Imperial Machine

Imperial Machine

From acclaimed writer Charles Soule comes a brand-new, exhilarating series exploring Darth Vader's early history. Picking up directly where Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith ends, follow Vader as he receives his legendary red lightsaber and witness Vader's rise to power as a Dark Lord of the Sith!COLLECTING: STAR WARS: DARTH VADER 1-6...

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Title:Imperial Machine
Author:Charles Soule
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Edition Language:English

Imperial Machine Reviews

  • David Dalton

    Not easy being an apprentice to the Emperor, who happens to be a Master Sith. This is my 2nd Vader collection that I have read this past week. I will look for more.

  • Will M.

    I've been a huge fan of Star Wars ever since I was a child but it's weird that this is the very first Star Wars graphic novel I've read. I'm glad though, because it's amazing and I want to read more.

    Darth Vader will always be one of, if not the most, iconic figure of Star Wars. This new graphic novel series aims to give us a background of Vader's past. It starts off where Episode III ends. This first volume generally shows how Vader got his lightsaber. It also gives a bit of information on how h

    I've been a huge fan of Star Wars ever since I was a child but it's weird that this is the very first Star Wars graphic novel I've read. I'm glad though, because it's amazing and I want to read more.

    Darth Vader will always be one of, if not the most, iconic figure of Star Wars. This new graphic novel series aims to give us a background of Vader's past. It starts off where Episode III ends. This first volume generally shows how Vader got his lightsaber. It also gives a bit of information on how he joined the dark side (although this is common knowledge already). This graphic novel is a lot of fun and I can't wait to read more of it. To be honest, Darth Vader is not even my favorite villain of the Star Wars franchise. Darth Maul is my favorite but we don't get to read/watch/hear much about him, unlike Vader. Vader comes in second though, it's great how we see his early dark side days here in this series. I can't wait to read more.

    5/5. What a great first graphic novel read of 2018! The artwork is one of my favorites out there coupled with a terrific plot. You can't go wrong with this new series!

  • Donovan

    This is how I wish Kieron Gillen’s series would have started. Not just rehash and nostalgia, but introspection and aggrandizement.

    Anakin Skywalker finishes his dark journey to become Sith Lord Darth Vader. And it’s amazing. Vader embraces the pain and suffering to test, increase, and improve his power. And the Star Wars mythos expands with the history of the Sith light saber being explained, as Vader journeys to the Outer Rim to procure a light saber from the very last Jedi.

    Epic, beautiful in

    This is how I wish Kieron Gillen’s series would have started. Not just rehash and nostalgia, but introspection and aggrandizement.

    Anakin Skywalker finishes his dark journey to become Sith Lord Darth Vader. And it’s amazing. Vader embraces the pain and suffering to test, increase, and improve his power. And the Star Wars mythos expands with the history of the Sith light saber being explained, as Vader journeys to the Outer Rim to procure a light saber from the very last Jedi.

    Epic, beautiful in his tragedy and resolve, Imperial Machine is the beginning of something great.

  • FanboyBen

    When news first broke that we would be getting another Darth Vader series to follow up Kieron Gillen’s amazing run with the character, I was nervous. Gillen’s series did SO MUCH to flesh out Vader as a character, and I was skeptical about the prospect of ANOTHER series centered solely around him – I mean really, what more could there be to say about Vader that warranted a whole other series, especially so soon after the wrap up of his first series? Even with the the news that the series wouldn’t

    When news first broke that we would be getting another Darth Vader series to follow up Kieron Gillen’s amazing run with the character, I was nervous. Gillen’s series did SO MUCH to flesh out Vader as a character, and I was skeptical about the prospect of ANOTHER series centered solely around him – I mean really, what more could there be to say about Vader that warranted a whole other series, especially so soon after the wrap up of his first series? Even with the the news that the series wouldn’t be set between A New Hope and The Empires Strikes Back, like Gillen’s series was, but instead immediately post-Revenge of the Sith-when Vader is still new to his role as the Galactic Empire’s chief enforcer and as Palpatine’s apprentice-I was still skeptical and couldn’t help but wish that Marvel would just leave well enough alone.

    Well, color me surprised-I’ve never been happier to be wrong. Because Charles Soule’s new “Darth Vader” series, though maybe not as deep or as heady as Gillen’s, is a TON of fun. In fact, I think there’s an argument to be made, based on just these first six issues, that Soule might actually be writing the more purely enjoyable of the two series. Watching Vader wrestling with the monster he’s become is thrilling in a way that I didn’t expect: we’re so used to seeing the Dark Lord of the Sith as the walking embodiment of the cool, collected and beyond powerful villain. Seeing him at this stage of his “career,” weakened and still raw over the loss of all that he’s lost, is intriguing, to say the least.

    It also doesn’t hurt that artist Giuseppe Camuncoli is KILLING it. I’ve never seen any of Camuncoli’s work before, but his colorful, ever-so-slightly-exaggerated-style is perfectly suited to Soule’s highly emotional story. Whether it’s Vader lashing out at the Emperor immediately post-“NOOOO!” moment in “Revenge of the Sith,”, or Vader fighting a Jedi Master atop a collapsing dam, or Vader attempting to corrupt – or, as it’s referred to in-story, “bleed” – a lightsaber’s crystal, Camuncoli continually strikes the perfect balance of “cartoony” meets “grounded,” especially when in regards to how he depicts the impact all of this is having on Vader himself. He’s a great fit for a great story, one that I can’t wait to see the next chapter of.

  • Jim C

    This is a collection that takes place right after Anakin becomes Darth Vader. In fact, we get the infamous (not in a good way) scene of Vader yelling "NOOOOOOO!" when he finds out Padme is dead. That is the beginning of this collection.

    I liked this collection and it is a nice story of how Anakin is getting use to being Darth Vader. He is now part of the dark side but the suit that he needs because of his injuries is new. He needs to get use to fighting again and I liked how this collection portr

    This is a collection that takes place right after Anakin becomes Darth Vader. In fact, we get the infamous (not in a good way) scene of Vader yelling "NOOOOOOO!" when he finds out Padme is dead. That is the beginning of this collection.

    I liked this collection and it is a nice story of how Anakin is getting use to being Darth Vader. He is now part of the dark side but the suit that he needs because of his injuries is new. He needs to get use to fighting again and I liked how this collection portrayed that. It was weird seeing Vader fallible but it makes sense. This collection also reinforces that Anakin is responsible for his decisions even though we get to see The Emperor playing his mind games. This collection also ties in with

    and Episode II and neither tie-in was forced.

    I liked this collection and I am looking forward to seeing more stories about Vader. We can never have too much of his character. The artwork is really good (I did have issues with The Emperor as he was a little too troll-like for my taste) and the cliffhanger at the end really entices me because you know it cannot be good for that character.

  • Neil Coulter

    Kieron Gillen's

    graphic novel series started strong and then fizzled out completely by the end. So I wasn't especially hopeful about the new series by Charles Soule. But I actually quite enjoyed this story. Soule introduces some new elements to Jedi/Sith mythology, and they all work just fine. (This is not usually the case with SW graphic novels--especially the recent

    series.) I also like that the book ends with a glimpse of the formation of the Inquisitors. Anything that conn

    Kieron Gillen's

    graphic novel series started strong and then fizzled out completely by the end. So I wasn't especially hopeful about the new series by Charles Soule. But I actually quite enjoyed this story. Soule introduces some new elements to Jedi/Sith mythology, and they all work just fine. (This is not usually the case with SW graphic novels--especially the recent

    series.) I also like that the book ends with a glimpse of the formation of the Inquisitors. Anything that connects to

    is great with me. (Except that I found it disappointing how easily Vader defeats the Grand Inquisitor, who is one of my favorite SW villains and should have been able to hold his own longer than he did.)

    My only criticism of this first volume is that the dialogue doesn't feel like Anakin and Palpatine talking. Instead, it's just generic-Vader and generic-Emperor dialogue. The

    novel did a much better job of making me feel that it was Anakin speaking from within the Vader suit.

    I hope this series will continue strong. I'm eager for the next volume, and that rarely happens with any SW graphic novel.

  • Artemy

    Finally, a Marvel Star Wars comic set in a much more interesting time period between the prequels and the original trilogy, instead of that beaten to death space between episodes IV and V. And it’s a surprisingly good comic, too! Starting immediately after the end of episode III, it shows Vader going on a quest to get himself a brand new Sith-red lightsaber. We find out where the red ‘sabers come from and how they’re made as we follow Vader on an action-packed trip to kill a certain Jedi master.

    Finally, a Marvel Star Wars comic set in a much more interesting time period between the prequels and the original trilogy, instead of that beaten to death space between episodes IV and V. And it’s a surprisingly good comic, too! Starting immediately after the end of episode III, it shows Vader going on a quest to get himself a brand new Sith-red lightsaber. We find out where the red ‘sabers come from and how they’re made as we follow Vader on an action-packed trip to kill a certain Jedi master. It’s not a very deep story, but I had a lot of fun with it, and the artwork was quite nice. Recommended to all Vader fans! This is immediately better than the underwhelming Kieron Gillen series.

  • Chad

    Charles Soule has a hard act to follow. Keiron Gillen's Vader series was aces. One thing he has going for him is Giuseppe Camuncoli. His art is divine. It looks amazing (as in Spider-man) in a Star Wars book. For this series, we're looking at when Anakin first becomes Vader, right after the end of Revenge of the Sith. The plot for this one was a bit strange. Sith must create their light sabers by taking them from a jedi and making the kyber crystal bleed. I found that last part a little hokey. W

    Charles Soule has a hard act to follow. Keiron Gillen's Vader series was aces. One thing he has going for him is Giuseppe Camuncoli. His art is divine. It looks amazing (as in Spider-man) in a Star Wars book. For this series, we're looking at when Anakin first becomes Vader, right after the end of Revenge of the Sith. The plot for this one was a bit strange. Sith must create their light sabers by taking them from a jedi and making the kyber crystal bleed. I found that last part a little hokey. What I did like was the jedi master who Vader goes after. he's devoted to only one thing, fighting and has a very neat look about him. The way Vader beats him is badass, using a jedi's weaknesses against him. Then we get introduced to the Inquisitors, lesser Sith who will be hunting down the remaining jedi in hiding.

  • Sam Quixote

    How did Darth Vader get his red lightsaber? Better question: who fucking cares?! That said, while this may be the flimsy plot of Charles Soule and Giuseppe Camuncoli’s first volume in the rebooted Vader series, Imperial Machine surprisingly wasn’t that bad.

    I liked that Soule didn’t write any internal monologue for Vader so he remains aloof from the reader, as mysterious, cold and menacing as he is in the movies. In fact, there’s a good balance throughout between writer and artist with Soule know

    How did Darth Vader get his red lightsaber? Better question: who fucking cares?! That said, while this may be the flimsy plot of Charles Soule and Giuseppe Camuncoli’s first volume in the rebooted Vader series, Imperial Machine surprisingly wasn’t that bad.

    I liked that Soule didn’t write any internal monologue for Vader so he remains aloof from the reader, as mysterious, cold and menacing as he is in the movies. In fact, there’s a good balance throughout between writer and artist with Soule knowing when to step back and let Camuncoli tell the story with his impressive, sweeping cinematic visuals.

    And I also liked that Vader is not the invincible force of nature that we’ve seen in other books like Vader Down. Imperial Machine takes place directly after Episode 3: Revenge of the Sith, so Anakin has only just been reborn as Vader (the widely-mocked “NOOOO!” scene opens this book - a bold move). We see him still dealing with the immense physical, mental and emotional trauma he endured in that movie, as well as getting to grips with his unfamiliar new robot body. There are also the remnants of the struggle within him between the Light and the Dark Side of the Force. Vader remains formidable but it was interesting and refreshing to see his moments of vulnerability here.

    Despite his minor setbacks, it’s still a predictable story with Vader smashing through the contrived obstacles Soule throws in his path like the new rogue Jedi, Master Infil’A, who’s as flat and unmemorable as any of the new characters Soule’s created during his Marvel tenure for the Inhumans, Daredevil et al. Most of all, I couldn’t shake the impression that I was reading a mountain of a molehill with the big “climax” taking place on Mustafar as Vader created his lightsaber and leaving me thinking “… meh.”

    It’s no must-read or especially memorable but Darth Vader, Volume 1: Imperial Machine is entertaining enough in a shallow, mindless way.

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