGowan as a movie and television actress, though I’m struggling to recall ever watching a film or programme in which she appeared. So I wasn’t sure what to expect from this autobiographical account – even if the title and cover picture offered a clue. What I certainly wasn’t prepared for was exactly how tough her early life had been and how she’d fallen prey to a series of men who bullied, sexualised and abused her from a very early age. It’s a bleak tale indeed, b

    I was certainly aware of Rose McGowan as a movie and television actress, though I’m struggling to recall ever watching a film or programme in which she appeared. So I wasn’t sure what to expect from this autobiographical account – even if the title and cover picture offered a clue. What I certainly wasn’t prepared for was exactly how tough her early life had been and how she’d fallen prey to a series of men who bullied, sexualised and abused her from a very early age. It’s a bleak tale indeed, but one with a very clear message.

    Rose was born in Italy and raised in a cult in which the leaders were men and women were expected to listen to, obey and even fawn over the males in the group. Her father was a magnetic figure and it seems he took his pleasures from the women without compunction. However, he did draw the line at paedophilia and when he sensed his children were at risk he organised their escape (leaving her mother behind), moving eventually to America.

    In her early years in America she moved around, sometimes living with her father and sometimes not, and eventually even became reunited with her mother – who had by then also escaped the cult. Her mother’s boyfriends (or at least the ones she describes) were predatory and abusive and she once again took off on her own. To earn some money, she took on a role as a film extra and this eventually led her to getting her foot in the Hollywood door. The remainder of the account is centred on the years that followed and predominantly the men she met and had professional and personal relationships with.

    It’s here that we come across a movie executive who, she says, invited her to a meeting at a hotel only to sexually abuse her. The man is not named but it’s very clear that she’s talking about Harvey Weinstein. I listed to an audio version of the book – read by the author – and this section was

    harrowing. The incident clearly affected her a good deal and she was keen to take the matter further but her agent advised her to sweep it under he carpet.

    Later she met a film director – again not named, but identifiable as Robert Rodriguez – with whom she began a five-year relationship. RR turned out to be a jealous bully who eventually pushed McGowan to the point she became ill. From here on she talks a little about how her career progressed but a good deal about her contempt for the male species in general. In fact, the last third of the book is effectively a lecture, explaining how men are power driven, born with perceived entitlement and with a need to control, sexualise and abuse women.

    Ok, I’ve no doubt that Rose had come across more than her fair share of bad men, in fact her upbringing and subsequent career path would pretty much ensure that this was the case, but this book really does feel one-sided. There’s not a single male (other that a couple of casual references to peripheral characters) who behaves well here. Is this just bad luck or, dare I say it, careful editing. I'm tempted to suggest that RM might have a touch of the misandrist about her.

    There’s clearly a good point to be made about the need for female equality but RM’s rant feels like a dreadful over-egging of the pudding. She's extrapolated her own experiences to make more general and wider reaching observations and suggestions. Yes, maybe there are very few female movie directors but – and I can only speak from personal experience – in the area I worked for 40 years, women are starting to get much closer to workplace equality. In fact, in the last ten years of my working life (a period I held my most senior positions) I had more female bosses than male. And male abuse directed towards women was, I strongly believe, nothing like as prevalent as that experienced by the author.

    Towards the end of the book there’s a good deal of self promotion about an album she has coming out and some skin care products she’s working on, but I’d rather switched off by this point. It was a case of a good book gone bad.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.