The Traitor Prince

The Traitor Prince

Javan Najafai, crown prince of Akram, has spent the last ten years at an elite boarding school, far away from his kingdom. But his eagerly awaited return home is cut short when a mysterious imposter takes his place—and no one believes Javan is the true prince.After barely escaping the imposter’s assassins, Javan is thrown into Maqbara, the kingdom’s most dangerous prison....

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Title:The Traitor Prince
Author:C.J. Redwine
Rating:
Edition Language:English

The Traitor Prince Reviews

  • Carina Olsen

    This book broke my heart. Which was fully rude of it. But I loved it so very much, despite how broken my heart is. These fairytale retellings are the very best. And this third one was so amazing. I love how every book is a standalone, yet set in the same world around the same time. And small hints from all the other books.

    This book tells the story of Javan and Sajda. It begins with Javan still at his school, where he have been at all times for the last ten years. Javan is a prince. He is doing h

    This book broke my heart. Which was fully rude of it. But I loved it so very much, despite how broken my heart is. These fairytale retellings are the very best. And this third one was so amazing. I love how every book is a standalone, yet set in the same world around the same time. And small hints from all the other books.

    This book tells the story of Javan and Sajda. It begins with Javan still at his school, where he have been at all times for the last ten years. Javan is a prince. He is doing his very best to become the best at school to honor his dead mother, and to make his father proud. And ah, Javan really is the best there. I loved that. But oh.

    He also ignores just about every person in this school too, which was depressing to read about. I wanted and needed this lovely boy to have more fun. To spend time with his could-be friends. He does have one friend, though, Kellan. And I wish there was more of this boy. I do not know what happened to him. He was pretty awesome, but was only there in the beginning. Anyway. Not going to share the whole start of the book, just that Javan is still at the school, almost about to graduate and go home to his kingdom. But then he's almost murdered when he's ready to go home. Then another boy is pretending to be him, taking his carriage and things home with him. Javan survives his attempted murder, and follows the impostor. It does not go well. Ack.

    The plot of this book is how Javan is trying to reveal that there is an impostor trying to steal his kingdom. But people to do believe him. His own uncle is working against him, saying that he is the impostor. And so Javan is about to be murdered again. But instead ends up in the worst prison in this kingdom. And gosh, this prison. It was all kinds of awful and I couldn't help but love every moment spent in it. Which was just about the whole book. Shudders. There is so much happening. Whole book was interesting and exciting.

    While the beginning of the book is all Javan, when he arrives at the prison we start getting point of views from Sajda too. And oh, how I adored this girl. I loved reading about her so much. She has been inside this prison since she was five years old. Since she was sold as a slave to the warden. My heart simply broke for this girl. She hasn't been outside for so long. She's had to protect herself from prisoners. And from the warden woman. All that she wants is to be free. To travel far away. To know everything. Sniffs.

    I simply loved getting to know Sajda. I loved how she had one friend, and older man named Tarek. He was amazing to read about. Though this one scene with him killed me. Gosh. There is also something special about Sajda. She had magic. And in an awesome way. Though the warden has placed cuffs on her arms, so her magic is very limited. Sad face. But Sajda was amazing. Brave and fierce and strong. I really enjoyed reading about her and learning about her magic. I just wish to know even more about her.

    Reading about Javan spending time is this prison was pretty awful. A few people want to kill him here too, of course. Rude. But he quickly becomes sort of friends with Sajda. And I loved reading about these two getting to know each other. Eee. They were the cutest together and I shipped them so hard. I loved how she was able to help him and protect him, for the most part. Which he needed. Because this prison has an arena. And there is some type of fighting. And it was so brutal and awful and so exciting to read about.

    I have already said more than I was going to about this book, yet not nearly enough at the same time. Gosh. There is just so much happening. I loved Javan and Sajda so much. There is also a point of view of the false prince, and it was the rudest. I hated this boy. So much. But I loved this story. I loved how Javan and Sajda worked together, trying to figure out how he would be able to prove he was the real prince. Their story was the best. I just wish there was even more. I want another book with them. Ack.

    There are tons of reasons for why this book was amazing. The school beginning was a bit slow, but also fast to read, and it passed so quickly too. Ahh. And then the prison parts happened. And the arena. And the small romance started. And this whole book was simply perfection. And I loved it very much. So five stars for sure. Even though my heart is all kinds of broken. Because there were a lot of death in this book. Gruesome ones too. And some of them ruined me a little. But so well done. So I couldn't help but love it.

    I love how the cover fits so well with the story. First, it's gorgeous. And it fits very much. The crown is for Javan. Aka the crown that he does not have at the moment. And the iron cuffs are for Sajda, that she is forced to wear at all times. Gorgeous cover, but brutal too. I must also mention the ending of this book a little bit. It's all kinds of bittersweet. A good ending, like all these lovely books, but also so heartbreaking. And also very fitting with the characters, and I loved that. Broke my heart a little, but beyond amazing.

    I have so much love for all these books by C. J. Eee. She's amazing. And her books are awesome. And I simply cannot wait to read more books from this world. They are all going to be so good. Sigh. Next one will be Cinderella, and I simply can't wait. And also, I very much need the Hansel and Gretel story soon. They are in many of these books, and I love them already. Huge thank you to HarperTeen for the auto approval on Edelweiss, that made me able to read this precious book early. So happy to have read this.

    ---

    This review was first posted on my blog, Carina's Books, here:

  • Madison

    With The Traitor Prince, C.J. Redwine once again delivers an epic fantasy, with aching romance, adventure, heart-pounding injustice, and high stakes as the characters fight for their survival.

    Prince Javan has spent the last ten years away at school, working harder than all his classmates to fulfil the promise he made to his mother to be the best, learn the most, so that he can become a just and strong ruler. But when he is attacked on the eve of his return home, Javan knows he must now fight for

    With The Traitor Prince, C.J. Redwine once again delivers an epic fantasy, with aching romance, adventure, heart-pounding injustice, and high stakes as the characters fight for their survival.

    Prince Javan has spent the last ten years away at school, working harder than all his classmates to fulfil the promise he made to his mother to be the best, learn the most, so that he can become a just and strong ruler. But when he is attacked on the eve of his return home, Javan knows he must now fight for his future and the safety of his kingdom. Thrown into the treacherous prison, Maqbara, while a traitor takes his rightful place, Javan tries to befriend the prison slave girl, Sajda, who has her own dangerous secret to protect. Forced to fight against monsterous creatures and defend himself against the other prisoners, Javan and his few allies put into place a plan to return him to his throne, but it will not be without sacrifice.

    There is so much to love about this beautiful, richly detailed fantasy. Javan is a character who is easy to like and support. He is noble and honourable, wanting desperately to please his father, honour his mother's memory, and become a good ruler. Being thrown into prison is something that challenges everything he has always known about his life and his faith. But through it, he grows. He's also no soft aristocrat. Javan is more than capable of defending himself, and is both intelligent and strong. But no matter how much readers will like Javan, I believe it will be Sajda who truly steals everyone's hearts. Sajda is formidably strong. She has learnt to protect her heart with stone and use her tough exterior to keep her safe from the prisoners she is forced to control. As the prison warden's slave, Sajda has lived most of her life within the confines of the prison walls. As a feared magical creature, her magical powers have lain dormant bound by the iron cuffs that have been forced upon her. Watching as Javan slowly wiggles his way into Sajda's life, trust, and, finally, heart was so wonderful.

    Amidst the action, deadly gladiator-like fights against strange and monsterous creatures, and the political intrigue of this book, the romance stands as a sweet and heartwarming reminder of the the freedom for which Javan is fighting. Sajda is, at first, defensive, unwilling to believe Javan or risk her limited freedom to protect him. But Javan is persistent and the friendship he offers is hard to resist. I loved how, even as Javan and Sajda become reluctant allies and then friends, they continue to spar, both verbally and physically. Competition is a huge part of their relationship and I loved their banter that lightens the story.

    The Traitor Prince is the third book in the Ravenspire series. I love, love, love, that each of the three books have been standalones, complete stories in their own right. And while there are a few appearances of crossover characters - bounty hunters Hansel and Gretel make another appearance, as does Ari and Sebastian - the stories do not need to be read in any order to enjoy each new book.

    The Traitor Prince is a beautiful fantasy, the perfect addition to this series, and the most addictive mix of intrigue, action, and romance.

    The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own.

    Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog

  • Cassie James

    The Traitor Prince is all I was expecting and more. C.J. Redwine is an author who I have been super impressed with ever since The Shadow Queen and she just keeps getting better and better. The Traitor Prince continues this amazing series with the story of Javan, a very interesting and compelling character. He is the Crown Prince of Akram, a kingdom he has been away

    The Traitor Prince is all I was expecting and more. C.J. Redwine is an author who I have been super impressed with ever since The Shadow Queen and she just keeps getting better and better. The Traitor Prince continues this amazing series with the story of Javan, a very interesting and compelling character. He is the Crown Prince of Akram, a kingdom he has been away from for a very long time. Javan has been at the prestigious Milisatria Academy for the Comportment and Education of the Nobility in the northern kingdom of Loch Talam since he was 7 years old. Javan is what we call a ‘Straight A's’ student. Due to the dying wish his mother made, He's made sure he is the best at everything. He never made time to have fun and instead strived for perfection, He never even went home for holidays. Javan eventually graduated with top Honors. The day of his graduation, He is attacked and left for dead by some assassins from his homeland. It is revealed that they were sent to get rid of him so his illegitimate cousin Rashim (who Javan never knew existed and somewhat resembles the Prince) will take his place as the Crown Prince and no one will know better as Javan hasn't been seen in years. Javan luckily survives from the clutches of death and escapes with the intent of stopping the imposter from taking his throne. But as he unfortunately finds out, the betrayal and treachery runs deep. Instead of being liberated, he is branded a traitor and sent to be executed. But for the kindness of a guard whose conscience will not leave him be, he would have been murdered. He is instead sent to the Maqbara, the vicious prison of Akram where the worst of the worst are sent. Javan is thought dead by those who want him gone.

    In Maqbara, Javan meets Sajda. She's beautiful and deadly and has been enslaved by the warden of Maqbara since she was a child. Javan has a hard time in the prison as he quickly makes enemy with a thuggish leader of a gang after saving an old man (who is a dear friend to Sajda) from them. Javan learns that a tournament is held twice a year in Maqbara, whoever emerges the champion gets an audience with the king and asks for a boon as long as it is within the parameters of the law. The Tournament won't be easy as it involves many rounds of battling deadly monsters and emerging victorious. But Javan is desperate for any way to get to his father and reveal the treachery (by showing his father something only both of them knows about). What makes the whole situation more precarious is that the King is being slowly poisoned by his enemies unknown to Javan, their plan is for Rahim to ascend to the throne after the death of the king. Javan has to win the tournament for the sake of the future of Akram, He realises that there is no way for him to do it without Sajda's help. He enlists her help by offering her what she wants most, freedom.

    Sajda hasn't had an easy life, being enslaved to the villainous Warden at 5 was hard enough, but to have her magic locked away and stifled is the worst. Her powers gave her strength enough to survive Maqbara and the evil prisoners. But what she has always longed for is freedom and knowing what it's like to truly live. Meeting Javan was an unexpected blessing in disguise, they don't have it easy at first. But as they got to know each other, they both begin to realise they are each what the other needs, in more ways than one.

    There is so much action and I loved the way it was vividly portrayed, It was like the words came to life. That spellbinding ability is not something all authors have. I finished this book in less than 6 hours nonstop. The romance between Javan and Sajda is amazing, intense, hot, deep, meaningful and it was borne from the rawest of emotions. C.J. Redwine is so good at tugging at my heartstrings and making me fall head over hills for her characters.

    Javan is honorable, resilient, loyal and loving, Sajda is badass, guarded but an angel underneath, brilliant, powerful, amazing, and just about every good quality I love in a heroine. The ending of The Traitor Prince was really quite satisfying, There's this understanding that things had to happen the way they did for everything to be alright. I loved the way the brilliant storylines were wrapped up, I can't wait for the next tale in the Ravenspire series.

    The Traitor Prince has it all, drama, action, adventure, romance, betrayal, suspense, magic, top notch writing, MONSTERS!! and a resplendent and symbolic breathtaking cover.

    I happily recommend it to fantasy fans, It will resonate well with lovers of the series.

    P.S: Those glimpses of characters from the previous books are so cherished, It was really nice to at least get those tidbits. (Ari was freaking adorable).

    P.P.S:The monsters in this book are terrifying, those who love stuff like that will have a field day. I loved the descriptions and the scenes were so well put together I was too entranced to even be scared.

    P.P.P.S: Last one, I have to say this one last time. You will ship Sajda and Javan so hard because they're cool like that.

  • Alexa

    It would more accurately be a 3.5, I’d say. As with the previous novels in this companion series, I enjoyed Redwine’s spin on fairytales and fairytale tropes. I liked her characters a lot (particularly Sajda) too. But I did feel like this one suffered a wee bit from a villainous character (or two) who didn’t particularly impress me; it certainly made me feel a little less sympathetic about the stakes (even with all the intense things that happen). I still thought this was enjoyable, and that end

    It would more accurately be a 3.5, I’d say. As with the previous novels in this companion series, I enjoyed Redwine’s spin on fairytales and fairytale tropes. I liked her characters a lot (particularly Sajda) too. But I did feel like this one suffered a wee bit from a villainous character (or two) who didn’t particularly impress me; it certainly made me feel a little less sympathetic about the stakes (even with all the intense things that happen). I still thought this was enjoyable, and that ending was totally one that made me feel satisfied after I read the last page.

  • Peachy

    My synopsis: An Arabic retelling of The Prince and the Pauper: Javan, the Crown Prince of Akram and an honorable and dutiful son, has been away from his kingdom for

    My synopsis: An Arabic retelling of The Prince and the Pauper: Javan, the Crown Prince of Akram and an honorable and dutiful son, has been away from his kingdom for ten years striving to fulfill his mother's dying wish, to obtain the coveted red sash awarded to the one who has earned the most honors in Milisatria, an elite boarding school. Rahim is an ambitious and ruthless young man who grew up in poverty, a bastard thrown away by his own father, and he is willing to get rid of anything and anyone on his way to the life he thinks he deserves. In Rahim's quest for power, he participates in a political conspiracy to steal the prince's identity. In order to protect his father and his rights, Javan needs to survive battles against deadly monsters and desperate prisoners. What does it take to win the throne - Javan's honor or Rahim's ambition? 

    I've never read the original The Prince and the Pauper, so I can't do a detailed comparison of how similar the plot is to The Traitor Prince. However, I do know that in the original, the identity switch was decided mutually, so that's a major difference. 

    Although it is listed as the third book in the Ravenspire series, I can personally attest that The Traitor Prince stands on its own - it begins and ends independently from any previous or upcoming books in the series (I've never read the first 2 books), and from my understanding, it is simply set in another kingdom adjacent to the kingdom/s from previous Ravenspire books. 

    Though mostly told in Javan's point of view, some chapters were also told by Rahim, the impostor, as well as Sajda, a slave who becomes Javan's friend. This added another layer to building complex characters. We start to find out the strengths and weaknesses of Javan, Rahim, and Sajda, but also the motivations behind their actions. 

    I think I tried really hard to be engrossed in the world, but somehow I felt distant. Maybe because it was a darker fantasy world. I did enjoy the gladiatorial scenes though, I thought they were exciting albeit gruesome and brutal and cruel. 

    As much as I was entertained by the action scenes, I think what I appreciated most were the underlying themes - the depth of the topics touched through the characters and their experiences. 

    One of the dominant themes is Javan's faith. Even through all that he's been through, he always falls back to his faith. His struggles to remain faithful is presented very realistically. Sometimes he wants to give up and he feels abandoned, but then suddenly he finds peace within despite the chaos he's surrounded with. I can certainly relate to this as it is similar to my relationship with Jesus Christ - I can't always understand His will and His timing, but at the end of the day I trust that He only has my best interest. 

    Power is neither good nor evil. It just is. It's what people do with power that matters. 

    Another theme explored is power. Sajda is the obvious one - she possesses a great power, and is subjected to being called a "monster" because of it. Though other characters such as the warden and the impostor prince who possess their own type of power are accepted even though they use their power to commit monstrous acts. 

    Overall, it was really enjoyable. I like the little bit of romance, and it's nice to see it build up well, so definitely not insta-love. I'm really satisfied with the resolution.

    SOURCE:

  • Iryna Khymych

    1/5 Stars

    Where do I even start with this book? As excited as I was with the premise, the actual story for me did not deliver. And neither did the writing.

    From the first page I already had a feeling this was not going to be a book that I was going to end up enjoying. The writing was stagnant, ill-paced, and unimaginative. I’ve read books with beautiful prose and descriptions and this just f

    1/5 Stars

    Where do I even start with this book? As excited as I was with the premise, the actual story for me did not deliver. And neither did the writing.

    From the first page I already had a feeling this was not going to be a book that I was going to end up enjoying. The writing was stagnant, ill-paced, and unimaginative. I’ve read books with beautiful prose and descriptions and this just fell flat.

    For example, the main character traveled three weeks through the desert in the span of one sentence. That’s it. That’s all we got. I mean are you telling me that the character’s trip across a large, arid, and possibly dangerous desert was so uneventful?

    The main villain of the story, Rahim, was your stereotypical villain. His dialogue (along with everyone else’s) was pitiful. He was a pathetic villain who was violent for the sake of being violent. That’s it? What drove him, besides growing up poor? Was the author trying to say that people who grow up poor and unwanted by their fathers all grow up to be murderous villains? His backstory needed more work and so did his motivations.

    Our goody two-shoes of a main character, Javan, somehow found himself thrown into what was allegedly the most dangerous and heinous prison in the city of Akram. While there he suddenly became a “gladiator” forced to fight against vicious monsters and fellow prisoners for the chance at a possible meeting with the King to possibly maybe gain his freedom. Yup. That’s it. I can’t tell you how sick I am of the whole gladiator trope. If you are going to go down that route write it well, (Jay Kristoff’s Godsgrave as an example). Also coming back to Javan all he ever did was repeat himself. Literally every other page of his POV involved him repeating things he said and being all “woe is me”. I was tired of hearing about why he was where he was and the endless repetition of his monologue.

    I went a lot farther into this book than I wanted (80%), only because I was initially so excited to read it that I kept hoping there had to be some sort of redemption to this story towards the end (which I ended up skipping to). FYI, there wasn’t. I can’t even bring myself to write about the other characters or issues I had with this book because I will surely run out of space.

  • Hesione

    Prison fights? Arabian tales? A warden girl with a mean right hook? I'm here for this thanks.

  • Simona

    That cover though 😍😍😍

  • Cindy ✩☽ Savage Queen ♔

    Sounds right up my alley...

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