Black Hammer, Vol. 2: The Event

Black Hammer, Vol. 2: The Event

When a visitor from the outside world arrives on the Farm, looking for the Black Hammer and bringing news of Spiral City to its Golden Age heroes, everything changes. Her arrival stirs up old memories and awakens new hope in the marooned heroes and they make a new attempt to escape their strange prison. - Jeff Lemire's (Descender, All-New Hawkeye) most earth-shattering wor...

DownloadRead Online
Title:Black Hammer, Vol. 2: The Event
Author:Jeff Lemire
Rating:
Edition Language:English

Black Hammer, Vol. 2: The Event Reviews

  • Paul E. Morph

    Seriously great stuff; even the 'fill-in' issues are worth five stars. I love this book...

  • Chad

    Black Hammer's daughter arrives and she's not OK with being stuck on the little farm as the rest of our tragic heroes have been. While she investigates the town we delve deeper into each character's backstory. Lemire has done such a fantastic job of reintroducing these archetypes of our youth with just enough of a tweak to keep you coming back for more. Ordstrom's moody art fits the setting and I really enjoyed David Rubin's fill in issue for the origin of Talky-Walky. Rubin's is a Spanish artis

    Black Hammer's daughter arrives and she's not OK with being stuck on the little farm as the rest of our tragic heroes have been. While she investigates the town we delve deeper into each character's backstory. Lemire has done such a fantastic job of reintroducing these archetypes of our youth with just enough of a tweak to keep you coming back for more. Ordstrom's moody art fits the setting and I really enjoyed David Rubin's fill in issue for the origin of Talky-Walky. Rubin's is a Spanish artist who in the past year has started to make inroads here in America as his comics are translated to English. I love the retro 40's style animation vibe he brings to his comics. Jeff Lemire's cover for the Abraham Slam issue made me chuckle when he signed it as Lemirefeld.

    Received a review copy from Dark Horse and Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

  • Jedi JC Daquis

    With so many great titles in this comicbook era, it is easy to overlook this genius work written by Jeff Lemire. Black Hammer: The Event combines Lemire's themes of sadness, family and transcending yearning for love and acceptance with sci-fi and drama in this yet another great volume. Black Hammer's main strength is in the deep yet troubled personalities of the Golden Age heroes who were trapped in a strange rural town for a decade. The way they were written were so effective to me that I'd rat

    With so many great titles in this comicbook era, it is easy to overlook this genius work written by Jeff Lemire. Black Hammer: The Event combines Lemire's themes of sadness, family and transcending yearning for love and acceptance with sci-fi and drama in this yet another great volume. Black Hammer's main strength is in the deep yet troubled personalities of the Golden Age heroes who were trapped in a strange rural town for a decade. The way they were written were so effective to me that I'd rather read their sad (sometimes pitiful) stories rather than them figuring out a way to depart from the world they are trapped in.

    Oh and I enjoyed the filler backstory issues! Lemire has utilized the flashback technique very effectively and efficiently, tying up their past with their feelings and the things they are currently dealing with. It's like watching LOST, without the crappy ending (I hope Black Hammer doesn't end with that cork thing!)

    Black Hammer is also beautifully drawn by Dean Ormston. The melty faces and the eerie, almost barren spaces in the pages perfectly conveys the sadness and the mystery that envelopes both the town and the characters.

  • Donovan

    An almost Twilight Zone continuation of interpersonal drama, sharp dialog, black humor, and the increasingly exciting mystery of why the inhabitants of Black Hammer Farm can’t leave post-Crisis. The artwork is shared by David Rubin, whose cleaner style accommodates the vintage tone.

  • Ivan

    After three months of reading Manga it's good to finally read something that has color.

    Not much is happening in this volume but writing and melancholic atmosphere are amazing enough to earn this volume 5 stars and place on favorites shelf.

  • Philip

    4.25ish stars.

    Maybe my favorite on-going title. Great character work and a solid, clever plot that deftly balances Golden Age superheroes with New Age struggles. It makes the '90s flashbacks feel like the '40s but it works. This is a big improvement over the first volume; now that the character studies are out of the way, it leaves a lot of room to delve into the plot and expand personalities. Good artwork, not my personal favorite, but it works well for the story, and I appreciate the artistic

    4.25ish stars.

    Maybe my favorite on-going title. Great character work and a solid, clever plot that deftly balances Golden Age superheroes with New Age struggles. It makes the '90s flashbacks feel like the '40s but it works. This is a big improvement over the first volume; now that the character studies are out of the way, it leaves a lot of room to delve into the plot and expand personalities. Good artwork, not my personal favorite, but it works well for the story, and I appreciate the artistic differences between the flashbacks and the current storyline. Looking forward to future installments.

  • David Schaafsma

    One of the best ongoing comic series, winner of the 2017 Eisner award for best ongoing series, based in part on the trust they had that this team would create a great story. Lemire seems increasingly to bring together two things he loves: 1) Realistic, character-driven stories based in the bleak and desolate northern Canadian towns he knows well, and 2) superheroes. It’s both a tribute to Golden Age comics for the geeky True Supe Fans, and an explanation to his Essex County fans about why these

    One of the best ongoing comic series, winner of the 2017 Eisner award for best ongoing series, based in part on the trust they had that this team would create a great story. Lemire seems increasingly to bring together two things he loves: 1) Realistic, character-driven stories based in the bleak and desolate northern Canadian towns he knows well, and 2) superheroes. It’s both a tribute to Golden Age comics for the geeky True Supe Fans, and an explanation to his Essex County fans about why these worlds belong together. It almost feels autobiographical to me, in a way.

    I liked the first volume set up, trusting a story would emerge, and it sort of begins to. All these superheroes with sad back stories are stuck on a farm in northern Canada: Abraham Slam, Colonel Randall Weird, Talky-Walky, Barbalien, Golden Gail, Madame Dragonfly. Okay, we’re still mainly in backstory here, but all of them in Lemire’s conception are deeply troubled people, true, carefully drawn characters, drawn also with heart by Dean Ormston (and one cute backstory of Walky Talky by David Rubin).

    In this volume the key event is that Lucy (ooh, what could her connection be to this group?!) shows up to nudge them to escape. She finds the nearby town to be A City That Always Sleeps, and in the library, all the books are blank, hmm. And this hammer. . . hmm, what superhero besides our Black Hammer also carries a hammer? Hmm. I fully expect this is going to be great, and so far it is very good. I say 4.5, fully expecting a 5 for the next volume.

  • Artemy

    That's more like it! I didn't fall in love with the first volume of Black Hammer, the story was too uneventful and the characters felt derivative. Fortunately, I thought the second one was an improvement.

    The main storyline finally starts moving as we meet a new character, the daughter of the hero Black Hammer. The characters start to question the place they're stuck in, some make rash decisions, and one of them doesn't even survive til the end of the book. We also get a tease of what actually ha

    That's more like it! I didn't fall in love with the first volume of Black Hammer, the story was too uneventful and the characters felt derivative. Fortunately, I thought the second one was an improvement.

    The main storyline finally starts moving as we meet a new character, the daughter of the hero Black Hammer. The characters start to question the place they're stuck in, some make rash decisions, and one of them doesn't even survive til the end of the book. We also get a tease of what actually happened during The Event which led to all the heroes being trapped on the farm, although no straight answers again despite even the title of the book suggesting otherwise.

    Lemire writes the tense relationships between all of the heroes really well, and the characters themselves open up a bit and become a little more relatable in a way. They're not exactly likeable, but you feel for them and care about their misfortunes.

    Which is precisely why I am still a bit mad that Lemire decided to make their superhero alter-egos as pastiches of real superheroes. The fact that their superhero selves are dollar store knockoffs of the actual Marvel and DC characters really detracts from the weight of this story, almost turning it into some kind of parody, despite that clearly not being the author's intention. What this book is is basically a dysfunctional family drama, and a good one at that, but every time their corny superhero past comes up, it yanks me right out of the story. I don't know why Lemire does that, because there is no deconstruction or clever commentary behind that, just a silly game of "

    " that cheapens the impact of the actual solid character work that is going on in the foreground. At least make them into more original superheroes, you know? They don't have to be clearly-Captain-Americas, kinda-like-Martian-Manhunters or basically-Shazams.

    Other than that, I enjoyed the second volume of Black Hammer quite a bit. The plot finally starts moving somewhere, there is more intrigue, more mystery and tension, and the actual characters, dragged down by their alter-egos as they are, still manage to be interesting and layered. I still don't understand all the insane love this comic gets, but at least now I can agree that it's a pretty solid read.

  • Dan Schwent

    Lucy Weber, The Black Hammer's daughter, starts trying to piece together the mystery of The Farm and the town of Rockwood but someone doesn't want her to find the answers she's looking for...

    Black Hammer volume 2 has fallen into my hands and it's a whopper.

    The tale of the Black Hammer is finally told and it's an homage to a slew of Jack Kirby creations like Thor, the New Gods, and the Inhumans. Talky-Walky's origin is also revealed, another Mystery in Space type of adventure, just as something

    Lucy Weber, The Black Hammer's daughter, starts trying to piece together the mystery of The Farm and the town of Rockwood but someone doesn't want her to find the answers she's looking for...

    Black Hammer volume 2 has fallen into my hands and it's a whopper.

    The tale of the Black Hammer is finally told and it's an homage to a slew of Jack Kirby creations like Thor, the New Gods, and the Inhumans. Talky-Walky's origin is also revealed, another Mystery in Space type of adventure, just as something sinister happens to Talky-Walky back on the farm.

    More of Golden Gail's past is reveals, as it the nature of the Event that led to the heroes arriving at The Farm to begin with. More of Abraham Slam and Barbalien's pasts are also revealed. Lucy unravels the mystery of Rockwood and meets her destiny. What the hell are Madam Dragonfly and Colonel Weird up to?

    Yeah, a lot of shit went down in this volume and it has me salivating for the next one. I love the depth Lemire has achieved in such a short number of issues. The world of the Black Hammer feels like it's been around for decades. The mystery surrounding Rockwood and the Farm is tantalizing and I'm ready to find out just what the hell is going on. Dean Ormstrom's moody, Mignola-esque art is perfect for the series.

    I really don't have any bad things to say about The Black Hammer. The slow burning mystery of what the hell is the deal with the Farm and Rockwood has me hooked. I'll be sad to see the series end in the next volume, if that's what happens. Four out of five stars.

Best Free Books is in no way intended to support illegal activity. Use it at your risk. We uses Search API to find books/manuals but doesn´t host any files. All document files are the property of their respective owners. Please respect the publisher and the author for their copyrighted creations. If you find documents that should not be here please report them


©2018 Best Free Books - All rights reserved.