Brave

Brave

My life, as you will read, has taken me from one cult to another. Brave is the story of how I fought my way out of these cults and reclaimed my life. I want to help you do the same.-Rose McGowanA revealing memoir and empowering manifesto – A voice for generations.Rose McGowan was born in one cult and came of age in another, more visible cult: Hollywood.In a strange world w...

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Title:Brave
Author:Rose McGowan
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Edition Language:English

Brave Reviews

  • Matthew Sciarappa

    #RoseArmy

  • Ian

    I'm not going to review this book.

    I'm not going to talk about Rose McGowan.

    I'm not going to talk about how much better I am than all those "other" men.

    I'm a male.

    I'm a white male.

    I'm a white male heterosexual.

    This book isn't about the other men. It's about every man. It's about every woman.

    What I'm going to do is look at myself and think about the things I can do better.

    So buy this book. Read it. Give it to your daughters and give it to your sons.

  • Belinda Missen

    Phenomenal. Full review coming shortly.

    The media wants us to believe Rose McGowan is unhinged – she’s certainly reported that way in the mainstream. Each day, I open my newsfeed to find yet another story of how she’s ‘gone off the rails’, ‘attacked’ another woman, or women. She acknowledges this in the first few pages of my #bookpublishedin2018, Brave.

    In 2016, almost twelve months before the #MeToo movement gained serious traction, McGowan was already tweeting that she was t

    Phenomenal. Full review coming shortly.

    The media wants us to believe Rose McGowan is unhinged – she’s certainly reported that way in the mainstream. Each day, I open my newsfeed to find yet another story of how she’s ‘gone off the rails’, ‘attacked’ another woman, or women. She acknowledges this in the first few pages of my #bookpublishedin2018, Brave.

    In 2016, almost twelve months before the #MeToo movement gained serious traction, McGowan was already tweeting that she was the victim of abuse. Let’s not even call it ‘Hollywood Abuse’, because it’s prominent in the world for any woman, regardless of profession or place in life.

    Started ten years earlier by Tarana Burke, #MeToo sought to shed light on the amount of abuse – physical, sexual, emotional – that women deal with in the world. It seems that, once #MeToo gained momentum in the populous, only then was McGowan taken seriously, even if Harvey Weinstein and his ‘casting couch’ approach was Hollywood’s worst kept secret. Hell, I knew about it, and I was a loungeroom observer.

    In the first half of the book, we hear about McGowan’s childhood. From the Children of God cult in Italy, to Oregan and Washington, USA. She’s the product of a pinball lifestyle, separated parents, and a sheltered upbringing. Dabbling with drugs and running away, at times I wondered why everyone else got the blame for the shitty situations she ended up in, but I also accept living in a cult would likely put the blinders on someone.

    McGowan stumbled into Hollywood almost by accident. I don’t need to go into detail about what she experienced at the hands of both men, and equally complicit women, in that environment. What I need to say is that this behaviour is no different in any other workplace.

    Before I took my writing seriously, I worked in an office that was eighty-percent men. Other women told me the men were complaining I wasn’t dressing pretty enough for them. I don’t style my hair. I brush it. I don’t wear makeup. It feels revolting. I wore slacks and shirts. I don’t dress up. It’s not me. Yet, I wasn’t pretty enough for the men in the office. My female superior told me I made them, quote ‘uncomfortable’. Newsflash, I’m not here for your comfort. No woman is.

    About a week after I left that job, someone I’d once considered a friend sent me a text message that said: ‘Just so you know, Chris wasn’t the one who organised the bullying of you’. Chris was the office manager. The buck stopped with him.

    McGowan got similar treatment. She didn’t fit the box. She was ostracised and, after her experience with Weinstein, was blacklisted. That seems to have been him modus operandi in Hollywood.

    There was so much I found myself agreeing with in this book. The way women’s jobs are treated as hobbies (pp 174), while men’s are treated as careers. I’ve had men ask me when I’m going to get a ‘real job’, because writing is just a hobby. It’s about ten minutes after that, that they tell me they’ve got great ideas for books, which I could write for them for a nominal percentage of profits.

    I’m not sure people understand how little money you make from writing. I’m also not sure they understand that my job is just as wonderful and serious as theirs, even if they don’t subscribe to that perception simply by virtue of their sex.

    My point being: this book sheds so much light on men, and their perceived ownership of women’s bodies, their looks, and the roles we must play to keep them happy. Girls are fashioned from a young age. Wear this, look like that, he hits you because he loves you, boys don’t love fat girls, all of this and more to ensure that we are comfortable for men. I could go deep into a life's worth of detail over the things I've experienced, but we'd be here forever, and I don't want to dwell on it. What’s worse is other women are equally complicit in this, forcing this ideal onto their daughters.

    Fuck that. Be Brave. Be Different.

    Buy this book.

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  • lov2laf

    Quite frankly, this was fantastic.

    Whatever image of Rose McGowan you've had previously, scrap it. Whatever box/label/crazy filter/gas lighting/perception of her you have or see currently in the media, set that aside, too.

    Instead, take some time and just listen. Hear this story. Because, for me, it was my story, too, and I'm guessing it's many of yours. The book is, in fact, brave and, dare I say it, trailblazing.

    And also at its most fundamental level, the book is incredibly well-written and inte

    Quite frankly, this was fantastic.

    Whatever image of Rose McGowan you've had previously, scrap it. Whatever box/label/crazy filter/gas lighting/perception of her you have or see currently in the media, set that aside, too.

    Instead, take some time and just listen. Hear this story. Because, for me, it was my story, too, and I'm guessing it's many of yours. The book is, in fact, brave and, dare I say it, trailblazing.

    And also at its most fundamental level, the book is incredibly well-written and intelligent. It makes one think and feel. Rose McGowan reading her own words in audiobook form is completely engaging and offers additional impact, as well.

    To men, this is not a male bashing book but an eye-opening one that hopefully enhances your perception and empathy for the female experience and even your own. I would urge anyone to read this.

    In my own experience, I know "Rose McGowan" as a name, as an actress that's been around for awhile but I don't think I've seen one single movie or tv show she's been on. She caught my attention when I learned she is the impetus behind the #metoo movement, the actress that brought down the elite and ignited a tidal wave of voices.

    This book starts with McGowan's early years, detailing her experiences in a spiritual cult as a child, the gender discrimination she encountered and was aware of as she became older, and moves through her years in Hollywood where she reveals the abuse of women she saw and endured.

    The book is not a gossip tell-all or a "poor me" diary. This is McGowan illustrating a much bigger picture about the abuses of women in Hollywood and society at large. And, it is absolutely true.

    For me personally, I have

    heard anyone's experience in childhood that paralleled so closely to my own in the realms of trauma or gender and its life-long lasting effects. It makes the book resonate and lets me know McGowan's voice is completely authentic and without exaggeration.

    Do know, because the book is about misogyny and abuse and often is in explicit detail, it can be triggering to a reader.

    On the whole, I found the book to be empowering, eye-opening, validating, and hopeful.

    Absolutely recommend.

  • Simon

    Rose McGowan’s Brave is a brilliant, bold (and Brave) battlecry to society. A memoir which becomes a manifesto to be kinder, better, not take shit and change things. Highly recommended.

  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader

    I saw Rose McGowan on an episode of The View recently. I found her edgy, forthcoming, and, well, brave. Hollywood and pop culture are not interests of mine at the moment, but seeing her on The View had me intrigued. When I saw the audiobook available, and that she read it, I figured why not?

    Same with this book. Rose is rough around the edges. She does not mince words. All the same, she says and said things that not many others will. She confronted the hard stuff. She put her heart out there for

    I saw Rose McGowan on an episode of The View recently. I found her edgy, forthcoming, and, well, brave. Hollywood and pop culture are not interests of mine at the moment, but seeing her on The View had me intrigued. When I saw the audiobook available, and that she read it, I figured why not?

    Same with this book. Rose is rough around the edges. She does not mince words. All the same, she says and said things that not many others will. She confronted the hard stuff. She put her heart out there for all to see. Sometimes you think a Hollywood actress has an easy life, but whatever “ease” Rose McGowan found, she earned the hard way. Starting her life raised in a cult in Italy with an alcoholic and abusive father and an emotionally absent mother, Rose had good reason to be a little tempestuous.

    Rose talked about each of her Hollywood relationships, the movies and TV shows she’s done, as well as her life growing up, the incident with “the monster,” and other experiences she had in Hollywood as a female actor and director. She also shared her hope and ideas for future endeavors.

    I found Brave to be engaging (though, at times, it was difficult due to the content), honest, and entertaining. She may not always be well-liked. She may be hard to “hear” at times because she’s brusque; however, Rose’s message about Hollywood and how it shapes women is an important one.

    🎧 Review of the audio read by Rose McGowan. I think hearing her read her own words added to the authenticity and poignancy.

  • Ana

    I read this because I love Rose McGowan.

    Charmed is one of my favorite shows of all time. She is known for her portrayal of Paige Matthews. She appeared in movies such as Scream, Planet Terror, Death Proof and The Doom Generation.

    This is a fascinating, personal, and enjoyable read. Rose was never a typical Hollywood actress. She's no-nonsense and gutsy, as exhibited in 'Brave.'

    I read this because I love Rose McGowan.

    Charmed is one of my favorite shows of all time. She is known for her portrayal of Paige Matthews. She appeared in movies such as Scream, Planet Terror, Death Proof and The Doom Generation.

    This is a fascinating, personal, and enjoyable read. Rose was never a typical Hollywood actress. She's no-nonsense and gutsy, as exhibited in 'Brave.'

    In this book Rose talks about her childhood in the Children of God cult. She also talks about abuse at the hands of Harvey Weinstein.

    You may have heard of the Children of God cult. It's the same cult that the family of River and Joaquin Phoenix once belonged to. Needless to say, they did some gross shit. I blame the stupid parents. First of all: no one in their right mind would willingly join a cult. Second of all, no PARENT in their right mind would willingly join a cult. No wonder River Phoenix was on heroin. People don't forget things like that.

    So, about good ol' Harvey… Is there a woman who hasn't been abused by Harvey Weinstein? Rose calls Harvey 'monster' – and claims he sexually assaulted her. Hell does have a name, and its name is Hollywood. The whole industry is crazy. Kids, stay in school and don't go to Hollywood, cause look what happens.

    Seriously Rose, Marilyn Manson? Girl, what were you thinking? Robert Rodriguez, I completely understand. I'd climb him like a tree. Marilyn Manson, on the other hand, is a huge error in judgment.

    All in all it was an enjoyable read. A must for hollywood aficionados.

  • Andrew Smith

    I was certainly aware of Rose McGowan as a movie and television actress, though I’m struggling to recall ever watching a film or programme in which she appeared. So I wasn’t sure what to expect from this autobiographical account – even if the title and cover picture offered a clue. What I certainly wasn’t prepared for was exactly how tough her early life had been and how she’d fallen prey to a series of men who bullied, sexualised and abused her from a very early age. It’s a bleak tale indeed, b

    I was certainly aware of Rose McGowan as a movie and television actress, though I’m struggling to recall ever watching a film or programme in which she appeared. So I wasn’t sure what to expect from this autobiographical account – even if the title and cover picture offered a clue. What I certainly wasn’t prepared for was exactly how tough her early life had been and how she’d fallen prey to a series of men who bullied, sexualised and abused her from a very early age. It’s a bleak tale indeed, but one with a very clear message.

    Rose was born in Italy and raised in a cult in which the leaders were men and women were expected to listen to, obey and even fawn over the males in the group. Her father was a magnetic figure and it seems he took his pleasures from the women without compunction. However, he did draw the line at paedophilia and when he sensed his children were at risk he organised their escape (leaving her mother behind), moving eventually to America.

    In her early years in America she moved around, sometimes living with her father and sometimes not, and eventually even became reunited with her mother – who had by then also escaped the cult. Her mother’s boyfriends (or at least the ones she describes) were predatory and abusive and she once again took off on her own. To earn some money, she took on a role as a film extra and this eventually led her to getting her foot in the Hollywood door. The remainder of the account is centred on the years that followed and predominantly the men she met and had professional and personal relationships with.

    It’s here that we come across a movie executive who, she says, invited her to a meeting at a hotel only to sexually abuse her. The man is not named but it’s very clear that she’s talking about Harvey Weinstein. I listed to an audio version of the book – read by the author – and this section was

    harrowing. The incident clearly affected her a good deal and she was keen to take the matter further but her agent advised her to sweep it under he carpet.

    Later she met a film director – again not named, but identifiable as Robert Rodriguez – with whom she began a five-year relationship. RR turned out to be a jealous bully who eventually pushed McGowan to the point she became ill. From here on she talks a little about how her career progressed but a good deal about her contempt for the male species in general. In fact, the last third of the book is effectively a lecture, explaining how men are power driven, born with perceived entitlement and with a need to control, sexualise and abuse women.

    Ok, I’ve no doubt that Rose had come across more than her fair share of bad men, in fact her upbringing and subsequent career path would pretty much ensure that this was the case, but this book really does feel one-sided. There’s not a single male (other that a couple of casual references to peripheral characters) who behaves well here. Is this just bad luck or, dare I say it, careful editing. I'm tempted to suggest that RM might have a touch of the misandrist about her.

    There’s clearly a good point to be made about the need for female equality but RM’s rant feels like a dreadful over-egging of the pudding. She's extrapolated her own experiences to make more general and wider reaching observations and suggestions. Yes, maybe there are very few female movie directors but – and I can only speak from personal experience – in the area I worked for 40 years, women are starting to get much closer to workplace equality. In fact, in the last ten years of my working life (a period I held my most senior positions) I had more female bosses than male. And male abuse directed towards women was, I strongly believe, nothing like as prevalent as that experienced by the author.

    Towards the end of the book there’s a good deal of self promotion about an album she has coming out and some skin care products she’s working on, but I’d rather switched off by this point. It was a case of a good book gone bad.

  • Dylan

    content warning: transphobia

    (Keep it classy TERFs. If this review is deleted I will post it again. I have reported the user for their abusive message. I would like to know now if Goodreads stands with transphobia or not.)

    I read the book, and here are my thoughts

    It is an interesting book, that examines McGowan's own experiences as a victim of cults, sexism, and assault, that exposes a system that continues to abuse women, but this is no feminist tome.

    McGowan needs to defend and stand for all wome

    content warning: transphobia

    (Keep it classy TERFs. If this review is deleted I will post it again. I have reported the user for their abusive message. I would like to know now if Goodreads stands with transphobia or not.)

    I read the book, and here are my thoughts

    It is an interesting book, that examines McGowan's own experiences as a victim of cults, sexism, and assault, that exposes a system that continues to abuse women, but this is no feminist tome.

    McGowan needs to defend and stand for all women, not just white cis women. McGowan needs to understand that it is intersectional feminism or it is no feminism. McGowan's feminism is not intersectional, and so any point she makes herein is disqualified from coming from a feminist point of view. To segregate people to their genitals as McGowan does ("Have trans women bled? Do they experience the stigma surrounding their period? Have they had their organs restricted by law?" "Are their bodies objectified from birth?") reinforces stereotypes that reduce women only to being an object with a womb and a vagina and breasts, thus destroying McGowan's feminism. McGowan needs to educate herself on the experiences of trans women. Trans women have never spent a day as a man. Trans women experience sexism, they have grown up internalizing the same degradation and disrespect that cis women do, and on top of that experience a degradation and hatred that cis women will never experience, and then add the pressures of toxic masculinity. Trans women experience violence more frequently than cis women (both gendered and transphobic violence), trans women are stuck in men's prisons and are subject to extreme violence there. Trans women's very existence is threatened by the forces of government, education, health care, housing, and economy. Trans women are women.

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